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Recipients:
University College London
Amounts:
£500 - £1,000
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Revisiting Jebel Moya: Social and biological evolution in south-central Sudan 06 Jun 2011

Description of the project and its relevance Jebel Moya is a combined cemetery and settlement locality in the south-central Sudan which was excavated in the early 20th century by the founder of the Wellcome Trust, Sir Henry Wellcome. The excavation was overseen by different field directors, employing variable excavation, recording and surveying techniques, over the course of the four seasons from January 1911 - April 1914. Plans for further expeditions were first placed on hold by the outbreak of World War I and subsequently ended by Sir Henry's death in 1936. Around a fifth of the estimated 10.4 hectares of deposits were excavated. It still stands as one of the largest British excavations ever undertaken in Africa and one of the largest cemeteries yet excavated in North-East Africa. Overall, 2792 graves were excavated and recorded. A site report was eventually published by Frank Addison in 1949, followed by Ramkrishna Mukherjee, C. Rao and J. Trevor's 1955 analysis of the osteological remains. Limited re-analyses have since been conducted. Rudolf Gerharz (1994), Isabella Caneva (1991) and Joel Irish (2007). Gerharz only utilised the information contained in Addison's 1949 report, particularly the limited Registrar of Graves, to propose a new tentative chronology; he never re-examined any of the excavation records and materials firsthand. Caneva examined a small sample of pottery, curated at the British Museum, from the earliest settlement period. Irish looked at the remaining teeth to test Mukherjee's hypothesis on population heterogeneity. No previous study has re-examined the excavation records and materials to test the validity of the original site reports, and to re-analyse the social implications of the individual burial assemblages and distribution of graves. Furthermore, there has been no attempt to ascertain the probability of conducting radiometric dating on either the osteological or pottery remains, for example using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (organic materials) and Thermoluminescence (inorganic materials, including pottery). My accompanying paper from Sudan & Nubia (2009) provides a critical overview of the previous publications mentioned above, details my investigations to date, demonstrates that there remains much information to glean from studies of the materials - both skeletal and associated artefacts - and presents preliminary ideas resulting from analysing the grave card data which I am cataloguing into the first ever electronic database for the site. In addition, I am re-examining the excavated grave, settlement and skeletal materials firsthand. The majority of the grave objects? positions are recorded on the grave and anatomical cards, and also in Addison's register of graves. These factors are also being entered into the database under together with data on the strata, attitude of the burials and the condition of the skeletal remains. Furthermore, Dr Kevin MacDonald (Institute of Archaeology, UCL) will be assisting me in the Petrie and British Museums to analyse the associated settlement and grave pottery which is of chronological, spatial and social interest; this has never been comprehensively undertaken before. Moreover, as a result of research presented at the May 2009 Sudanese Archaeological Research Society's conference (British Museum), Professor Abdel Rahman Ali extended an open invitation to visit the National Museum of Sudan (Khartoum) and work on the housed Jebel Moya materials which remain unstudied. The accompanying Table 1, derived from Frank Addison's registrar of graves in his 1949 publication, summarises the distribution of the artefacts from Wellcome's expedition which are primarily held in museums in Cambridge, Khartoum and London.I will also be using the information provided in the archived records on the skeletal and associated grave artefacts to reconstruct behavioural patterns, social structures and population histories. The previous Jebel Moya publications did not adequately integrate different subsets of data, resulting in an incomplete reconstruction of the social and biological transformations which occurred over the millennia. Theoretical modelling of social and biological evolution has advanced considerably in the 60 years since Addison's publication. Mortuary systems can provide information on social variability through analysing spatial dimensions, in comparison with biological and cultural affiliations: human (biological) bodies are loci of identity at individual and group levels, and are situated within the wider culturally constructed landscape. Places were defined and made significant not just by their physical location but also by materiality, including the skeletal remains. There are two additional avenues which my research encompasses: bone chemistry and DNA analyses. The human skeletal and faunal remains are curated in the Duckworth Laboratory, Cambridge, and some are in a condition where bone chemical analyses could be attempted. Such analyses, if successful, would help shed light on marriage patterns and possible migratory patterns by disentangling intra-site and regional relationships, and also provide information on diet. DNA would help test previous hypotheses of genetic closeness in, for example, the proposed elite cemetery from the late first millennium BC. Dr Tamsin O'Connell (Wellcome Trust Research Fellow, MacDonald Institute) and Professor Martin Jones (Department of Archaeology) will be approached for their assistance. A third avenue, that of disease, could be looked at as a possible future research question. Therefore, the interdisciplinary approach which I employ involves interpreting the relationships between mortuary behaviour, memory and material culture by utilising aspects of bioarchaeology (such as radiocarbon dating and isotopic studies), ethnography, Wellcome's expedition records and the archaeological artefacts housed in different museums. The re-examination of the nature of burial distributions will assist in establishing relative chronologies of graves, cultural histories, patterns of pastoral migrations and interactions with the surrounding regions. There is also the possibility of conducting radiometric dating on appropriate skeletal remains in order to arrive at a firmer chronology than what is currently available. These avenues for research are also detailed in the sub-section 'What can be done with the data' in my accompanying paper.

