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Recipients:
University College London
Amounts:
£500 - £1,000
£1,000 - £5,000

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Trying and Trying and Trying extension. 21 Feb 2011

Gethan Dick will work with six UCL scientists to write six song poems, each one based on the experience and research of a single scientist. She will then work with six bands, each with their own fans and community of interest, to record the pieces. The songs will be made available for free on CD at a number of venues around London and wider afield, as well as via popular download sites. The final CD will feature text and images from each scientist as a response to the song poem about their work.

Amount: £2,725
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

"Biography and the history of psychology and psychiatry" to be held at UCL in June 2011. 28 Mar 2011

To establish an international network of scholars currently using biographical approaches to study the History of Psychology and Psychiatry. To encourage debate and a reflexive awareness about the methodological advantages and problems associated with biographical approaches in general and those that are particularly pertinent to this field of historical research. To examine the historical use of 'patient biographies', in the form of individual case studies, by psychologists and psychiatrists and to problematise such epistemological practices, as a basis of knowledge formation, within these disciplines. To raise awareness of, and discuss solutions to, the 'public engagement gap' between the kind of biographies that are extremely popular with the lay public and those that are deemed 'too scholarly' and unprofitable by publishers. To disseminate the findings and discussions of the symposium to a wider audience after the event. Providing the papers presented form a sufficiently coherent body of original material, publication will be sought in the form of a special issue of a relevant journal, for example, Journal of the History of the Behavioural Sciences, History of the Human Sciences, History of Psychiatry.

Amount: £4,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Revisiting Jebel Moya: Social and biological evolution in south-central Sudan 06 Jun 2011

