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Amounts:
£1,000 - £5,000

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Hospitals in Colonial Calcutta 1757-1900 20 May 2011

Over the past few decades, academic research on medical history of colonial India have mostly concentrated on Public Health Policy of colonial government and the ingenious contrivance between colonial power and medicine in the formation of an empire. The history of hospitals in the colonies has been a relatively neglected area of research. The project intends to specifically study the social and political environment that spurred the development of hospitals in Calcutta under the East India Company's rule from 1757 to 1900. The discussion will narrate the formal history of the foundation of the hospitals in Colonial Calcutta from the late Eighteenth century under the Company's rule based on Government records, reports, surveys, newspapers and journals. The key goal of the project is to study the 'political ecology' of early hospital system in Calcutta during the Company's rule. The main emphasis would be on several key issues like l. the process of institutionalization of medical care for the indigenous people in the backdrop of a rising consciousness about public health in 2. A study of the social political structures of the colonial city that helped to create the hospitals and their relationship with the indigenous people 3. Social response of the indigenous groups

Amount: £1,600
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Misc India

The Lice Feeders: Typhus, Science and Survival in the Polish Holocaust 21 Feb 2011

The goal of my research in the UK is to further my knowledge in the areas relevant to the completion of a book (working title listed as Q2) on typhus disease and typhus vaccines during WWII. In addition I wish to examine special files that are relevant to the lives and times of my principal subjects, Ludwik Fleck and Rudolf Weigl. (see Q10) I will spend my research time in the UK on the following: --studying documents at the National Archive related to British wartime typhus vaccine preparations and typhus prevention policies, as well as postwar British evaluations of German typhus vaccines, disease experiences and the German military medical establishment. --studying personal files and interviews with Holocaust/WWII survivors at the Imperial War Museum, including Special Operations Executive members who were imprisoned at Buchenwald concentration camp and were protected through contacts in the typhus ward there. --reviewing documents made available to me by Oxford-Brookes Professor Paul Weindling, from his personal collection. These include interviews with wartime employees of Rudolf Weigl and testimony from erstwhile colleagues of Ludwik Fleck.

Amount: £1,841
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Misc United States

Trying and Trying and Trying extension. 21 Feb 2011

Gethan Dick will work with six UCL scientists to write six song poems, each one based on the experience and research of a single scientist. She will then work with six bands, each with their own fans and community of interest, to record the pieces. The songs will be made available for free on CD at a number of venues around London and wider afield, as well as via popular download sites. The final CD will feature text and images from each scientist as a response to the song poem about their work.

Amount: £2,725
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

For a meeting entitled 'Hearing the Voice: An international Interdisciplinary Workshop' to be held at Durham University on 24-25th November 12 Jul 2011

The primary objective of this workshop is to bring together recognized experts on auditory verbal hallucinations (?hearing voices?), including academic researchers from the sciences and humanities, mental health professionals, and the heads of leading service-user organizations. The workshop will be hosted by a team of Durham-based academics as part of the development of a large multidisciplinary project on voice-hearing. This gathering will have five further specific objectives: 1) To facilitate the dissemination of current leading research on voice-hearing in a range of disciplines, including clinical psychology, transcultural psychiatry, philosophy, cognitive neuroscience, anthropology, literary studies, theology, the arts and medical humanities 2) To facilitate the exchange of knowledge between disciplines 3) To reflect on the ways in which multi- and interdisciplinary approaches to the study of voice-hearing can further our understanding of its causes, meanings, and treatments 4) To establish an outline programme of multidisciplinary work on voice-hearing, leading to further collaborative grant applications 5) To engage service-users and service-user organizations in the design and implementation of research at its earliest stages

Amount: £4,366
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Durham

Art, medicine, nature: pursuing the imitation of nature in and beyond the Royal Academy of Arts 28 Mar 2011

The focus of this research project is the teaching and writings of Dr William Hunter (1718-1783). This proposal has two key goals. The first investigates Hunter's research on extinction in animal species which brought him into contact with George Stubbs (1724-1806) and Thomas Pennant (1726-1798). The 'collaboration' between these three individuals resulted in Hunter's paper, 'An Account of the Nyl-ghau, .. .', published in Philosophical Transactions, London 1771; Stubbs's paintings of The Nyl-ghau (1769) and The Moose (1770); and Pennant's Synopsis of Quadrupeds, Chester, 1771, where he incorporated Hunter's descriptions at pp. 55-56.1 Given the importance of these works, the goal is to discover further evidence of their associations within the fine arts in the late eighteenth century. The second goal is to consider such activities alongside Hunter's position as Professor of Anatomy at the Royal Academy of Arts as constituting a range of interests that stimulated and enriched the quality of Academic pedagogy in its early years and promoted knowledge of natural history by means of artistic endeavour.

