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Recipients:
University of Oxford

Results

lvermectin Safety in Small Children 30 Sep 2020

lvermectin is a very safe and beneficial drug which is used for the treatment of more than a dozen different neglected tropical diseases (NTDs), many of which are associated with important public health problems. Current label indications for ivermectin prevent use in small children weighing less than 15kg, due to limited safety data in this group. Many of the NTD treatment options for small children rely on compounds that are less safe and/or efficacious compared to oral ivermectin. Our proposal will establish the safety and pharmacokinetics of escalating doses of ivermectin to treat scabies infected children weighing less than 15kg. The safety assessment will provide crucial evidence on the use of ivermectin for numerous diseases in children weighing less than 15kg. The information from measuring drug concentrations in the patients will inform the optimal dosing of this drug in small children. Assessment of the efficacy of ivermectin, compared to permethrin cream, for the treatment of scabies in small children can provide an important alternative treatment for this widespread disease.

Amount: £510,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Open Access (COAF) award 2019/20 30 Sep 2020

Not available

Amount: £1,157,238
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship Programme - University of Oxford 30 Sep 2019

<p>This award is for 6 students per year for 5 years. It includes ?a salary at the national living wage plus holiday pay and national insurance or equivalent,?as well as?funds to cover or significantly subsidise accommodation and travel (&pound;1500 outside of London and up to &pound;2000 in London).??? It includes &pound;500 to each studentship towards research expenses.??? Unspent funds can be repurposed on further students or recruitment costs.&nbsp; Wellcome wishes to ensure a greater diversity of students (in relation to socio-economic background and ethnicity) progress to postgraduate research.&nbsp;<br> Over 5 years of the Programme we encourage organisations to aim for:&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> <br> -At least 50% of students recruited to the programme to be from underrepresented or disadvantaged groups, depending on priorities set by each organisation.&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> <br> -At least 50% of students recruited to the programme to be from non-Russell Group Universities. For the remaining 50%, organisations should consider how to recruit students from other universities as well as their own. Wellcome has included this recommended target as research indicates that most of the high-achieving STEMM graduates from minority ethnic backgrounds are located outside of Russell Group universities.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £166,500
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Spot Sepsis 30 Sep 2019

Spot Sepsis is a multi-site prospective observational cohort study, conceived by the Mahidol-Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit (MORU) and Médecins Sans Frontières Spain (MSF SPAIN). Over 15 months, we will enroll a minimum of 4,900 children between the age of one month and five years with acute febrile illness presenting to six regional hospitals across Asia (Indonesia, Philippines, Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam and Bangladesh). We will collect key historical variables, record presenting clinical features, measure host biomarker profiles, and determine fever aetiology for key target pathogens. We will follow children up and ascertain clinical outcome at 48-hours and 28-days. Using this data, we will derive and perform external validation of a risk stratification algorithm, to predict progression to severe disease in children presenting with acute febrile illness in resource limited settings. The project, a partnership between MORU and MSF SPAIN, is motivated by a shared translational research vision: a desire to improve identification of children with acute infections at-risk for progressing to severe illness or sepsis. This will in turn allow more efficient and effective referral choices in more remote contexts, particularly those affected by conflict, where the decision to refer a child to higher care carries substantial risk or burden. We will benefit from the collaboration with our project partners, who have considerable experience in biomarker discovery/validation and clinical prediction rule (CPR) derivation and validation. The project is being co-funded by MSF Spain and the Wellcome Trust through the ‘Innovations for Impact in low and middle-income countries’ Flagship.

Amount: £498,240
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Consolidating practice in social science research for Ebola, DRC. 30 Sep 2019

<p style="margin-left: 0cm; margin-right: 0cm">The response to the Ebola epidemic in North Kivu and Ituri provinces, Democratic Republic of Congo has been described as one of the most complex that national and international communities have had to face.Given the complexity of this protracted epidemic, social science research has become a critically important part of the response in order to help contextualise strategies, investigate social determinants of infection, and inform understanding and reception of interventions employed for outbreak control. To routinely generate this intelligence,&nbsp;&nbsp;an innovative solution has emerged in the form of the Cellule d&rsquo;Analyse en Sciences Sociales. UNICEF-funded, this group is made up predominantly of local and national social scientists.&nbsp;&nbsp;Other ad hoc social science research is also being conducted in the field. Through this proposal we aim to consolidate learning and articulate what is needed to replicate similar initiatives in future outbreaks. We will provide remote technical support, conduct structured critical appraisal of the field experience, capture lessons learned, and develop guidance and tools for the current and for future outbreaks. Our vision is to contribute to better outbreak prevention and response through excellence in social and behavioural science research, integrated into current and future responses to infectious disease threats.&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £75,161
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford
Amount: £12,456
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Health of the Arts 11 Jun 2019

<p>The proposed project takes up the message of arts access charity Arts Emergency to ask 'is an arts emergency a health emergency?' and also to ask the question of who gets to access the arts from an interdisciplinary perspective.</p> <p>Recent medical humanities research shows us that the arts have a critical role to play in health and wellbeing, both at an individual level and in terms of society as a whole. Meanwhile, government cuts mean that access to the arts&nbsp;&mdash;and therefore by extension interdisciplinary arts&mdash;are in danger of becoming an elite pursuit as value increases but public funding decreases.</p> <p>There are two key strands to this work:&nbsp;</p> <p>1. To use the findings of interdisciplinary research on the value of the arts to public and personal health to make the case for arts access &amp; funding.</p> <p>2. To investigate&nbsp;access to the medical&nbsp;humanities. What skill sets, mentoring, funding, and opportunities do school leavers from diverse and underprivileged need to pursue interdisciplinary projects?&nbsp;</p> <p>This 6-month project aims to broaden access to the interdisciplinary arts, to establish a network of medical humanities mentors, and&nbsp;to design medical humanities skills training.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £16,954
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