Description of the project and its relevance Jebel Moya is a combined cemetery and settlement locality in the south-central Sudan which was excavated in the early 20th century by the founder of the Wellcome Trust, Sir Henry Wellcome. The excavation was overseen by different field directors, employing variable excavation, recording and surveying techniques, over the course of the four seasons from January 1911 - April 1914. Plans for further expeditions were first placed on hold by the outbreak of World War I and subsequently ended by Sir Henry's death in 1936. Around a fifth of the estimated 10.4 hectares of deposits were excavated. It still stands as one of the largest British excavations ever undertaken in Africa and one of the largest cemeteries yet excavated in North-East Africa. Overall, 2792 graves were excavated and recorded. A site report was eventually published by Frank Addison in 1949, followed by Ramkrishna Mukherjee, C. Rao and J. Trevor's 1955 analysis of the osteological remains. Limited re-analyses have since been conducted. Rudolf Gerharz (1994), Isabella Caneva (1991) and Joel Irish (2007). Gerharz only utilised the information contained in Addison's 1949 report, particularly the limited Registrar of Graves, to propose a new tentative chronology; he never re-examined any of the excavation records and materials firsthand. Caneva examined a small sample of pottery, curated at the British Museum, from the earliest settlement period. Irish looked at the remaining teeth to test Mukherjee's hypothesis on population heterogeneity. No previous study has re-examined the excavation records and materials to test the validity of the original site reports, and to re-analyse the social implications of the individual burial assemblages and distribution of graves. Furthermore, there has been no attempt to ascertain the probability of conducting radiometric dating on either the osteological or pottery remains, for example using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (organic materials) and Thermoluminescence (inorganic materials, including pottery). My accompanying paper from Sudan & Nubia (2009) provides a critical overview of the previous publications mentioned above, details my investigations to date, demonstrates that there remains much information to glean from studies of the materials - both skeletal and associated artefacts - and presents preliminary ideas resulting from analysing the grave card data which I am cataloguing into the first ever electronic database for the site. In addition, I am re-examining the excavated grave, settlement and skeletal materials firsthand. The majority of the grave objects? positions are recorded on the grave and anatomical cards, and also in Addison's register of graves. These factors are also being entered into the database under together with data on the strata, attitude of the burials and the condition of the skeletal remains. Furthermore, Dr Kevin MacDonald (Institute of Archaeology, UCL) will be assisting me in the Petrie and British Museums to analyse the associated settlement and grave pottery which is of chronological, spatial and social interest; this has never been comprehensively undertaken before. Moreover, as a result of research presented at the May 2009 Sudanese Archaeological Research Society's conference (British Museum), Professor Abdel Rahman Ali extended an open invitation to visit the National Museum of Sudan (Khartoum) and work on the housed Jebel Moya materials which remain unstudied. The accompanying Table 1, derived from Frank Addison's registrar of graves in his 1949 publication, summarises the distribution of the artefacts from Wellcome's expedition which are primarily held in museums in Cambridge, Khartoum and London.I will also be using the information provided in the archived records on the skeletal and associated grave artefacts to reconstruct behavioural patterns, social structures and population histories. The previous Jebel Moya publications did not adequately integrate different subsets of data, resulting in an incomplete reconstruction of the social and biological transformations which occurred over the millennia. Theoretical modelling of social and biological evolution has advanced considerably in the 60 years since Addison's publication. Mortuary systems can provide information on social variability through analysing spatial dimensions, in comparison with biological and cultural affiliations: human (biological) bodies are loci of identity at individual and group levels, and are situated within the wider culturally constructed landscape. Places were defined and made significant not just by their physical location but also by materiality, including the skeletal remains. There are two additional avenues which my research encompasses: bone chemistry and DNA analyses. The human skeletal and faunal remains are curated in the Duckworth Laboratory, Cambridge, and some are in a condition where bone chemical analyses could be attempted. Such analyses, if successful, would help shed light on marriage patterns and possible migratory patterns by disentangling intra-site and regional relationships, and also provide information on diet. DNA would help test previous hypotheses of genetic closeness in, for example, the proposed elite cemetery from the late first millennium BC. Dr Tamsin O'Connell (Wellcome Trust Research Fellow, MacDonald Institute) and Professor Martin Jones (Department of Archaeology) will be approached for their assistance. A third avenue, that of disease, could be looked at as a possible future research question. Therefore, the interdisciplinary approach which I employ involves interpreting the relationships between mortuary behaviour, memory and material culture by utilising aspects of bioarchaeology (such as radiocarbon dating and isotopic studies), ethnography, Wellcome's expedition records and the archaeological artefacts housed in different museums. The re-examination of the nature of burial distributions will assist in establishing relative chronologies of graves, cultural histories, patterns of pastoral migrations and interactions with the surrounding regions. There is also the possibility of conducting radiometric dating on appropriate skeletal remains in order to arrive at a firmer chronology than what is currently available. These avenues for research are also detailed in the sub-section 'What can be done with the data' in my accompanying paper.

Amount: £1,100
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship. 20 May 2011

Not available

Amount: £1,520
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Body Matters 13 Apr 2010

Body Matters' is an exhibition exploring how cutting edge research in science, medicine and archaeology taking place at UCL can change and challenge our perceptions of health-related issues. The exhibition will take an audience-based approach to communicate complex research in an attractive and accessible way to an adult audience with no specialist knowledge of some or all of these fields The exhibition is designed and curated by postgraduate Museum Studies students from UCL, and is part of a project which also includes an event to be held at the Science Museum's Dana Centre. The exhibition will be held in the Leventis Gallery of UCL's Institute of Archaeology and will run from May 2010 to April 2011. Audience research has shown that the audience will be largely adult and academic, but with no specialist knowledge of science, medicine or archaeology. The exhibition is open to UCL staff, students and visitors, and also to the public. We are seeking funding to assist us in creating an exhibition that is as attention-grabbing and inspiring as the research it is presenting, and to partially fund the private view, which will include the Director of the Science Museum and UCL's Vice Provost of Research as speakers.