Amount: £4,961
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Misc Scotland

"Daily life in the hospital: Theory and practice" to be held on 8-10 April 2011 at the University of Evora, Portugal. 19 Oct 2010

The sixth international conference of the INHH is inspired by the success of our meetings in Norwich, Verona, Montreal\ London and Barcelona. Our continuing aim is to address broad issues and themes in the history of hospitals within a wider social and cultural context. As on previous occasions, we plan to cover as wide a chronological and geographical remit as possible, from the ancient world up to the present century, and to encourage scholars new to the discipline. The main emphasis throughout the conference will be on daily life in the hospital, as . experienced by administrators and medical staff, as well as patients and their families. Given the location of the conference, one of the underlying themes will be links between the Iberian Peninsula and the New World.

Amount: £3,551
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of East Anglia

Script doctors and drug cultures: the prescribing of controlled drugs to addicts 1916-66 20 May 2011

The research I am undertaking traces the development of the heroin-using subculture in London from its beginnings on the Home Front of the First World War to its established form in the early 1960s. The project, primarily a work of cultural and medical history, entails an exploration of the conditions of possibility for this emergence: legal and medical controls, and new cultural norms promulgated by the popular media, each played a prominent formative role. It was against these forces that the subculture formed itself, seizing and redefining the pathologized, subaltern addict identity as the figure of the outsider in a conformist society. The subculture congealed around its own set of norms and attitudes, vocabulary, aesthetics, spaces, codes and rhythms. Both subculture and norm changed over time, each being redefined in relation to the other in an on-going historical process; these do not represent fixed, essential categories. 1. To explore the development of a heroin-using subculture in London, between 1916, when the Defence of the Realm Act or 'DORA' introduced the first serious legislative drug controls, and the early 1960s, when the subculture was firmly established as a distinct cultural grouping with its own style of life. 2. To delineate more precisely the role of the 'script doctor' in the fabrication of this subculture. The 'Script Doctor' is the prescribing doctor who pushes or transgresses the framework regulating the medical treatment of addiction.

Biomedical Vacation Scholarships. 06 Jun 2011

Not available

Amount: £1,440
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

Biomedical Vacation Scholarships 20 May 2011

Not available

Amount: £1,440
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Strathclyde

Biomedical Vacation Scholarships 20 May 2011

Not available

Amount: £1,440
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Loughborough University

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship. 20 May 2011

Not available

Amount: £1,440
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Warwick

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship. 20 May 2011

Not available

Amount: £4,320
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Queen's University Belfast

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship. 20 May 2011

Not available

Amount: £3,040
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Queen Mary University of London

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship. 20 May 2011

Not available

Amount: £2,880
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Aberdeen

Gene Silencing. 27 May 2010

Gene Silencing: I will write an original drama for radio that explores the impact of a genetic disease on a modern family. The script will illuminate the reality of living with a specific genetic disorder, Hunter Syndrome, the effects of which are highly visible; and will trace the social, ethical and emotional consequences of such a situation. The play will follow the life of the family over several years, beginning just before the moment of diagnosis; the family story is in its turn set against a broader societal context.

Amount: £4,239
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Misc Ireland

Professor Pillinger's adventures in stem cell science. 15 Dec 2009

Three quintessentially British eccentrics set off on a journey into the brave new world of stem cells. Hailed as the 21st century's "magic bullet"; stem cell research promised much, but has delivered little in the way of routine medical treatments. Professon Colin Pillinger, Britain's leading spaceman, was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis in 2005, and asks, 'can stem cells could provide a cure in my lifetime?' Or is progress is being delayed by 'NIMBY's', political obfuscation, or reluctant experimenters? With him go the Donald Bros; founding editors of irreverent magazine, Viz, providing their unique take on science using humorous cartoons.

Amount: £2,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: The (Multimedia) Refinery

Exploring images of the brain in popular culture; media analysis and neuroethics in drama. 14 Jun 2010

The proposed visit has two main aims. The first is to disseminate Interior Traces1 which uses multimedia drama to explore issues in neuroethics to the Canadian Neuroethics community and local public audiences. Dr Whiteley will run a series of screenings, targetingneurology and psychiatry residents, undergraduate students in medicine and law, members of NeuroDevNet2, and the general public, accompanied by Café Scientifique-style discussions. She will also give seminars, and gather feedback that will contribute to a journal submission on the use of fictional narratives to explore bioethical issues. The second aim is to extend Dr Whiteley's previous research on what the representation of brain imaging in popular culture might reveal about anxieties surrounding neural and genetic determinism and identity. She will write up existing research, and collaborate on a new project contributing to our ongoing work atthe National Core for Neuroethics, systematically examining the use of images on websites that sell direct-toconsumer scans and treatments for mental illness and neural disorder. Dr Whiteley's visit will thus contribute new perspectives to the local neuroethics community and public communication landscape, as well as extending her skills and publication record in neuroethics research.

Amount: £4,936
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of British Columbia