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Recipients:
University College London
Currency:
GBP
Amounts:
£500 - £1,000
£1,000 - £5,000

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History of Medicine MA dissertations. To be held at the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine on 16 May 2009 21 Apr 2009

The intention of the meeting is to foster collaboration in History of Medicine MA programmes in the UK and Ireland through establishing joint training days. The meeting will enable students from such programmes to make short presentations of their MA dissertations, and to interact with and get feedback from their peers from other programmes, as well from tutors from other departments. The aim of the meeting is to establish a centralised platform for the training of History of Medicine MA students suitable for generic research skills. The most critical research component of the current programmes is the dissertation, which for a number of students, forms a point of departure for a subsequent History of Medicine Phd. The aim of the meeting is to better prepare students for their MA dissertations and for continuing research in the history of medicine.

Amount: £2,300
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

A cultural history of mental health and the role of Franco Basaglia in Italy, 1960-2008. Pilot research and recce. 21 Apr 2009

The aim of this pilot research is to establish the presence and overall of archival and other material relating to mental health reform and the activities of Franco Basaglia in Italy in various Italian locations with a view to an extensive research project application to the Wellcome Trust in December 2009. 1. Overall project Using the research grant funds, a number of cities where large-scale mental health institutions were located, and were at the centre of reform efforts by doctors and activists influence by Franco Basaglia and others in the 1960s and 1970s will be visited. The aim will be to make contact with those who took part in the period of reform and change, and to make a survey of the presence of archival and other material (photographs, newspapers, official material, the structural state and contemporary use of the buildings, film material) with a view to a large-scale research project (application to be prepared for December 2009). These recces will make an overall assessment of the material available, its accessibility and lead to an assessment of the time and resources needed to collect and analyse the relevant material.

Amount: £3,950
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

The World Health Organization and the social determinants of health: assessing theory, policy and practice (an international conference). 29 Aug 2008

The World Health Oraganisation and the Social Determinants of Health: Assessing theory, policy and practice (An international conference).

Amount: £850
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Global Health Histories/WHO anniversary Lectures, organized in association with the Wellcome Trust and the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL, UK to be held at the WHO in Geneva March to December 2008. 16 Jan 2008

Title of the meeting: 'Global Health Histories/WHO anniversary Lectures, organized in association with the Wellcome Trust and the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL, UK', WHO headquarters, Geneva. This will be the first lecture series of its kind within the headquarters of the World Health Organization in Geneva, Switzerland. The aim is to engage those involved in formulating and implementing health policies with historians of medicine working on policy-related issues, in the expectation that these interactions will be useful to all concerned. The usefulness of historical findings is being increasingly acknowledged within the WHO, as its employees have become more enthusiastic about carrying out more detailed political and social negotiations in the countries and regions where public health and medical schemes are being put into place. The work of the invited speakers is, therefore, likely to be instructive to WHO workers of different ranks and departments, including those seconded to the different Regional Offices on advisory capacities.

Amount: £4,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

'The importance of medical history: Transnational and cross-cultural perspectives on a multi-faceted discipline' conference to be held in Mumbai, India from 15th to 17th November 2007. 17 Oct 2007

The importance of medical history: Trans-national and cross-cultural perspectives on a multi-faceted discipline The proposed meeting will be the first of its type in the South Asian sub-continent - dealing with the important questions of historical method and historiography, from trans-national and cross-disciplinary perspectives; it will allow the audience access to a plethora of perspectives on how to study HOM. The projected audience will be university and college teaching, research and administrative staff of all grades, we well as undergraduate and post-graduate students, doctors, print and TV journalists, and independent researchers. A number of well-known scholars have agreed to attend the meeting, as they acknowledge the usefulness of an event like this in popularising HOM in an important education centre in Asia. These academics, who are attached to a number of Wellcome Trust-funded units, will draw upon an important item of their research - dealing with Europe, North America, Asia and further afield - to develop trans-national perspectives of how to study HOM. This meeting will engender a lot of discussion, which is critically important for an endeavour that seeks to provide new insights to post-and under-graduate teachers about important international developments in the discipline, and the most effective ways of teaching and carrying out research. Themes to be covered: History of pharmacology; Anatomy; Global trade and medicine; Medical genetics and gender; Medicine in the early modern period; Public health in 19th and 20th centuries; Global health programmes and disease eradication; War and medicine; International perspectives on rabies; Scottish doctors and British empire; Obstetrics and surgery; Cross-disciplinary perspectives on leprosy and empire; Hospitals; Medicine and 'witchcraft' in the early modern period; Healthcare in colonial Mumbai/India; Health of industrial labour; Oral histories of contemporary medicine and biological science; History of medical practice and multiple meanings of health.

