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Recipients:
University College London
Currency:
GBP
Amounts:
£500 - £1,000
£1,000 - £5,000

Results

Cow Killers and Informal Empire: U.S. Perspectives on Foot-and-Mouth Disease Eradication in Mexico, 1947-1955. 24 Jun 2013

The grant will fund a trip to consult official records of the Mexico-U.S. Commission for the Eradication of Foot-and-Mouth Disease, 1946-1955. These are held in 70 file boxes in the National Archive and Records Administration, Maryland. It will also pay for copying a small number of related documents in the Truman Memorial Library. This research will result in the completion of an article in January 2014 analyzing how U.S. politics and culture shaped the campaign, focusing on cattle-ranching int erests and U.S. attitudes to science, state power, rural Mexico, and the Cold War. This research will also allow me to gather materials for a larger monograph-length project that I am currently developing.

Amount: £3,990
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Identifying mechanisms of mechanosensation in the Drosophila notum that contribute to the control of epithelial junction remodelling. 27 Jan 2012

When two epithelial cells make contact they form a stable cell adhesion complex that finally results in the formation of an epithelium. However when two mesenchymal cells make contact the outcome is completely different: they do not form a permanent adhesion complex and very frequently they move away from each other in a behavior called contact inhibition of locomotion [1]. Intriguingly, cell adhesion molecules such as cadherins are known to be involved in both kinds of cell interaction. The formation and dynamics of the adhesion complex in epithelial cells has been extensively studied [2], but the study of cell-cell interactions and cell adhesion in mesenchymal cells has been rather neglected. The aim of this project is to compare cell adhesion complex formation between epithelial cells and between mesenchymal cells, in order to understand the different outcomes of these two cell interactions. This knowledge would help us to better understand important processes such as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and contact inhibition of locomotion; two cell behaviors that are central to both cancer metastasis and cell migration during embryo development. We will use two embryonic cell populations whose behavior has been very well characterized in our lab: neural crest (as a mesenchymal cell type) and placode cells (as an epithelial cell type). Most of the experiments will be performed using Xenopus cells cultured in vitro, but we will also analyze cell behavior in vivo, using zebrafish and Xenopus embryos. The cell adhesion complex has been well characterized in epithelial cells, and several key molecules have been described, such as cadherins, catenins, and elements of the cytoskeleton like actin and myosin. In addition, the regulation of small GTPases, such as RhoA and Rac, has been shown to be essential for the formation and maintenance of epithelial junctions. In this project, we will study in placode (epithelial) and neural crest (mesenchymal) cells: i) the dynamic localization of molecules of the cell adhesion complex during cell contact ii) the dynamics of small GTPases during cell contact and their regulation by elements of the adhesion complex. iii) From the above experiments we expect to find the key elements that regulate the different outcome of epithelial and mesenchymal cell-cell contacts. Based on these results, we will perform functional studies with these molecules in order to change a mesenchymal cell-cell contact into an epithelial interaction and vice versa.

Amount: £3,500
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship. 20 May 2011

Not available

Amount: £1,520
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Body Matters 13 Apr 2010

Body Matters' is an exhibition exploring how cutting edge research in science, medicine and archaeology taking place at UCL can change and challenge our perceptions of health-related issues. The exhibition will take an audience-based approach to communicate complex research in an attractive and accessible way to an adult audience with no specialist knowledge of some or all of these fields The exhibition is designed and curated by postgraduate Museum Studies students from UCL, and is part of a project which also includes an event to be held at the Science Museum's Dana Centre. The exhibition will be held in the Leventis Gallery of UCL's Institute of Archaeology and will run from May 2010 to April 2011. Audience research has shown that the audience will be largely adult and academic, but with no specialist knowledge of science, medicine or archaeology. The exhibition is open to UCL staff, students and visitors, and also to the public. We are seeking funding to assist us in creating an exhibition that is as attention-grabbing and inspiring as the research it is presenting, and to partially fund the private view, which will include the Director of the Science Museum and UCL's Vice Provost of Research as speakers.

Amount: £1,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Student Elective Prize for Ms Nisa Khan 29 Aug 2008

Clinical Audit of Active Respiratory TB Patients: Who is treated? When and they treated? What is the outcome?

Amount: £1,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Student Elective Prize for Ms Maria-Charlotte Campbell 29 Aug 2008

Management and rehabilitation of patients with socially incompatible personality disorders at Broadmoor Hospital. Secondly an audit into the outcomes of people bought into the emergency department by police who are under the influence of methamphetamine and have suicidal ideation, at St Vincents Hospital in Sydney.