Amount: £1,100
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Trying and Trying and Trying extension. 21 Feb 2011

Gethan Dick will work with six UCL scientists to write six song poems, each one based on the experience and research of a single scientist. She will then work with six bands, each with their own fans and community of interest, to record the pieces. The songs will be made available for free on CD at a number of venues around London and wider afield, as well as via popular download sites. The final CD will feature text and images from each scientist as a response to the song poem about their work.

Amount: £2,725
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Body Matters 13 Apr 2010

Body Matters' is an exhibition exploring how cutting edge research in science, medicine and archaeology taking place at UCL can change and challenge our perceptions of health-related issues. The exhibition will take an audience-based approach to communicate complex research in an attractive and accessible way to an adult audience with no specialist knowledge of some or all of these fields The exhibition is designed and curated by postgraduate Museum Studies students from UCL, and is part of a project which also includes an event to be held at the Science Museum's Dana Centre. The exhibition will be held in the Leventis Gallery of UCL's Institute of Archaeology and will run from May 2010 to April 2011. Audience research has shown that the audience will be largely adult and academic, but with no specialist knowledge of science, medicine or archaeology. The exhibition is open to UCL staff, students and visitors, and also to the public. We are seeking funding to assist us in creating an exhibition that is as attention-grabbing and inspiring as the research it is presenting, and to partially fund the private view, which will include the Director of the Science Museum and UCL's Vice Provost of Research as speakers.

Amount: £1,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Molecular and developmental alterations in circadian clock function in various strains of the Mexican blind cavefish, Astyanax mexicanus. 29 Mar 2010

A major environmental cue for most organisms is the daily cycle of light and darkness Consequently, most organisms have developed a system, synchronised by the light/dark cycle coordinating physiology and behaviour with the environment. This system is known as the circadian clock and was proposed to be a neural phenomenon residing in a region of the central nervous system: the SCN. Over the last decade, research has led to a decentralisation of the circadian clock with discoveries of independent peripheral oscillators both in vivo (Whitmore et al, 1998) and in vitro cell culture (Whitmore et al, 2000; Welsh et al, 2004). Additionally, zebrafish cells can detect light and use this to set the phase of the circadian clock. Recent research in our lab has begun to investigate the workings of the circadian clock in a species of fish that lives in perpetual darkness, and is therefore missing the major environmental cue for most living organisms. This work has been performed using the Mexican tetra, Astyanax mexicanus; a single teleost species consisting of a sighted surface-dwelling form and several independent cave dwelling forms. Cavefish have lost eyes and pigmentation, as well as gaining constructive feature: such as increased jaw size and taste bud number. Selective pressures for retaining light adaptive features such as pigmentation are relaxed in the absence of light, and it is believed that pigmentation is lost through neutral mutations in the Oca2 gene (Protas et al, 2006). Little research has been performed on circadian clocks in cave animals, and particularly not on cave animals with living con-specific surface dwelling ancestors. This is important because when the ancestral surface form is still present, a direct comparison can be made between ancestral and derived developmental states. Astyanax is thus an important model for understanding the molecular basis of developmental changes in the context microevolution. Jeffery suggested "cavefish can be compared with surface fish in essentially the same way as mutants are compared with wild-type phenotypes" (Jeffery, 2008). We possess a model in which we can investigate a range of clock phenotypes. We will use surface fish and the two different populations of cavefish (Pachon and Steinhard) in our proposed research to further understand clock mechanisms in a dark adapted animal and assess whether cavefish really are clock mutants. If they are mutants in the clock me