Amount: £600
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Student Elective Prize for Ms Leonora Weil 29 Aug 2008

The Epidemiology and Public Health of Mlaria in Vanuatu

Amount: £1,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Student Elective Prize for Ms Katy Walsh 29 Aug 2008

Sexually Transmitted Infections Among Antenatal Women in Vanuatu.

Amount: £1,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Student Elective Prize for Ms Nisa Khan 29 Aug 2008

Clinical Audit of Active Respiratory TB Patients: Who is treated? When and they treated? What is the outcome?

Amount: £1,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Student Elective Prize for Ms Maria-Charlotte Campbell 29 Aug 2008

Management and rehabilitation of patients with socially incompatible personality disorders at Broadmoor Hospital. Secondly an audit into the outcomes of people bought into the emergency department by police who are under the influence of methamphetamine and have suicidal ideation, at St Vincents Hospital in Sydney.

Amount: £1,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Student Elective Prize for Ms Victoria Nowak 29 Aug 2008

The role of metallothionein (MT) in regeneration in the rat olfactory nerve.

Amount: £1,600
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Student Elective Prize for Ms Anushka Patel 29 Aug 2008

The impact of Depression on Hbalc in the Elderly Aboriginal and Non-Indigenous Diabetic Population of Western Australia

Amount: £1,500
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Student Elective Prize for Ms Vivienne N Hannon 29 Aug 2008

A comparison of the management of a chosen disease between the Hospital of Tropical Diseases in Ho Chi Minh City, a centre of excellence for tropical medicine, and the Hospital of Tropical Disease, London including a literature review to identify unresolved management issues of the chosen tropical disease followed by a design of a theoretical clinical trial to be undertaken to clarify these unresolved issues of management.

Amount: £1,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Student Elective Prize for Ms Nirupa Desai 29 Aug 2008

Counting and staging of Plasmodium falciparum in blood films from severe malaria

Amount: £1,600
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Student Elective Prize for Ms Meha J Bhayani 29 Aug 2008

A clinical research project to investigate the cardiac reviews and outcomes of patients with hereditary neuromuscular disease.

Amount: £1,300
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

No time for panic: British responses to influenza in peace and war, 1889-1919 29 Aug 2008

The 1918 influenza pandemic represents the worst outbreak of infectious disease in Britain in modern times. Although the virus swept the world in three waves between March 1918 and April 1919, in Britain the majority of the estimated 228,000 fatalities occurred in the autumn of 1918. In London alone deaths at the peak of the epidemic were 55.5 per 1,000- the highest since the 1849 cholera epidemic. Yet in the capital as in other great cities and towns throughout Britain, there was none of the panic that had accompanied earlier 19th century outbreaks of infectious disease at the heart of urban populations. Instead, the British response to the 'Spanish Lady' as the pandemic strain of flu was familiarly known was remarkably sanguine. As The Times commented at the height of the pandemic: 'Never since the Black Death has such a plague swept over the face of the world, [and] never, perhaps, has a plague been more stoically accepted.' The apparent absence of marked social responses to the 1918 influenza is a phenomenon much remarked on in the literature of the pandemic, as is the apparent paradox that despite the widespread morbidity and high mortality the pandemic had little apparent impact on public institutions and left few traces in public memory. However, to date no one has explored the deeper cultural 'narratives' that informed and conditioned these responses. Was Britain really a more stoical and robust nation in 1918, or was the absence of medical and other social responses a reflection of the particular social and political conditions that prevailed in Britain during the First World War and then medical nosologies and cultural perceptions of influenza? And if the 1918 pandemic was 'overshadowed,' as one writer puts it, by the war and the peace that followed the Armistice, what explains the similarly muted response to the Russian flu pandemic of the early 1890's, a disease outbreak that coincided with a long period of peace and stability in Britain? In this project I aim to show that, contrary to previous studies, both the 1918 and the 1889-92 Russian flu pandemic were the objects of much deeper public concern and anxiety than has previously been acknowledged and that the morbidity of prominent members of British society, coupled with the high mortality, occasioned widespread 'dread' and in some cases alarm. However, in 1918 at least, government departments and public institutions actively suppressed these concerns for the sake of the war effort and the maintenance of national morale.

Amount: £657
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

New genetic knowledge and 'lay' expertise in cancer research: exmaining the cultural context of ethics and legitimacy. 31 Aug 2007

The project examines the social parameters of 'lay expertise' in relation to cancer research charities. It seeks to explore how lay consumers', fundraisers' or patients' perspectives and involvement are being incorporated within organisational practices and research agendas of charities that are funding research into cancer genetics. This initiative provides a vantage point from which to explore the pursuit and problems surrounding ethical legitimacy in the cultural context of the new genetics. This issue will be addressed by examining how emerging genetic knowledge and the development of lay expertise affect: The pre-existing balance between lay and expert and the nature of the 'gift' relationship in cancer research charities Attempts to incorporate lay perspectives and sustain 'hope' Social relations among different fundraisers and personhood in the context of lay expertise. The transactional social spaces of cancer research charities offer an important arena for ethnographic inquiry and therefore the opportunity to contribute to an understanding of science as a social process.

