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The Wellcome Trust

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KCL - Oxford Symposium on Ethics of innovative technologies for improving health in low-income countries. 31 Aug 2016

Most new technologies to improve health are geared toward the needs and preferences of populations in high-income countries. In response, various efforts over the past decade have sought to take a ‘pro-poor’ approach in global health. This is particularly visible in E-Health and M-Health -- areas of medicine and public health practice aiming to improve health using mobile phones, computers, drones, satellites, big data analysis, and so forth. Such technologies aim to leapfrog infrastructure and resource scarcity and deliver healthcare to the poorest communities within low-income countries. However, there has been little effort to collect and examine the diverse ethical issues arising when deploying such innovative E/M-Health technologies in low-income countries. To begin engendering inter-disciplinary ethical reflection in this area, a one-day symposium will bring together scholars and practitioners in the fields of global health, innovative technologies, and health and development ethics. The specific aims include: a) Using recent cases, collectively identify new kinds of ethical problems arising from the intersection of new technologies and health interventions in resource poor settings. b) Begin developing a research agenda, and future collaborations. c) Engender a network across academic disciplines and institutions that could influence ethical design and deployment of pro-poor health technologies.

Amount: £2,700
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London

MetaboFlow - the development of standardised workflows for processing metabolomics data to aid reproducible data sharing and big data initiatives 16 Jun 2016

The processing and analysis of mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy data in metabolomics is largely performed on an individual basis following local laboratory methodologies. Metabolomics lacks reproducible computational workflows based on internationally accepted standard operating procedures and this is impacting on the field in terms of reproducibility of studies and subsequent sharing of data. Furthermore, with improvements in reproducibility in analytical equipment, individual laboratories are acquiring larger, more complex datasets, which are a significant challenge to process. We propose to build, test and deliver the cloud-based Galaxy workflow, MetaboFlow, which will have computational capacity to process datasets with 1000s of samples and simultaneously capture all metadata associated with the users’ data processing workflow to allow rigorous reproducibility. We will formulate the workflow using several popular processing, feature extraction and compound identification tools and provide functionality to readily use on-line databases including our international repository, MetaboLights. The tools will be selected based on our current survey of the international metabolomics community. This proposal is a re-submission following consultation with the Trust. Specifically we have developed and implemented a plan to capture the communities’ needs, and have made significant cost savings by integrating our work with other initiatives using Galaxy.

Amount: £190,915
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Birmingham

MetaboFlow - the development of standardised workflows for processing metabolomics data to aid reproducible data sharing and big data initiatives 16 Jun 2016

The processing and analysis of mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy data in metabolomics is largely performed on an individual basis following local laboratory methodologies. Metabolomics lacks reproducible computational workflows based on internationally accepted standard operating procedures and this is impacting on the field in terms of reproducibility of studies and subsequent sharing of data. Furthermore, with improvements in reproducibility in analytical equipment, individual laboratories are acquiring larger, more complex datasets, which are a significant challenge to process. We propose to build, test and deliver the cloud-based Galaxy workflow, MetaboFlow, which will have computational capacity to process datasets with 1000s of samples and simultaneously capture all metadata associated with the users’ data processing workflow to allow rigorous reproducibility. We will formulate the workflow using several popular processing, feature extraction and compound identification tools and provide functionality to readily use on-line databases including our international repository, MetaboLights. The tools will be selected based on our current survey of the international metabolomics community. This proposal is a re-submission following consultation with the Trust. Specifically we have developed and implemented a plan to capture the communities’ needs, and have made significant cost savings by integrating our work with other initiatives using Galaxy.

