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Recipients:
University College London
University of Cambridge
Amounts:
£1,000 - £5,000

Results

Volunteers in biomedical research: social science perspectives. 14 Dec 2005

Volunteers in Biomedical Research: Social Science Perspectives The aim of this meeting is to bring together academics who are specifically interested in exploring what it means to be a volunteer from the volunteers' perspective. While many of the researchers in the field are London-based, there has been little opportunity for all to meet in a single forum. The workshop will develop ideas and collaborative links for future work, build capacity in the UK social science community, and explore how this area of research can engage with current debates in science policy and research governance. Although UK government policy now puts a strong emphasis on public participation in research governance, there remains little discussion on the participatory role of volunteer human subjects. There are questions too about how adequately current codes of medical ethics function in practice and how they can accommodate the idea of more actively participative volunteers. The proposed workshop and its outputs could contribute to moving forward these issues. Topics to be addressed will include: the researcher-subject relationship; volunteers' understandings of research design and the implications for informed consent; volunteer motivation to participate; historical perspectives on volunteers' self-understanding; the significance of discourse around the 'volunteer', 'participant' or 'subject'; the possibilities for volunteers to influence the design and development of research. The meeting fits specifically with the objective of the Wellcome Biomedical Ethics programme to "build and enhance national capacity in the field". Some of the invited participants are working specifically within the programme's focus, looking at volunteering in relation to genetics (especially genetic databases) and neuroscience (especially brain imaging); others are working on the role of volunteers in a diverse range of the biomedical sciences. This meeting is specifically concerned with qualitative studies of volunteers' own experiences and understandings, and to this extent we are not aware of any recent meetings on this emerging field of science.

Amount: £2,880
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

'Epidemics in South Asian History: A review of medical, political and social responses' conference to be held in Burdwan, India on 7th, 8th and 9th November 2006. 08 Feb 2006

Epidemics in South Asian History: A review of medical, political and social responses A lot of the valuable research that this meeting will showcase is being carried out by staff in the smaller South Asian universities, whose contributions are often ignored in well-known publications; similarly, many UK-based associations for the study of the history of medicine remain unaware of the range and richness of this work, generally to their own disadvantage. This situation generally exists because scholars attached to the smaller South Asian universities have relatively weak links with the major international communities of historians of medicine, particularly those in the UK and Europe, where there has been a great interest in the subject over the past two decades. Apart from seeking to redress this situation, the proposed meeting also aims to highlight the significance of the study of the history of medicine at a university where a notable level of commitment towards the subject already exists. A joint meeting with the Wellcome Trust Centre would help advertise Burdwan University's efforts to propagate the post-graduate study of the history of medicine, science and technology, which would be useful both nationally and internationally. It is hoped that Burdwan University's efforts will receive greater publicity through a major international conference, which is likely to stoke greater government support for these educational ventures (activities in Burdwan University do not go unnoticed by the Government of West Bengal, which funds educational activities through the state). Burdwan University's intellectual resources could be useful to UK-based historians of medicine, as it offers the possibility of creating new collaborations and an effective base for Wellcome Trust-funded scholars seeking to carry out research in the region (research visas need to be sponsored by recognised universities and the university's department of history could be very helpful in this regard). Burdwan's history department is in keeping with the Wellcome Trust Centre agenda of seeking to expand interest in the history of medicine internationally; a goal in sync with the Wellcome Trust's history of medicine division's own goals.

Amount: £3,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

'Medicine and science in the multinational empires of Central and Eastern Europe, ca. 1800-1918' workshop to be held at the University of Cambridge on 23rd June 2006. 22 May 2006

Conference: Historians examining the interaction between Western science and medicine and imperialism have shown how Western powers employed science and medicine to reinforce their rule and propagate their culture in the countries they colonized in the quest for cheap raw materials and new markets. They have, furthermore, highlighted how the new economic and social organization in the colonies affected the health of populations and how, simultaneously, Western medicine itself was profoundly reshaped by encounters with new cultures, diseases and medical practices. These studies have opened important questions that underpin the current debates about science and medicine in the post-colonial and post-Cold war world. Yet they are exclusively based on non-European colonies of Western powers, in particular Britain, and consequently failed to offer explanatory frameworks for the role of science and medicine in the expansion and maintenance of two geographically contiguous empires of Central and Eastern Europe: the Habsburg Empire and Russia. Little historical attention has been given to the ways in which the multiethnic and multicultural environments of these empires shaped medical and scientific practices. Yet the historical legacy of these empires continues to influence medicine and science in successor countries in the region. The workshop will cover the following topics: The relationship between national politics and competing views on medical education, research and practice The impact of the multilingual environment on the clinical treatment and research practices The role of sciences of race in the maintenance and expansion of the two empires The question of the dominant language of science and its role in the building of intellectual networks in the region Through the example of architectural solutions for medical institutions and their regional variations, it will reassess the centre/periphery model.

