Cookies disclaimer

I agree Our site saves small pieces of text information (cookies) on your device in order to deliver better content and for statistical purposes. You can disable the usage of cookies by changing the settings of your browser. By browsing our website without changing the browser settings you grant us permission to store that information on your device.

Current Filters

Recipients:
University College London
Amounts:
£500 - £1,000
£10,000 - £50,000
Award Year:
2008

Results

Vacation Scholarships 2008. 27 May 2008

Not available

Amount: £22,800
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Assessing the challenges faced by health systems in providing paediatric Cotrimoxazole prophylaxis in resource limited countries. 15 May 2008

HIV exposed infants are 16 times more likely to die in their second six months of life than unexposed infants, largely due to respiratory infections. Cotrimoxazole prophylaxis significantly reduces both mortality and morbidity. In Zimbabwe it is estimated that only 11% of exposed infants are prescribed cotrimoxazole and the extent to which it is correctly taken is unknown. The aim of the project is to describe the process and obstacles to provision of cotrimoxazole prophylaxis for HIV exposed infants in three sites in Zimbabwe, focusing on issues related to drug supply and adherence. This information will be used to develop an evidence-based intervention for improving its provision. The study will be conducted in three phases in two Zimbabwean health centres, one urban, one rural: 1) guidelines and standard operating procedures for PMTCT, cotrimoxazole prophylaxis and aftercare of HIV infected mothers will be studied; 2) implementation activities at study clinics including identification of HIV infected mothers, procedures for ensuring babies are prescribed cotrimoxazole and adhere to treatment will be assessed as will aftercare for HIV positive mothers; 3) the findings will be disseminated to stakeholders to identify solutions and develop an evidence based intervention relevant for Zimbabwe and the wider region

Amount: £35,697
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Imaging Brains, Changing Minds. 16 Apr 2008

'Imaging Brains, Changing Minds' is a radio drama that uses the fictional experiences of characters in the past, present and future to explore the far-reaching impact of brain imaging technologies on the way we construct, treat and legislate the interior lives of others. The drama will be broadcast to an international audience on Resonance 104.4fm and further disseminated via a podcast on the web. A series of live readings from the drama and panel discussions about the issues it explores will be accompanied by a film of images of the brain, recorded in different eras and with different technologies.

Amount: £29,931
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Ravelling, Unravelling. 28 Mar 2008

A creative interpretation of topological and geometric investigations currently being undertaken in the biomedical fields, specifically those relating to packaging and unravelling of material within the human body and as used in the treatment of disease. I will research the twisting and foldings found in the organisation of the gut, in the treatment of medical conditions e.g. aneurysms by intra-vascular coiling, and in the structure of DNA. I will spend the first month of the project exploring different structures, techniques and procedures both at UCL hospital and within the University. Succeeding months will be spent developing a body of new work in the studio whilst maintaining regular dialogue with my advisors. The research will culminate in a public exhibition of new work and a cross disciplinary symposium where a range of speakers and guests from diverse backgrounds will be able to meet and discuss related issues in a public context. Both events will be hosted by the Lighthill Institute of Mathematical Sciences.

Amount: £30,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Mechanisms of social interaction. 16 Sep 2008

While I am already supported by the Wellcome Trust, my position is currently as a component of the grant awarded to Richard Frackowiak. On the basis of past career and current work it is more appropriate for me to have independent funding. The work I plan will generate a substantial series of linked experiments in a number of cognitive domains. I anticipate that much of the day to day work will be carried out by a series of research fellows and PhD students. Long-term funding for the coordinator of this group is essential to provide continuity and coherence across these projects and to ensure an optimum environment for the training of a new generation of clinical neuroscientists. In addition, a long-term view is needed to ensure that the work of my group continues to feed into and benefit from developments in the other groups that compose the Functional Imaging Laboratory. Functional imaging techniques, particularly fMRI, are going to change and develop rapidly over the next ten years. My past career demonstrates that I have the flexibility to learn and take advantage of new developments as they arise. Long-term funding will obviate the shot-term risks associated with the exploitation of these new developments. My fundamental aim is to increase understanding of brain abnormalities underlying psychosis. Of necessity this is a long-term goal since much work on normal brain function is needed before cognitive paradigms and brain imaging techniques can be applied to the study of psychosis. This work will span at least a ten year period.

Amount: £18,848
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Bugs R Us 01 Oct 2008

The "Bugs R Us" project has been devised to bring the excitement of new developments in microbiology to as wide an audience as possible through a travelling exhibition with a 5-year shelf-life. Human beings are a symbiotic association of mammalian and microbial cells with the latter (the indigenous microbiota) outnumbering the former by a factor of ten. The indigenous microbiota is hugely diverse and consists of more than 2,000 different species which are organised into a variety of communities whose composition varies with the anatomical site. Although some species are able to cause disease, our microbial symbionts collectively exert a number of beneficial effects. Hence they protect us against pathogens, provide up to 10% of our energy requirements, supply a range of vitamins and play a key role in the development of our immune system and mucosal surfaces. Few people are aware of the importance of our indigenous microbiota and, because the populist view is "all microbes are dangerous and must be eliminated", it is important that this unwarranted view of microbes is corrected. By using modern exhibition techniques, talks and seminars we intend to: (i) introduce to the general public the concept that a human being is a symbiosis of mammalian and microbial cells (ii) provide new insights into the nature of the microbial communities that reside on our bodies, (iii) explain how the anatomical site governs the composition of the microbial community residing there (iv) describe what benefits these microbial communities confer on humans.