Amount: £4,680
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Loss of GABAergic cells and night-time hyperactivity in zebrafish mutants of autism risk genes 01 Apr 2016

<p>Night-time hyperactivity makes up part of the unique behavioural profile of autism spectrum disorder (ASDs). Recent studies on zebrafish revealed that loss-of-function mutations in autism risk genes (e.g.&nbsp;<em>CNTNAP2</em>)&nbsp;lead to a reduction in GABAergic neurons in the hypothalamus. GABAergic cells are sleep promoting and play an important role in the regulation of sleep-wake cycle. There are different subtypes of GABAergic cells, such as galanin-positive and MCH-positive neurons. In this project, we are going to investigate what subtypes of GABAergic cells are lost in autism mutants, using in situ hybridisation and basic microscopy. Significant difference in the amount of cells present in the wild-type and mutant will be expected.</p>

Amount: £2,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Investigating the development of visual object perception from noisy images 01 Apr 2016

<p>As we perceive the world, our brain continuously makes educated guesses about what we will see next. These inferences allow us to distinguish objects in our field of vision without having to examine every detail. This is known as the Bayesian model of visual perception. Recent evidence suggests that object recognition tasks for which such inferences are likely to be crucial may develop well into adolescence. There is anecdotal evidence that children find tasks such as identifying objects in poor lighting conditions or when borders are unclear (Bova, 2007) very difficult, even when they know exactly what the object they are looking for looks like (Yoon, 2007). This suggests that the robust object perception described in Bayesian models of the adult system takes surprisingly long to develop. This piece of research will test this hypothesis by (a) measuring children&rsquo;s ability to recognize objects in a distorted (&ldquo;noisy&rdquo;) image, and (b) testing how expectations about the objects (e.g. what it will look like) can improve perception. This aims to further our understanding of how the brain learns to use existing knowledge to interpret new sensory information, and make better inferences about the world.&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £2,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Use of Electrical Impedance Tomography in Detection of Acute Stroke 01 Apr 2016

<p>The key goal of my research is to determine whether a new Electrical Impedance Tomography system which has been developed at UCL, is suitable for use in imaging stroke patients. This system would provide a fast, safe, and inexpensive method of distinguishing between strokes resulting from cerebral ischaemia and haemorrhage. If the different types of stroke could be distinguished on site by paramedics it &nbsp;would enable treatment and 'clot busting' drugs to be administered immediately, increasing patient survival significantly.&nbsp;</p> <p>I will be conducting the final clinical studies of this system, on patients who are admitted to the Acute Admissions Unit at UCH.&nbsp;I will identify suitable patients who have suffered a stroke and, with consent, take readings using the new EIT system. The images produced will be optimised using newly developed techniques, and compared to MRI and CT images.&nbsp;</p> <p>After the main bulk of data collection, the rest of my project will involve refining the accuracy of the instrumentation, including calibration, assessment, and reduction of electrode noise. I will then analyse the data produced, using Matlab, and evaluate whether the new EIT system is suitable for use in clinical applications. &nbsp;</p>

Amount: £2,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Investigating the neural odometer function of entorhinal grid cells in rats navigating a multi-planar environment. 01 Apr 2016

<p>It has been proposed that the grid cell system in the medial entorhinal cortex acts as a &lsquo;neural odometer&rsquo;, encoding both distance travelled and an animal's position in space. These features may be necessary for spatial computations such as path integration, but the relationship of grid cell firing patterns to behaviour remains speculative. In not-yet-published work, it has been shown that for a rat climbing a wall with its body plane aligned vertically the grid fields are expanded, as if the cells underestimate distance travelled. If grid cells support spatial computations then rats should also underestimate distances in this plane. To test this hypothesis rats will learn a distance match-to-sample task leading to triangle completion while both sample and choice phases are in the same plane (both horizontal or both vertical). In probe trials, the sample will be horizontal but the choice vertical. Distance underestimation in the probe trials (walking too far on the vertical wall to achieve a match to the horizontal sample) will link grid cells to behaviour, while the basic distance-matching task will serve as a springboard for neurobiological studies investigating the role of grid cells in odometry generally.</p>