Amount: £1,305
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

The roles of glial cells in models of neurodegenerative disease. 14 Dec 2005

My own work, using fluorescent imaging techniques during the rotation project, showed that Ab increases ROS generation by activation of the NADPH oxidase in BV2 cells and that inhibition of the CLIC1-mediated chloride conductance - with IAA-94, by transfecting cells with an siRNA against the CLIC1 protein or by substitution of Cl with non-permeant anions almost completely prevents that response. We propose that the activity of the NADPH oxidase is limited by charge compensation and that the chloride conductance plays a key role in augmenting the activity of the enzyme by providing a route for the compensation of electron flow across the membrane. CLIC1 is also expressed in astrocytes, but at present we have no data regarding its possible functions. The functions of this CLIC1-mediated chloride conductance, its mode of activation, the means by which its inhibition can reduce ROS production and neuronal death and its potential ubiquity and general importance in glial cell physiology will form the basis of the research to be undertaken during the course of this PhD.

Amount: £4,890
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

The 2nd Annual Postgraduate Bioethics Conference: 'Why bioethics? Our research in context'. 30 Jan 2007

The 2nd Annual Postgraduate Bioethics Conference: 'Why Bioethics? Our research in context' This meeting follows last year's inaugural postgraduate bioethics conference, 'Bioethics: Past, Present and Future', held at the University of Birmingham and funded by the Wellcome Trust. This meeting will bring together participants who will inevitably have strengths in quite different disciplines, and will thus provide the opportunity for people to mutually inform each other of their areas of expertise. The meeting has been carefully structured so that the focus is on interaction and discussion between all participants, both during the conference itself, and in the social events outside of it. Keynote speakers will open and close the conference, giving presentations focused on the meeting's key theme, and providing time for discussion. The content of the conference will be broad, and structured according to the interests of those participating. Presentation sessions will be tailored to these interests, with each session being preceded by a plenary paper designed to stimulate discussion about the ways that the foundations and implications of bioethical research might be thought about. We consider this broad scope to be a significant strength of the conference. By situating personal projects within a wide-range of different areas of interest, and the methodological and theoretical assumptions that underpin such areas, an interdisciplinary overview of a rapidly developing field will help to widen the narrow focus of doctoral and masters research projects. Equally, this approach will provide young researchers with a breadth of thinking that is vital for a successful academic career in this field. Building on last year's initiative, we plan again to run an essay competition designed to raise awareness of bioethics in schools. If bioethics is to gain a footing as a discipline in its own right, raising awareness of the issues it incorporates at this level of the educational system is essential.

Amount: £4,555
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

'Ancient Medicine Panels, Classical Association Conference 2007' to be held at the University of Birmingham from 12-15 April 2007. 19 Feb 2007

Ancient Medicine Panels, Classical Association Conference 2007 The two panels contain papers from various classical disciplines - history, literary studies, archaeology - and cover a large part of the ancient time period. This illustrates the versatile character of the study of ancient medicine, and will help to strengthen its position in the field of classics. List of topics to be covered: Patricia Baker (University of Kent): "Medicine in the Western Roman Provinces: The Body as a Measure of Interaction and Identity" Jane Barton (University of Oxford): "Medical and Magical Papyri in Theory and Practice" Todd Curtis (University of Newcastle): "An Introduction to Perception: Didactic and Rhetorical Strategies in Galen's De pulsibus ad tirones" Jessica Hughes (University of Cambridge): "The Archaeology of Pain" Maithe Hulskamp (Uniersity of Newcastle: "Reading the Signs: The Art of Interpreting Symptoms in Hippocratic Medicine" Charlotte Stickley (University of Newcastle): "Ivy in the Myth and Madness of Dionysus" Laurence Totelin (University of Cambridge): "Playing with Names: Personal Names in Greco-Roman Pharmacological Recipe Collections"

Amount: £1,137
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

Student Elective Prize for Mr Joel Wann Ee Chin 29 Aug 2008

Development of a trial audit for a pilot study on the use of Isoniazid Preventive Therapy in Zambia.

Amount: £1,500
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

Student Elective Prize for Mr Thomas Edward Parks 29 Aug 2008

Rates of Misdiagnosis of Acute Rheumatic Fever at Regional Health Centres in FIJI

Amount: £1,600
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

Student Elective prize for Ms Johanna Reed 29 Aug 2008

A study of Genetic Disease amongst the Amish Population of Ohio USA

Amount: £1,600
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

Student Elective Prize for Ms Meha J Bhayani 29 Aug 2008

A clinical research project to investigate the cardiac reviews and outcomes of patients with hereditary neuromuscular disease.

Amount: £1,300
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London