Amount: £1,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Student Elective Prize for Ms Victoria Nowak 29 Aug 2008

The role of metallothionein (MT) in regeneration in the rat olfactory nerve.

Amount: £1,600
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Student Elective Prize for Ms Anushka Patel 29 Aug 2008

The impact of Depression on Hbalc in the Elderly Aboriginal and Non-Indigenous Diabetic Population of Western Australia

Amount: £1,500
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Student Elective Prize for Ms Vivienne N Hannon 29 Aug 2008

A comparison of the management of a chosen disease between the Hospital of Tropical Diseases in Ho Chi Minh City, a centre of excellence for tropical medicine, and the Hospital of Tropical Disease, London including a literature review to identify unresolved management issues of the chosen tropical disease followed by a design of a theoretical clinical trial to be undertaken to clarify these unresolved issues of management.

Amount: £1,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Student Elective Prize for Ms Nirupa Desai 29 Aug 2008

Counting and staging of Plasmodium falciparum in blood films from severe malaria

Amount: £1,600
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Student Elective Prize for Ms Meha J Bhayani 29 Aug 2008

A clinical research project to investigate the cardiac reviews and outcomes of patients with hereditary neuromuscular disease.

Amount: £1,300
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

No time for panic: British responses to influenza in peace and war, 1889-1919 29 Aug 2008

The 1918 influenza pandemic represents the worst outbreak of infectious disease in Britain in modern times. Although the virus swept the world in three waves between March 1918 and April 1919, in Britain the majority of the estimated 228,000 fatalities occurred in the autumn of 1918. In London alone deaths at the peak of the epidemic were 55.5 per 1,000- the highest since the 1849 cholera epidemic. Yet in the capital as in other great cities and towns throughout Britain, there was none of the panic that had accompanied earlier 19th century outbreaks of infectious disease at the heart of urban populations. Instead, the British response to the 'Spanish Lady' as the pandemic strain of flu was familiarly known was remarkably sanguine. As The Times commented at the height of the pandemic: 'Never since the Black Death has such a plague swept over the face of the world, [and] never, perhaps, has a plague been more stoically accepted.' The apparent absence of marked social responses to the 1918 influenza is a phenomenon much remarked on in the literature of the pandemic, as is the apparent paradox that despite the widespread morbidity and high mortality the pandemic had little apparent impact on public institutions and left few traces in public memory. However, to date no one has explored the deeper cultural 'narratives' that informed and conditioned these responses. Was Britain really a more stoical and robust nation in 1918, or was the absence of medical and other social responses a reflection of the particular social and political conditions that prevailed in Britain during the First World War and then medical nosologies and cultural perceptions of influenza? And if the 1918 pandemic was 'overshadowed,' as one writer puts it, by the war and the peace that followed the Armistice, what explains the similarly muted response to the Russian flu pandemic of the early 1890's, a disease outbreak that coincided with a long period of peace and stability in Britain? In this project I aim to show that, contrary to previous studies, both the 1918 and the 1889-92 Russian flu pandemic were the objects of much deeper public concern and anxiety than has previously been acknowledged and that the morbidity of prominent members of British society, coupled with the high mortality, occasioned widespread 'dread' and in some cases alarm. However, in 1918 at least, government departments and public institutions actively suppressed these concerns for the sake of the war effort and the maintenance of national morale.

Amount: £657
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Global Health Histories/WHO anniversary Lectures, organized in association with the Wellcome Trust and the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL, UK to be held at the WHO in Geneva March to December 2008. 16 Jan 2008

Title of the meeting: 'Global Health Histories/WHO anniversary Lectures, organized in association with the Wellcome Trust and the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL, UK', WHO headquarters, Geneva. This will be the first lecture series of its kind within the headquarters of the World Health Organization in Geneva, Switzerland. The aim is to engage those involved in formulating and implementing health policies with historians of medicine working on policy-related issues, in the expectation that these interactions will be useful to all concerned. The usefulness of historical findings is being increasingly acknowledged within the WHO, as its employees have become more enthusiastic about carrying out more detailed political and social negotiations in the countries and regions where public health and medical schemes are being put into place. The work of the invited speakers is, therefore, likely to be instructive to WHO workers of different ranks and departments, including those seconded to the different Regional Offices on advisory capacities.