Amount: £29,375
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

InBodied. 01 Oct 2008

Artist and performer Catherine Long will collaborate with neuroscientists Professor Patrick Haggard and DR Beatriz Calvo-Merino, and dance/choreographer Frank Bock on research centred around embodiment and the relationship between brain and body. I will study the tension between the subjective and objective experience of the body, and the mechanics of the body, based on my unique physicality. The project will culminate in a performance (work in progress) involving movement, sound and video. This will address perceptions of and through the typical or atypical body, and the body's role in subjective experience. There will also be an exhibition of photographs and a short film will be made.

Amount: £30,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Pattern Completion 01 Oct 2008

The project brings together a neuroscientist, an artist and a sound designer to create an installation exploring how networks of brain cells recall memories. Audio-visual sequences will be projected onto a suspended spiral of glass spheres. Initially the images and sounds will be hard to decipher, but as time passes they become increasingly coherent, following a theoretical process known as pattern completion. The installation will invite the audience to consider how their brain pieces together a memory and the implications this has for how our memories are structured.

Amount: £29,929
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

The Point of Perception. 01 Oct 2008

This project explores the area of ambiguity in perception, which is inherent in the artworks of Madeleine Boyd and fundamental to the research of neuroscientists Mark Lythgoe and Beau Lotto. The practice-based research nature of this project will provide a frame work for both artistic and scientific partners to develop their own work as well as producing work together. A series of scientifically driven events based around Boyd's sculptural environments will allow the collaborators to generate a genuinely interdisciplinary methodology. The series culminates with an exhibition, catalogue and discussion day, all aimed at reaching targeted audiences effectively.

Amount: £28,960
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Neurogenesis in the mouse telencephalon. 21 Oct 2008

The molecular mechanisms regulating neuronal development in the telencephalon are largely unknown. The aims of the project are twofold: (1) examine the role of the transcription factor NKX2.1 in immature postmitotic neurons of the telencephalon and (2) identify genes involved in the development of neuronal populations in the embryonic subcortical telencephalon.

Amount: £34,720
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Properties of oligodendrocyte precursor cells. 21 Oct 2008

This project will investigate the properties of oligodendrocyte precursor cells, examining in particular their response to neurotransmitters, their voltage-gated currents, their role in myelination, their developmental fate and their effects on nearby neurons.

Amount: £12,700
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

MA in History of Medicine 16 Sep 2008

Not available

Amount: £45,616
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

The World Health Organization and the social determinants of health: assessing theory, policy and practice (an international conference). 29 Aug 2008

The World Health Oraganisation and the Social Determinants of Health: Assessing theory, policy and practice (An international conference).

Amount: £850
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

No time for panic: British responses to influenza in peace and war, 1889-1919 29 Aug 2008

The 1918 influenza pandemic represents the worst outbreak of infectious disease in Britain in modern times. Although the virus swept the world in three waves between March 1918 and April 1919, in Britain the majority of the estimated 228,000 fatalities occurred in the autumn of 1918. In London alone deaths at the peak of the epidemic were 55.5 per 1,000- the highest since the 1849 cholera epidemic. Yet in the capital as in other great cities and towns throughout Britain, there was none of the panic that had accompanied earlier 19th century outbreaks of infectious disease at the heart of urban populations. Instead, the British response to the 'Spanish Lady' as the pandemic strain of flu was familiarly known was remarkably sanguine. As The Times commented at the height of the pandemic: 'Never since the Black Death has such a plague swept over the face of the world, [and] never, perhaps, has a plague been more stoically accepted.' The apparent absence of marked social responses to the 1918 influenza is a phenomenon much remarked on in the literature of the pandemic, as is the apparent paradox that despite the widespread morbidity and high mortality the pandemic had little apparent impact on public institutions and left few traces in public memory. However, to date no one has explored the deeper cultural 'narratives' that informed and conditioned these responses. Was Britain really a more stoical and robust nation in 1918, or was the absence of medical and other social responses a reflection of the particular social and political conditions that prevailed in Britain during the First World War and then medical nosologies and cultural perceptions of influenza? And if the 1918 pandemic was 'overshadowed,' as one writer puts it, by the war and the peace that followed the Armistice, what explains the similarly muted response to the Russian flu pandemic of the early 1890's, a disease outbreak that coincided with a long period of peace and stability in Britain? In this project I aim to show that, contrary to previous studies, both the 1918 and the 1889-92 Russian flu pandemic were the objects of much deeper public concern and anxiety than has previously been acknowledged and that the morbidity of prominent members of British society, coupled with the high mortality, occasioned widespread 'dread' and in some cases alarm. However, in 1918 at least, government departments and public institutions actively suppressed these concerns for the sake of the war effort and the maintenance of national morale.

Amount: £657
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Open Access Award. 16 Sep 2008

Not available

Amount: £40,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London