Amount: £124,821
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

Institutional Strategic Support Fund FY2013/14 14 Oct 2013

Neuroscience & Behaviour Leicester has clear strengths in neuroscience and behaviour research and our previous ISSF encouraged new appointments and substantial grant funding Genomes and ‘Big Data’ Genome variation and dynamics is a long-standing cornerstone of research excellence at Leicester. Stratified Medicine. Modern genomic and biomarker studies are revealing heterogeneity in susceptibility, prognosis and treatment responses of patients assigned to established diagnostic groups. Our previous ISSF award allowed us to invest in next generation sequencing and proteomic infrastructure to interrogate this heterogeneity Public Health Our Population Science and Diabetes research themes are central to Leicester’s contribution in bridging the second translational gap, converting preclinical and clinical research into public health outcomes. (ii) Facilitation of collaborative initiativesLeicester’s biomedical research strategy is driven through our College research themes. However, all themes have affiliates from other Colleges, with a specific Life-Sciences Interface Theme crossing our College and the College of Sciences and Engineering (iv) Public engagement strategyOur new ISSF award will allow us to develop and deliver a more focused public engagement (PE) strategy that will build upon the previous general good practice within our College. We will develop a coordinated plan via two complementary mechanisms

Amount: £500,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leicester

100 MINUTES TO SAVE THE WORLD (W/T) 07 Sep 2017

We propose a dazzlingly-ambitious, definitive, widely-accessible feature-length documentary about the threat posed by Anti-Microbial Resistance. The AMR story has never been told as a single definitive, compelling narrative for a worldwide audience. We want to trigger a global conversation on social media about how to tackle the crisis. Engagement with the leading authorities on AMR will inform our research. Stories from the front lines - whether a Mumbai street or a new York lab - will come alive through intimate, illuminating personal narratives that will put a lump in your throat and get your mind racing. Spectacular visuals will reveal our connected, networked planet, where the threats but also the solutions are global and shared. Innovative integration of CGI with live action will give us visual devices we can use to tell the macro and micro levels of the story. Our proven skills in giving documentary an urgent, cinematic feel will result in a uniquely watchable "big screen" experience. We envisage a cinema release, followed by global television releases and ultimately a permanent home online. Creation of shareable, viral stories will begin during production and build social media momentum, enhanced by buy-in from a few selected stars and celebrities.

Amount: £100,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: AMOS Pictures Ltd

SONIC 31 Mar 2017

We intend to make a popular, mass-market science-fiction feature film called ‘Sonic’, about alien craft that invade Britain and use resonance and sonics to probe and experiment, and a profoundly deaf teenager who alone holds the key to understanding this alien technology and saving the world. Our movie will be relevant to everyone who enjoys exciting, original science fiction. We aim to make a sophisticated but accessible film that immerses hearing people in the deaf experience, portrays contemporary deaf life in a realistic, un-condescending way, and presents science and technology in a credible but spectacular manner. This movie can serve as a gateway to learning about the true, awesome capabilities of sonics and resonance. It can also put the modern deaf experience on screen, as part of a human story that’s larger than the condition itself. We want to change people’s perception of deafness, and excite and educate people about a field of science that is all around them but of which they might not be fully aware, as well as making a successful British feature film that’s both emotionally intimate and immensely cinematic.

Amount: £10,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Big Talk Pictures

A Cluster for the Development of Dynamic 3D Nanoscopy 05 Jul 2016

Imagine if we could watch multiple molecules in living cells as they move and interact. This dream may seem years away, but it is now realistic to achieve real-time dynamic super-resolution imaging of multiple tagged proteins in three dimensions (3D) in cells and in tissues. This will allow biologists to discover large-scale patterns involving diverse structures including transport vesicles, ribosomes, and chromatin domains, all previously inaccessible because they lie in the gap between the resolution of electron (1- 2 nm) and light microscopy (200-300 nm). The "big picture" of cellular organization/information processing would emerge, with advances in understanding cell function in health and disease. While we can now do this in 2D, 3D imaging is needed to follow objects as they move out of the plane. Achieving 3D imaging is a major challenge and will require two orders of magnitude more information per cellular volume, and novel algorithms to classify, analyze, and visualize patterns from massive datasets. We propose specific innovations (Table 1) that, should allow us to achieve this over the next five years, given our team’s proven track record of success.