Amount: £2,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Harnessing Diversity Generating Retroelements (DGRs) for in vivo evolution 01 Apr 2016

<p>The goal of the project is to express the reverse transcriptase (RT), central to the Bordertella phage BPP-1 diversity generating retroelement (DGR), and test it for synthetic nucleic acid (XNA) synthesis as well as reverse transcription. In addition, I will focus on cloning the BPP-1 DGR elements into E. coli, creating a circuit where DGR function can activate a selectable marker (e.g. kanR). I will try and demonstrate that the BPP-1 DGR is active in E. coli and can be used as a tool for in vivo directed evolution.</p>

Amount: £2,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Improved High Frequency Calibration for Dosimetry in Focussed Ultrasound Surgery 01 Apr 2016

<p>Ultrasound at high intensities can cause tissue damage, therefore knowing the intensities used in clinical application is paramount. Ultrasound source outputs are calibrated using hydrophones, following a primary standard calibration at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in the UK. Yet uncertainty in the primary calibrations is surprisingly high: around 10% and growing with frequency (NPL 2014). The primary calibration uses optical interferometry for the measurements. This project will investigate one source of uncertainty in this procedure: the effect of the tension in the optically-reflecting membrane. The rig for these experiments will be designed and built following the design shown in Figure (1). There are three key goals:</p> <p>a) Create a measurement rig that can measure the normal incidence acoustic pressure transmission coefficient of a stretched mylar membrane as a function of frequency, membrane tension, and membrane thickness.</p> <p>b) Based on previous work in the literature (Thomas 1976; Romilly 1969; Lamb 1957; Ingard 1954; Chen et al. 2014), construct a mathematical and/or numerical model of the motion of a membrane under tension when a sound wave is incident, and make for comparison with the measurements.&nbsp;</p> <p>c) Formulate advice to the National Physical Laboratory on how to minimize this uncertainty.&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £2,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Epilepsy inducing mutation of the GABA-A receptor alpha 1 subunit 01 Apr 2016

<p>We will investigate how a newly discovered mutation to the GABA-A receptor alpha 1 subunit gene (<em>GABRA1</em>) is causing epilepsy in a young child. A single mutation has been identified, which resides in the receptor's first transmembrane domain. This is near&nbsp;the&nbsp;previously identifed neurosteroid binding site from which endogenous neurosteroids can positively modulate GABA-A receptor activity. To investigate the implications of this mutation we have formulated the following aims that will be addressed using heterologous expression of GABA-A receptors in a cell line:</p> <p>1. To establish the effect of the mutation&nbsp;on GABA concentration response curves and current voltage relationships for typical synaptic and extrasynaptic-type GABA receptors.</p> <p>2. To determine if known allosteric modulators of GABA-A receptors are affected by the alpha1 subunit mutation.</p> <p>3. To deduce if the expression levels and receptor mobility at the cell surface are affected by&nbsp;the&nbsp;alpha 1 subunit mutation.</p> <p>To achieve these goals, we will use a combination of patch clamp electrophysiology and single particle imaging techniques. This should establish whether the mutation is causing&nbsp;a gain- or loss-of function, or affects receptor trafficking.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £2,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

The Involvement of Ventral Hippocampal Circuitry in Social Interaction 01 Apr 2016

<p>The research project represents an initial investigation into the role of the diverse components of the ventral hippocampal circuitry in the context of social interaction.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The aim is to explore a potential correlation between complex behavioural patterns observed during social interaction tasks and degree of activation of ventral hippocampal neurons.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Behavioural assessment will only be carried out on single housed male mice to avoid sex-specific differences. During my experiments I will compare two contexts. First, as a control, mice will be placed in a test chamber with a novel object. Second, social interaction will be tested by introducing a juvenile male. The behavioural patterns generated will be scored and compared both qualitatively and quantitatively.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>After 90 minutes, the degree of activation&nbsp;of distinct ventral hippocampal areas (CA1, CA2, CA3, Dentate Gyrus and Subiculum) will be tested in each of these groups of mice using expression of the immediate-early gene <em>c-fos</em>&nbsp;(which is correlated to neuronal activation), by optimising immunohistochemical detection in the lab.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>I will then aim to establish the involvement of the ventral hippocampus in social interaction by&nbsp;using&nbsp;fluorescent microscopy analysis, followed by appropriate statistical testing between the control and social groups.&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £2,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Intracellular sodium and its effect on neuronal Gene Expression 01 Apr 2016