Amount: £4,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Investigating the neural odometer function of entorhinal grid cells in rats navigating a multi-planar environment. 01 Apr 2016

<p>It has been proposed that the grid cell system in the medial entorhinal cortex acts as a &lsquo;neural odometer&rsquo;, encoding both distance travelled and an animal's position in space. These features may be necessary for spatial computations such as path integration, but the relationship of grid cell firing patterns to behaviour remains speculative. In not-yet-published work, it has been shown that for a rat climbing a wall with its body plane aligned vertically the grid fields are expanded, as if the cells underestimate distance travelled. If grid cells support spatial computations then rats should also underestimate distances in this plane. To test this hypothesis rats will learn a distance match-to-sample task leading to triangle completion while both sample and choice phases are in the same plane (both horizontal or both vertical). In probe trials, the sample will be horizontal but the choice vertical. Distance underestimation in the probe trials (walking too far on the vertical wall to achieve a match to the horizontal sample) will link grid cells to behaviour, while the basic distance-matching task will serve as a springboard for neurobiological studies investigating the role of grid cells in odometry generally.</p>

Amount: £2,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Harnessing Diversity Generating Retroelements (DGRs) for in vivo evolution 01 Apr 2016

<p>The goal of the project is to express the reverse transcriptase (RT), central to the Bordertella phage BPP-1 diversity generating retroelement (DGR), and test it for synthetic nucleic acid (XNA) synthesis as well as reverse transcription. In addition, I will focus on cloning the BPP-1 DGR elements into E. coli, creating a circuit where DGR function can activate a selectable marker (e.g. kanR). I will try and demonstrate that the BPP-1 DGR is active in E. coli and can be used as a tool for in vivo directed evolution.</p>

Amount: £2,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

The Involvement of Ventral Hippocampal Circuitry in Social Interaction 01 Apr 2016

<p>The research project represents an initial investigation into the role of the diverse components of the ventral hippocampal circuitry in the context of social interaction.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The aim is to explore a potential correlation between complex behavioural patterns observed during social interaction tasks and degree of activation of ventral hippocampal neurons.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Behavioural assessment will only be carried out on single housed male mice to avoid sex-specific differences. During my experiments I will compare two contexts. First, as a control, mice will be placed in a test chamber with a novel object. Second, social interaction will be tested by introducing a juvenile male. The behavioural patterns generated will be scored and compared both qualitatively and quantitatively.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>After 90 minutes, the degree of activation&nbsp;of distinct ventral hippocampal areas (CA1, CA2, CA3, Dentate Gyrus and Subiculum) will be tested in each of these groups of mice using expression of the immediate-early gene <em>c-fos</em>&nbsp;(which is correlated to neuronal activation), by optimising immunohistochemical detection in the lab.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>I will then aim to establish the involvement of the ventral hippocampus in social interaction by&nbsp;using&nbsp;fluorescent microscopy analysis, followed by appropriate statistical testing between the control and social groups.&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £2,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Structural Basis of Gabapentinoid Drug Action 01 Apr 2016

<p>Gabapentinoids are blockbuster drugs used to treat conditions including neuropathic pain and epilepsy. They act by binding &alpha;2&delta; voltage-gated Ca<sup>2+</sup> channel subunits. The focus of this&nbsp;summer project is to investigate the structure of &alpha;2&delta; to help understand its role in presynaptic Ca<sup>2+</sup> entry and reveal the molecular basis of gabapentinoid binding.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>We have developed constructs for &alpha;2&delta; expression in High5 insect cells and HEK293T eukaryotic cells. We will express and purify different regions of &alpha;2&delta;, taking advantage of enzymes at our disposal for modifying glycosylation and pre-protein cleavage. Co-crystallisation screens will be set up with natural and synthetic small molecules including pregabalin and gabapentin. Successful crystal hits will be tested for x-ray diffraction using an in-house x-ray source. In the final fortnight of reserach, the student will perform crosslinking coupled to mass spectrometry experiments to determine the interaction sites of different subunits within the calcium channel complex, depending on the progress of crystallisation experiments.</p>

Amount: £2,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Combined liposomal delivery of small molecule and oligonucleotide therapeutics 01 Apr 2016

<p>Liposomal delivery of therapeutic agents, and/or imaging agents, is an important and rapidly emerging area which will have considerable impact on many disease areas including respiratory diseases, vaccine delivery and cancer. These liposome-based formulations are increasingly important for delivery and imaging of small molecule therapeutics, and for the delivery of plasmid DNA encoding for imaging agents or toxic genes, as they offer the benefits of cell-selective delivery with minimal off-target effects. However, to date it has not been possible to formulate both small molecule therapeutics and plasmid DNA in the same nanoparticle delivery system. The aim of this research is to develop multifunctional nanoparticles for liposomal delivery of both a small molecule therapeutic and plasmid DNA. This will have the advantage of delivering two different therapies to the same diseased cell, ensuring more rapid therapeutic effect and minimising the development of resistance to each individual therapeutic intervention.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £2,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London