Amount: £729,183
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Health and economic benefits of water-sensitive revitalisation in informal urban settlements 06 Oct 2016

Urbanisation is a major demographic trend globally. Informal settlements account for much urban growth, exacerbating the inextricably linked challenges of sanitation, water provision, and public health. The conventional ‘big pipes’ solution to these challenges has changed little in 150 years, comes at major financial, environmental, and social costs, and frequently overlooks informal settlements. We have pioneered an alternative, water-sensitive approach that integrates sustainable design with the management of the water-cycle, benefiting human health and urban ecosystems. This decentralised, climate-change sensitive approach provides financial flexibility for multistage developments and adaptability to future technologies. It promises a solution to the water services challenges of informal settlements, yet has only been demonstrated in developed world settings. We will examine whether the water-sensitive approach can be applied to revitalise developing-world informal settlements to improve environmental and public health outcomes. Our evidence-based assessment of its efficacy across 24 settlements, poorly served by water infrastructure in Makassar and Suva, will deliver the first public health and environmental data on the benefits and risks of water-sensitive approaches. Our scientific, economic and implementation findings will provide the basis for profound changes to infrastructure policies, investments, loan strategies, and their sustainability across the Asia-Pacific and the developing world.

Amount: £364,741
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

THE PHYSIOLOGICAL ROLE OF CLATHRIN LIGHT CHAIN DIVERSITY IN VERTEBRATES. 07 Jul 2015

Clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs) influence cell-cell interaction for all eukaryotic organisms by mediating membrane traffic pathways that control receptor expression and organelle formation. The biochemistry of how clathrin polymerizes into a lattice to form a CCV is understood at a basic level, but how CCVs meet the transport challenges posed by specialized cargo and membrane variation in different vertebrate tissues is not fully defined. It is known that adaptor molecules incorporated into the clathrin coat are variable and have variable cargo specificity. However, recent studies suggest a new paradigm in which properties of the clathrin lattice itself, conferred by the light chain subunits, also influence coat selection of cargo. Although identified as obligate clathrin subunits 35 years ago, the functions of the clathrin light chains (CLCs), which display tissue-specific isoform variation, are not fully established. The emerging role for CLCs in a novel coat function and their ti ssue variability beg the overall question addressed here: How does the CLC component of the clathrin coat affect cargo transport and influence the physiological function of clathrin in vertebrates? Specific questions to be addressed through protein chemistry, cell biology and mouse genetics are Question 1: How do CLC isoforms affect the biochemical properties of clathrin? Question 2: How do CLCs affect cargo specificity of CCV transport? Question 3: How does CLC variability influenc e vertebrate tissue morphology and function?

Amount: £51,200
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Institutional Strategic Support Fund 2011/12. 17 Oct 2011

Recruitment and Career Development ISSF has funded start-up packages (equipment, PhD studentships, laboratory consumables and relocation costs) for the recruitment of outstanding biomedical researchers. These new recruits work across cell and molecular biology, bacteriology, immunology, parasitology and drug discovery. The ISSF has also been used to provide bridging support for researchers experiencing short-term funding gaps. This flexible and reactive support has enabled PhD students and investigators to generate data for key publications and successful grant/fellowship applications. Enhancement of Research Infrastructure The ISSF has supported our strategy to have innovative core facilities in key research areas and to develop computational and informatics resources that underpin our WT funded research. Software developers have been appointed to develop computational and informatics resources to support the outstanding mass spectrometry-based proteomics facility [http://www.lifesci.dundee.ac.uk/cast/fingerprints-proteomics-facility] in the School of Life Sciences. Novel ways of managing, visualising and analysing ‘big data’ in the field of quantitative proteomics have been developed, in addition to a customised Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS). Translational Research A flexible Translation Medical Research Fund (TMRF) was used to link the strongest basic and clinical research across the University of Dundee (2011-2014). Funding was awarded on a competitive basis and 25 different projects have been supported including; Pump-priming projects, Strategic projects that benefitted several groups across the University and increase overall institutional competitiveness in translational research; and translational medicine (non-clinical) PhD projects. Public Engagement The ISSF supports community engagement activities targeted at the next generation of scientists to enhance a culture of curiosity, confidence and engagement with science with our communities. A key aim is to increase awareness of Life Sciences Research in schools in areas of social deprivation to promote widening of access to opportunities in science. ISSF funds support the appointment of a School Outreach Organiser (this post greatly increases the quality and scope of our work and supports public engagement activities of our WT funded researchers); school projects; city and rural Science Festivals, the Dundee Women in Science Festival; projects to translate science into public art; an interactive display at the Dundee Science Centre; a Life Sciences career paths booklet and website (through interviews, time-lines and photographs); Open Doors Days; Magnificent Microbes and Marvellous Microbes activities; Café Science; Bright Club science comedy; public talks and debates. The impact of activities is assessed by questionnaires and reflective feedback discussions with stakeholders. We plan a quarterly public survey in Dundee to capture audience knowledge of the Life Science Research and Wellcome Trust activities. This will give us a measure of whether public engagement activities are reaching the community.