Amount: £4,814
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

The roles of glial cells in models of neurodegenerative disease. 14 Dec 2005

My own work, using fluorescent imaging techniques during the rotation project, showed that Ab increases ROS generation by activation of the NADPH oxidase in BV2 cells and that inhibition of the CLIC1-mediated chloride conductance - with IAA-94, by transfecting cells with an siRNA against the CLIC1 protein or by substitution of Cl with non-permeant anions almost completely prevents that response. We propose that the activity of the NADPH oxidase is limited by charge compensation and that the chloride conductance plays a key role in augmenting the activity of the enzyme by providing a route for the compensation of electron flow across the membrane. CLIC1 is also expressed in astrocytes, but at present we have no data regarding its possible functions. The functions of this CLIC1-mediated chloride conductance, its mode of activation, the means by which its inhibition can reduce ROS production and neuronal death and its potential ubiquity and general importance in glial cell physiology will form the basis of the research to be undertaken during the course of this PhD.

Amount: £4,890
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

'Epidemics in South Asian History: A review of medical, political and social responses' conference to be held in Burdwan, India on 7th, 8th and 9th November 2006. 08 Feb 2006

Epidemics in South Asian History: A review of medical, political and social responses A lot of the valuable research that this meeting will showcase is being carried out by staff in the smaller South Asian universities, whose contributions are often ignored in well-known publications; similarly, many UK-based associations for the study of the history of medicine remain unaware of the range and richness of this work, generally to their own disadvantage. This situation generally exists because scholars attached to the smaller South Asian universities have relatively weak links with the major international communities of historians of medicine, particularly those in the UK and Europe, where there has been a great interest in the subject over the past two decades. Apart from seeking to redress this situation, the proposed meeting also aims to highlight the significance of the study of the history of medicine at a university where a notable level of commitment towards the subject already exists. A joint meeting with the Wellcome Trust Centre would help advertise Burdwan University's efforts to propagate the post-graduate study of the history of medicine, science and technology, which would be useful both nationally and internationally. It is hoped that Burdwan University's efforts will receive greater publicity through a major international conference, which is likely to stoke greater government support for these educational ventures (activities in Burdwan University do not go unnoticed by the Government of West Bengal, which funds educational activities through the state). Burdwan University's intellectual resources could be useful to UK-based historians of medicine, as it offers the possibility of creating new collaborations and an effective base for Wellcome Trust-funded scholars seeking to carry out research in the region (research visas need to be sponsored by recognised universities and the university's department of history could be very helpful in this regard). Burdwan's history department is in keeping with the Wellcome Trust Centre agenda of seeking to expand interest in the history of medicine internationally; a goal in sync with the Wellcome Trust's history of medicine division's own goals.

Amount: £3,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Volunteers in biomedical research: social science perspectives. 14 Dec 2005

Volunteers in Biomedical Research: Social Science Perspectives The aim of this meeting is to bring together academics who are specifically interested in exploring what it means to be a volunteer from the volunteers' perspective. While many of the researchers in the field are London-based, there has been little opportunity for all to meet in a single forum. The workshop will develop ideas and collaborative links for future work, build capacity in the UK social science community, and explore how this area of research can engage with current debates in science policy and research governance. Although UK government policy now puts a strong emphasis on public participation in research governance, there remains little discussion on the participatory role of volunteer human subjects. There are questions too about how adequately current codes of medical ethics function in practice and how they can accommodate the idea of more actively participative volunteers. The proposed workshop and its outputs could contribute to moving forward these issues. Topics to be addressed will include: the researcher-subject relationship; volunteers' understandings of research design and the implications for informed consent; volunteer motivation to participate; historical perspectives on volunteers' self-understanding; the significance of discourse around the 'volunteer', 'participant' or 'subject'; the possibilities for volunteers to influence the design and development of research. The meeting fits specifically with the objective of the Wellcome Biomedical Ethics programme to "build and enhance national capacity in the field". Some of the invited participants are working specifically within the programme's focus, looking at volunteering in relation to genetics (especially genetic databases) and neuroscience (especially brain imaging); others are working on the role of volunteers in a diverse range of the biomedical sciences. This meeting is specifically concerned with qualitative studies of volunteers' own experiences and understandings, and to this extent we are not aware of any recent meetings on this emerging field of science.

Amount: £2,880
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London