Amount: £1,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Molecular and developmental alterations in circadian clock function in various strains of the Mexican blind cavefish, Astyanax mexicanus. 29 Mar 2010

A major environmental cue for most organisms is the daily cycle of light and darkness Consequently, most organisms have developed a system, synchronised by the light/dark cycle coordinating physiology and behaviour with the environment. This system is known as the circadian clock and was proposed to be a neural phenomenon residing in a region of the central nervous system: the SCN. Over the last decade, research has led to a decentralisation of the circadian clock with discoveries of independent peripheral oscillators both in vivo (Whitmore et al, 1998) and in vitro cell culture (Whitmore et al, 2000; Welsh et al, 2004). Additionally, zebrafish cells can detect light and use this to set the phase of the circadian clock. Recent research in our lab has begun to investigate the workings of the circadian clock in a species of fish that lives in perpetual darkness, and is therefore missing the major environmental cue for most living organisms. This work has been performed using the Mexican tetra, Astyanax mexicanus; a single teleost species consisting of a sighted surface-dwelling form and several independent cave dwelling forms. Cavefish have lost eyes and pigmentation, as well as gaining constructive feature: such as increased jaw size and taste bud number. Selective pressures for retaining light adaptive features such as pigmentation are relaxed in the absence of light, and it is believed that pigmentation is lost through neutral mutations in the Oca2 gene (Protas et al, 2006). Little research has been performed on circadian clocks in cave animals, and particularly not on cave animals with living con-specific surface dwelling ancestors. This is important because when the ancestral surface form is still present, a direct comparison can be made between ancestral and derived developmental states. Astyanax is thus an important model for understanding the molecular basis of developmental changes in the context microevolution. Jeffery suggested "cavefish can be compared with surface fish in essentially the same way as mutants are compared with wild-type phenotypes" (Jeffery, 2008). We possess a model in which we can investigate a range of clock phenotypes. We will use surface fish and the two different populations of cavefish (Pachon and Steinhard) in our proposed research to further understand clock mechanisms in a dark adapted animal and assess whether cavefish really are clock mutants. If they are mutants in the clock me

Amount: £4,680
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

History of Medicine MA dissertations. To be held at the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine on 16 May 2009 21 Apr 2009

The intention of the meeting is to foster collaboration in History of Medicine MA programmes in the UK and Ireland through establishing joint training days. The meeting will enable students from such programmes to make short presentations of their MA dissertations, and to interact with and get feedback from their peers from other programmes, as well from tutors from other departments. The aim of the meeting is to establish a centralised platform for the training of History of Medicine MA students suitable for generic research skills. The most critical research component of the current programmes is the dissertation, which for a number of students, forms a point of departure for a subsequent History of Medicine Phd. The aim of the meeting is to better prepare students for their MA dissertations and for continuing research in the history of medicine.

Amount: £2,300
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

A cultural history of mental health and the role of Franco Basaglia in Italy, 1960-2008. Pilot research and recce. 21 Apr 2009

The aim of this pilot research is to establish the presence and overall of archival and other material relating to mental health reform and the activities of Franco Basaglia in Italy in various Italian locations with a view to an extensive research project application to the Wellcome Trust in December 2009. 1. Overall project Using the research grant funds, a number of cities where large-scale mental health institutions were located, and were at the centre of reform efforts by doctors and activists influence by Franco Basaglia and others in the 1960s and 1970s will be visited. The aim will be to make contact with those who took part in the period of reform and change, and to make a survey of the presence of archival and other material (photographs, newspapers, official material, the structural state and contemporary use of the buildings, film material) with a view to a large-scale research project (application to be prepared for December 2009). These recces will make an overall assessment of the material available, its accessibility and lead to an assessment of the time and resources needed to collect and analyse the relevant material.

Amount: £3,950
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

The World Health Organization and the social determinants of health: assessing theory, policy and practice (an international conference). 29 Aug 2008

The World Health Oraganisation and the Social Determinants of Health: Assessing theory, policy and practice (An international conference).

Amount: £850
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Global Health Histories/WHO anniversary Lectures, organized in association with the Wellcome Trust and the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL, UK to be held at the WHO in Geneva March to December 2008. 16 Jan 2008

Title of the meeting: 'Global Health Histories/WHO anniversary Lectures, organized in association with the Wellcome Trust and the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL, UK', WHO headquarters, Geneva. This will be the first lecture series of its kind within the headquarters of the World Health Organization in Geneva, Switzerland. The aim is to engage those involved in formulating and implementing health policies with historians of medicine working on policy-related issues, in the expectation that these interactions will be useful to all concerned. The usefulness of historical findings is being increasingly acknowledged within the WHO, as its employees have become more enthusiastic about carrying out more detailed political and social negotiations in the countries and regions where public health and medical schemes are being put into place. The work of the invited speakers is, therefore, likely to be instructive to WHO workers of different ranks and departments, including those seconded to the different Regional Offices on advisory capacities.