Amount: £1,000,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Dundee

The Archaeology of Medicine Roadshow - Extension. 30 Aug 2013

The Archaeology of Medicine Road-show examines the historical impact of biomedical science by providing an interactive educational experience to fifteen schools across Cheshire & Merseyside to inform and educate approximately 1800 Key Stage 3 pupils and 11,000 members of the public about the history & archaeology of Roman and Anglo-Saxon medicine and medical practices in Britain from AD 43-1066. The project aims to foster interdisciplinary collaboration, being developed in partnership with educ ational experts, archaeologists, osteoarchaeologists and Museum practitioners and teachers. It will explore the historical impact of biomedical science, considering ideas and attitudes towards health, medicine and the human body in both Roman and Anglo-Saxon society. The project will create a range on multi-sensory, hands-on activities to allow young people to learn how medicine was practiced in Britain, what cures the practitioners of the day used, what factors affected how long people lived and the state of their health compared to life in the 21st century. This unique approach will reach new audiences not normally engaged with biomedical science. Upon completion of the school visits, the project will tour for five weekends in public sites, including the Museum of Liverpool, Birkenhead Priory & Museum and Epiacum Roman Fort. This unique approach will allow us to reach new audiences not normally engaged with biomedical science whilst testing new methods of engagement, participa tion and education. The Archaeology of Medicine Roadshow will provide a lasting legacy through the creation of a schools loan box and website offering educational resources.

Amount: £18,880
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Big Heritage CIC

Does neonatal BCG vaccination produce short and longer-term protection againstheterologous invasive infectious disease by enhancing the innate immune system? 30 Aug 2013

Bacillus-Calmette Guerin (BCG) vaccination at birth has been shown to reduce all-cause mortality in the neonatal period in low-birth-weight infants in a high-mortality setting. This is believed to occur due to broad protection against heterologous pathogens, but no biological mechanism has been elucidated. Epidemiological evidence suggests that this enhanced protection also occurs in term infants and persists long-term. This study will investigate short and longer-term alterations in the innate immune system response to non-mycobacterial pathogens induced by neonatal BCG vaccination. A single-blind, randomised controlled trial of BCG vaccination at birth vs. BCG vaccination at seven weeks of age will be conducted on 560 Ugandan infants. This will compare BCG vaccinated/unvaccinated infants until seven weeks of age and early/delayed BCG vaccination subsequently. The intervention groups will be compared shortly after vaccination and at distant time-points to assess differences in 1) innate cytokine levels following in-vitro stimulation with various pathogens and 2) inflammatory alterations in the hepcidin-iron axis. The potential for BCG-induced epigenetic modification of macrophages to produce long-term up-regulation of the innate immune response against heterologous pathogens will also be investigated. Discovery of a broadly protective effect of neonatal BCG vaccination would have profound implications for public healthcare policy.