<p>This project will involve investigating the effects of intracellular sodium on the gene expression in Dorsal root ganglion neurons. The key aims of the project will be to determine the role of sodium mediated signalling in neuronal gene expression. To determine this, high affinity sodium binding protein will be investigated; a cloned DNA construct of the protein will be transfected in to HEK (Human Embryonic Kidney) cells and then DRG neurons with a Nav1.7 knock out. The effect of low intracellular sodium concentration on expression of <em>Penk </em>will be assesed by analysis of the DRG neurons.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £1,750
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

The Neuroscience of Nudge 01 Apr 2016

<p>Nudges are simple behavioural methods designed to influence decision making by taking advantage of people&rsquo;s implicit biases. One important type of nudge is known as &ldquo;anchoring.&rdquo;&nbsp; The simple presentation of an irrelevant number affects people&rsquo;s decisions by shifting estimations towards that number. This behavioural effect is well understood although the mechanism behind the unconscious bias remains unclear.&nbsp; The brain bases of this effect has received surprisingly little attention in the literature. One study found that the medial prefrontal cortex played a crucial role in anchoring theory-of-mind decisions in a social context, suggesting that activity within cortical networks intrinsic to the task is shaped by this extrinsic information. I propose to initiate this investigation by piloting an fMRI experiment to investigate the neural correlates of anchoring in reasoning about uncertainty. The aim is to collect a preliminary data set from a small sample of healthy adults (n=12) to explore whether the experimental paradigm: yields robust behavioural anchoring effects, identifies brain regions whose activity is affected by these anchoring effects, and tests whether these effects are parametric modulated.&nbsp;I predict that within prefrontal regions engaged by the task, I will observe parametric modulation based on the amplitude of the behavioural anchoring effect.&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £2,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Structural Basis of Gabapentinoid Drug Action 01 Apr 2016

<p>Gabapentinoids are blockbuster drugs used to treat conditions including neuropathic pain and epilepsy. They act by binding &alpha;2&delta; voltage-gated Ca<sup>2+</sup> channel subunits. The focus of this&nbsp;summer project is to investigate the structure of &alpha;2&delta; to help understand its role in presynaptic Ca<sup>2+</sup> entry and reveal the molecular basis of gabapentinoid binding.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>We have developed constructs for &alpha;2&delta; expression in High5 insect cells and HEK293T eukaryotic cells. We will express and purify different regions of &alpha;2&delta;, taking advantage of enzymes at our disposal for modifying glycosylation and pre-protein cleavage. Co-crystallisation screens will be set up with natural and synthetic small molecules including pregabalin and gabapentin. Successful crystal hits will be tested for x-ray diffraction using an in-house x-ray source. In the final fortnight of reserach, the student will perform crosslinking coupled to mass spectrometry experiments to determine the interaction sites of different subunits within the calcium channel complex, depending on the progress of crystallisation experiments.</p>

Amount: £2,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Combined liposomal delivery of small molecule and oligonucleotide therapeutics 01 Apr 2016

<p>Liposomal delivery of therapeutic agents, and/or imaging agents, is an important and rapidly emerging area which will have considerable impact on many disease areas including respiratory diseases, vaccine delivery and cancer. These liposome-based formulations are increasingly important for delivery and imaging of small molecule therapeutics, and for the delivery of plasmid DNA encoding for imaging agents or toxic genes, as they offer the benefits of cell-selective delivery with minimal off-target effects. However, to date it has not been possible to formulate both small molecule therapeutics and plasmid DNA in the same nanoparticle delivery system. The aim of this research is to develop multifunctional nanoparticles for liposomal delivery of both a small molecule therapeutic and plasmid DNA. This will have the advantage of delivering two different therapies to the same diseased cell, ensuring more rapid therapeutic effect and minimising the development of resistance to each individual therapeutic intervention.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £2,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Pathophysiological consequences of mutations affecting the mitochondrial calcium uptake pathway 01 Apr 2016