Amount: £4,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

'The importance of medical history: Transnational and cross-cultural perspectives on a multi-faceted discipline' conference to be held in Mumbai, India from 15th to 17th November 2007. 17 Oct 2007

The importance of medical history: Trans-national and cross-cultural perspectives on a multi-faceted discipline The proposed meeting will be the first of its type in the South Asian sub-continent - dealing with the important questions of historical method and historiography, from trans-national and cross-disciplinary perspectives; it will allow the audience access to a plethora of perspectives on how to study HOM. The projected audience will be university and college teaching, research and administrative staff of all grades, we well as undergraduate and post-graduate students, doctors, print and TV journalists, and independent researchers. A number of well-known scholars have agreed to attend the meeting, as they acknowledge the usefulness of an event like this in popularising HOM in an important education centre in Asia. These academics, who are attached to a number of Wellcome Trust-funded units, will draw upon an important item of their research - dealing with Europe, North America, Asia and further afield - to develop trans-national perspectives of how to study HOM. This meeting will engender a lot of discussion, which is critically important for an endeavour that seeks to provide new insights to post-and under-graduate teachers about important international developments in the discipline, and the most effective ways of teaching and carrying out research. Themes to be covered: History of pharmacology; Anatomy; Global trade and medicine; Medical genetics and gender; Medicine in the early modern period; Public health in 19th and 20th centuries; Global health programmes and disease eradication; War and medicine; International perspectives on rabies; Scottish doctors and British empire; Obstetrics and surgery; Cross-disciplinary perspectives on leprosy and empire; Hospitals; Medicine and 'witchcraft' in the early modern period; Healthcare in colonial Mumbai/India; Health of industrial labour; Oral histories of contemporary medicine and biological science; History of medical practice and multiple meanings of health.

Amount: £600
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Student Elective Prize for Ms Leonora Weil 29 Aug 2008

The Epidemiology and Public Health of Mlaria in Vanuatu

Amount: £1,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Student Elective Prize for Ms Katy Walsh 29 Aug 2008

Sexually Transmitted Infections Among Antenatal Women in Vanuatu.

Amount: £1,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Student Elective Prize for Ms Nisa Khan 29 Aug 2008

Clinical Audit of Active Respiratory TB Patients: Who is treated? When and they treated? What is the outcome?

Amount: £1,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Student Elective Prize for Ms Maria-Charlotte Campbell 29 Aug 2008

Management and rehabilitation of patients with socially incompatible personality disorders at Broadmoor Hospital. Secondly an audit into the outcomes of people bought into the emergency department by police who are under the influence of methamphetamine and have suicidal ideation, at St Vincents Hospital in Sydney.

Amount: £1,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Student Elective Prize for Ms Victoria Nowak 29 Aug 2008

The role of metallothionein (MT) in regeneration in the rat olfactory nerve.

Amount: £1,600
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Student Elective Prize for Ms Anushka Patel 29 Aug 2008

The impact of Depression on Hbalc in the Elderly Aboriginal and Non-Indigenous Diabetic Population of Western Australia

Amount: £1,500
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Student Elective Prize for Ms Vivienne N Hannon 29 Aug 2008

A comparison of the management of a chosen disease between the Hospital of Tropical Diseases in Ho Chi Minh City, a centre of excellence for tropical medicine, and the Hospital of Tropical Disease, London including a literature review to identify unresolved management issues of the chosen tropical disease followed by a design of a theoretical clinical trial to be undertaken to clarify these unresolved issues of management.

Amount: £1,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Student Elective Prize for Ms Nirupa Desai 29 Aug 2008

Counting and staging of Plasmodium falciparum in blood films from severe malaria

Amount: £1,600
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London