"Thinking with insects: Entomological reflections on history, medicine and politics" to be held at LSHTM on 21-23 May 2010. 30 Nov 2009

Knowledge about insects has informed models and manipulations of human societies; from apiary-inspired labour reform in Victorian Britain to large-scale resettlement schemes for controlling sleeping sickness in colonial Africa. This workshop will bring together scholars from the natural and social sciences doing innovative work on the intersections of insect and human worlds. In many ways, entomology is a political science par excellence; insect knowledge is enmeshed with the problems of governance, population welfare and ecological stewardship. Insect interventions- vector control, pest eradication, specimen collection, colony cultivation- register the evolving relationship between science, society, and technology. Combining historical and sociological insights with the experiences of entomologists, this meeting will explore the political dimensions of insect-knowledge, probing the question, "how can we think with bugs?" Historians of medicine and public health are in a central position both to contribute to and benefit from these discussions. From the emergence of tropical medicine to contemporary global philanthropic projects for public health, insects and their control have played a central role in the promotion of wellbeing. Through the help of insects we hope to develop new social concepts, analytical vocabularies, and methodological approaches to understand the production, uses and implications of insect-knowledge.

Experiencing Koro: On the Margins of Chinese Culture and Western Psychiatry. 17 Sep 2012

This proposal is for conducting preliminary research, writing, and presenting on a project that examines the history of transcultural psychiatry through the lens of the genealogy of a clinical diagnosis known as koro. Koro entered the DSM-IV as a paradigmatic culture-bound syndrome in 1994, and it refers to a persons overpowering belief that his genitalia is retracting and even disappearing. Up to the mid-1960s, doctors believed that this syndrome primarily affected Han Chinese. This view beg an to break down when koro epidemic struck various Southeast Asian countries starting in the late 1960s, involving masses of non-Chinese people, and, eventually, Western African nations by the 1990s. From the start, psychiatrists in Taiwan and Hong Kong have framed koro as a Chinese-style somatization of Western notions of sexual psychogenic illnesses, such as homosexuality, but its international epidemiological inflection continues to offset their ethnically, nationally, and culturally-based e xplanations. Drawing on local archival sources in East Asia, this study aims to chart these interregional historical tensions over time and the increasing pertinence of koro conceptualization to the international professionalization of transcultural psychiatry. The grant will be used for visiting archival holdings in Taiwan and for presenting working papers at various seminars and conferences thereafter.

Amount: £5,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Warwick

Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition. 29 May 2009

The Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition is a very high-profile annual event that showcases UK science and technology. Only twenty exhibits, demonstrating the cutting edge of research, are accepted every year from UK universities. This year, the University of Bristol has succeeded in securing the selection of two exhibits; we are the only institution to do so. These are: "The Palaeodetectives: Digging up small molecules with big messages from the past" and "The Chewing Robot: A new biologically-inspired way to test dental materials".

Amount: £10,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Bristol

Correlates of immunity and the influence of co-infections on protection against infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis following BCG immunisation at birth. 02 Oct 2008

This project will employ an established, Wellcome Trust-funded birth cohort to address new goals suggested by recent evidence of a protective effect of BCG against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. These goals are: First, to determine the prevalence of M. tuberculosis infection among 1000 five-year-olds who received BCG immunisation at birth, using an RD1-ELIspot assay to detect responses to M. tuberculosis-specific antigens. Within this goal we will explore interpretation of RD1-ELIspo t results for population studies by comparing responses to RD1 and latency antigens (presumed to characterise active and dormant mycobacteria, respectively), and by examining effects of prophylactic isoniazid therapy. Second, to determine BCG-induced profiles of cytokine response to mycobacterial antigens that are associated with subsequent M. tuberculosis infection, using results of whole blood assays conducted within the host cohort. Cytokine profiles at age one year will be compared betwe en children who are infected or uninfected at five years, as defined in goal one. Third, to determine the effects of co-infections on prevalence of M. tuberculosis infection at age five years and, if effects are observed, to explore whether these are mediated by effects on BCG-induced cytokine responses. Effects of helminths, malaria, maternal HIV infection and herpes virus infections will be examined.