<p>Mitochondrial calcium uptake plays critical roles in cellular energy homeostasis. Alterations both in mitochondrial function and in cellular calcium signals play major roles in the pathophysiology of many major diseases, including ischaemic injury, neurodegenerative and neuromuscular diseases.&nbsp; The very recent discovery of the proteins mediating mitochondrial calcium uptake provides a new opportunity to understand the physiological roles of the pathway and pathological consequences of its dysfunction, as seen in patients with mutations of MICU1 described by the host lab. The patients have learning difficulties, muscle weakness and a progressive extrapyramidal motor disorder. The mechanism whereby mutations of MICU1 cause this particular constellation of symptoms are not understood.&nbsp; We will use iPS cells which we have generated from patient derived fibroblasts, differentiated into neurons and myotubes &ndash; the tissues most affected in the patient &ndash; and explore the consequences of MICU1 mutations for mitochondrial calcium signalling and for mitochondrial bioenergetic function. The project will illuminate the underlying mechanisms causing symptoms in the patients and point the way to therapeutic strategies.</p>

Amount: £2,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Cloning of a galactosyl transferase gene promoter to understand the mechanism linking genetic variation to the altered enzyme activity found in IgA nephropathy 01 Apr 2016

<p>IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common glomerulonephritis and is a major cause of kidney failure worldwide. IgAN is characterised by abnormal deposition of galactose-deficient IgA (Gd-IgA) in the kidney, and levels of Gd-IgA are raised in the serum of patients, with levels correlating with clinical outcomes [1, 2].</p> <p>Why some people have elevated Gd-IgA is unknown, but we have shown that Gd-IgA levels are highly heritable [3, 4] and recently performed a genome wide association study (GWAS) that showed that the presence of a haplotype<em>&nbsp;</em>across a particular galactosyl transferase gene is strongly correlated with Gd-IgA level (p&lt;10<sup>-10</sup>), implying that common genetic variation across the locus modulates enzyme activity in the population. Fine mapping of the locus using imputed genotypes, and consultation of available expression &nbsp;quantitative trait loci (eQTL) maps disclosed the set of common variants across the region that might explain the effect, and we now wish to understand the mechanism linking the known genetic variation with altered enzyme activity. The aim of this project is to clone the promoter region of the gene from individuals with and without the associated haplotype for studies using a reporter gene to assess promoter activity of different allotypes.&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £2,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

A cross-cohort comparison of unhealthily low BMI in early adolescence – a feasibility study and development of research protocol 31 Jan 2016

<p>Childhood thinness (unhealthily low body mass index) has been linked to poorer health and development but has received relatively little research attention in high income countries. Contemporary routine data reported by the National Child Measurement Programme (NCMP) point towards a possible U-shaped socio-economic gradient in thinness in 10-11 year olds (whereby those living in the most <em>and</em> least deprived areas have elevated rates of thinness). However, since the main focus of the NCMP is overweight and obesity, this social patterning in thinness has not been emphasised or further investigated. The U-shaped socio-economic distribution in thinness may be explained by food poverty in more disadvantaged areas, and issues of body image and eating disorders in more advantaged groups. UK cohort studies provide an untapped resource for examining this issue, because they contain rich, individual-level data, spanning different time periods (exposed to different social and economic contexts). However cross-cohort comparisons can be challenging and require a lot of input at the planning stage. This proposal therefore comprises of a feasibility study for a cross-cohort investigation of individual-level socio-economic inequalities in thinness in young people (and possible reasons behind them).</p>

Amount: £2,100
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Created Out of Mind Hub award application support costs 31 Dec 2015

<p>This application follows an invitation from Wellcome staff to apply for a small grant to support costs relating to the development of our shortlisted outline application for the Hub award&nbsp;<em>Created Out of Mind: Changing perceptions of dementia through art and culture</em>. The proposed costs will be used to cover project management of our bid, art design and branding input from creative members of our hub bid team, and travel expenses relating to a series of meetings and workshops designed to build&nbsp;relationships, develop conversations and discuss key questions and proposed projects within and between existing and new team members.&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £4,766
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London