Proliferation and death of T-cell subsets following vaccination. 12 Jul 2006

The kinetics of T-cell proliferation and death following vaccination in humansare poorly understood. There is an immense effort underway to develop a new generation of vaccines to generate protective T-cell responses against a number of key pathogens responsible for morbidity and mortality on a massive scale. A greater understanding of the processes that lead to effective and durable memory could have a major impact on the design of new vaccines and theimmunization regimes, perhaps allowing development of new adjuvants that enhance survival of memory T-cells following the initial 'burst' response.Labelling dividing cells with deuterium presents a new, safe, radiation-free method of measuring kinetics of antigen-specific T-cells and their subsets. I propose to use this technique to measure T cell responses induced by the tuberculosis vaccine MVA85A in eight healthy BCG-primed volunteers.I will also study apoptosis of vaccine-induced T cells following vaccination with new malaria and tuberculosis vaccines using an apoptosis assay and caspase activation assay. This research will utilise samples from twelve volunteers in upcoming studies in the Oxford clinical trials programme.I also plan to use anti-apoptotic agents in vitro to try modifying this process to increase the size of the resulting memory pool.

Amount: £242,111
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Time series models of genome-wide expression patterns. 12 Jun 2006

Time series models of genome-wide expression patterns This research project will focus on using and developing time series models for modelling genome-wise expression patterns. In particular, state-space models will be investigated to analyse the dynamics of gene expression profiles. These models assume that the observed measurements depend on some hidden state variables that evolve according to Markovian dynamics. The hidden variables can capture effects that cannot be measured in a gene expression profiling experiment, e.g., genes that have not been included in the microarray, levels of regulatory proteins, the effects of messenger RNA and protein degradation, etc. System estimation and identification is usually achieved, in a maximum likelihood framework, using the EM algorithm or, in a fully Bayesian setting, using Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. An important aspect that will be considered relates to model choice and selection. For instance, if the true structure underlying the data changes, over time, then standard dynamic linear models may fail to accurately estimate the dynamics. To attack this problem, dynamic models with Markov switching will be considered. The statistical methodology developed above will be tested on two data sets that have been made available. The first data set is intended to explore the differences between tuberculin positive and tuberculin negative individuals consisting of 5 so-called "killers" and 4 "non-killers". Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) was added to blood samples and microarrays taken at 0, 2, 4, 8, 12, 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours. The analysis of these data sets is particularly problematic as a range of microarray layouts were used and the number of time points varies across individuals. The second data set consists of 9 patients, 3 with previous pulmonary tuberculosis, 3 with previous tuberculous meningitis and 3 mantoux positive controls. Microarrays were taken at 0, 2, 6, 12, and 24 hours. The data set is, by comparison, much cleaner with a single microarrray layout used throughout and no missing time points. The developed statistical methods will also be tested on publicly available data that have been previously analysed, and whose findings have been published, for comparative purposes.

Amount: £141,262
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Imperial College London

Bridging the gap - dialogue between rural livestock owners and animal health researchers in East Africa (BTG). 18 Aug 2006

The overall goal of the Bridging the Gap project is to develop and test an innovative model of dialogue and learning between rural livestock owners and animal health researchers to improve animal health research, making it more demand driven, dynamic, inclusive and relevant to rural livestock owners in East Africa. The primary target audiences will be pastoralists, smallholder livestock keepers, community based animal health workers (CAHWs) and animal health researchers in the four project countries. Influential policy makers will be a secondary target group. Objectives: To build an innovative and practical dialogue and learning process between livestock owners and animal health researchers in each of four East African countries. To promote animal health research which responds to the needs of rural livestock owners and encourages their participation in the gathering and analysis of research data. To promote knowledge transfer and uptake of newly emerging technologies from animal health research to rural livestock owners in a format that is accessible and appropriate at the grassroot level. To build the capacity of CAHWs and livestock owners to articulate their needs and represent their views to academic researchers and others. To document and disseminate the best practice of this dialogue and learning model with other stakeholders. To establish reasons why researchers do not have or maintain contact with livestock keepers. The objectives will be met by collating new and refining existing information from partner organisations as well as generating information from the grassroot target groups. This will be packaged into MP3 video podcast format for dissemination. FARM-Africa staff working within the Community Animal Health Network (CAHNET) and Training and Advisory Unit (TAU) programmes will be in the forefront to implement the project. CAHNET will take a co-ordinating role and together with the country TAUs collect, package and disseminate the information using various target audience forums like focal farmer/CAHWs groups and researcher/policy makers workshops.

Amount: £116,440
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Farm Africa, Kenya