State of the art lipidomics 04 Jul 2019

<p style="margin-left: 0cm; margin-right: 0cm">As a result of a close collaboration&nbsp;with Thermo Fisher, and three visits to their factory in San Jose,&nbsp;modifications and designs have been iterated that have resulted in a modified Orbitrap Fusion Lumos tribrid mass spectrometer (MS).&nbsp;&nbsp;Critically this unique MS platform&nbsp;not only retains resolution at both high and low m/z ranges but also enables multiple rounds of tandem MS for state of the art lipidomics. Proof-of-principle&nbsp;data demonstrate that the instrument is &nbsp;capable of maintaining&nbsp;native&nbsp;membrane protein complexes and also, within the same experiment, characterising&nbsp;the lipids/ligands that regulate them.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin-left: 0cm; margin-right: 0cm">Our goals&nbsp;are to&nbsp;identify critical lipids/ligands through high resolution&nbsp;native MS of membrane protein assemblies as well as&nbsp;multiple rounds of MS/MS (MSn). Additional goals include developing&nbsp;fast fragmentation methods, such as UVPD, to define&nbsp;lipid binding sites within intact assemblies. &nbsp;Effectively this platform enables for the first time, top-down lipidomics directly from membrane protein assemblies. Importantly the&nbsp;direct link between the lipid and the parent protein-complex is maintained throughout the experiment providing a step change over&nbsp;current methods which involve&nbsp;separate lipid extraction and proteomics experiments. There is a high unmet need for this MS platform&nbsp;with multiple users and many exciting applications.&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £808,928
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Flagship translational resource: Critical Care/Rural fever 30 Sep 2019

<p>The MORU, a Wellcome Africa Asia Programme (APP), is a strategic partner of Wellcome Innovations flagship &ldquo;Innovation for impact in LMICs&rdquo; undertaking a number of translational research projects related to this flagship portfolio. The flagship translational resource supports common infrastructural and discipline capacity needed to support the Flagship programmes.</p>

Amount: £925,102
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Flagship translational resource: Critical Care/Rural fever 30 Sep 2019

<p>The MORU, a Wellcome Africa Asia Programme (APP), is a strategic partner of Wellcome Innovations flagship &ldquo;Innovation for impact in LMICs&rdquo; undertaking a number of translational research projects related to this flagship portfolio. The flagship translational resource supports common infrastructural and discipline capacity needed to support the Flagship programmes.</p>

Amount: £52,363
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Open Access (COAF) Award 2018/19 30 Sep 2019

Not available

Amount: £1,171,479
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Institutional Strategic Support Fund 30 Sep 2019

Not available

Amount: £2,000,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Human sensitivity to short-wavelength light in non-image-forming vision: Toward a mechanistic understanding of the impact of blue light on sleep and circadian rhythms 30 Sep 2019

<p>In chronobiology and sleep research, a significant proportion of past research studies examining the effects of light on the acute suppression of melatonin and on circadian photoentrainment have exclusively examined male participants, or naturally cycling female participants. The basis for this bias in participant recruitment is empirical evidence that the production of melatonin may be modulated by the menstrual cycle and, in this context, also by the use of hormonal contraceptives. To avoid these potentially &quot;confounding&quot; effects, exclusion criteria are typically used to exclude women who use hormonal&nbsp;contraceptives, thereby ignoring a large proportion of the population.</p> <p>The goal of this <em>Diversity &amp; Inclusion</em> activity is to increase our knowledge on sex-based biases in the scientific literature on the non-visual effects of light. To this end, the project has two main objectives:</p> <ul> <li>(1) Developing the<strong> first&nbsp;systematic&nbsp;survey of sex representation in research studies on the non-visual effects of light</strong>. This will be accomplished using a pre-registered systematic review, using a well-defined database search strategy and standardised&nbsp;information extraction methods regarding the recruitment of men and women in these studies (sample size, proportion of female subjects, hormonal status).</li> <li>(2) Developing an <strong>open-access&nbsp;toolkit&nbsp;for researchers on addressing sex biases in participant recruitment in chronobiology and sleep studies</strong>, outlining the problem as well as practical solutions.&nbsp;This will be accomplished using a small round-table workshop of diverse invited junior and senior researchers in the field of chronobiology.</li> </ul>

Amount: £20,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Open Research: Thailand Major Overseas Programme 2015 - 2020 15 Nov 2018

<p style="margin-left: 0cm; margin-right: 0cm">This application is led by Phaik Yeong Cheah, the head of Bioethics &amp; Engagement and co-led by Naomi Waithira, the head of Data Management and supported by Nicholas Day, the Director of the Programme.&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin-left: 0cm; margin-right: 0cm">Upon successful completion of the activity, we would have achieved the following:</p> <p style="margin-left: 0cm; margin-right: 0cm">1). Created materials for 3-day face-to-face &ldquo;Short course on data sharing policy: data management, data governance and data ethics&rdquo;. This course will be ready to be delivered to research groups when requested. The proposed modules are as follows:</p> <ol> <li>Introduction and course objectives</li> <li>Data Sharing requirements from funders and journals</li> <li>Data management: a pre-requisite of data sharing (e.g. data dictionaries, CDISC)</li> <li>Legal and ethical aspects of data sharing (potential benefits and harms, consent models)</li> <li>Principles of data re-use (data attribution, citation, data sharing agreements, how to apply for a dataset)</li> <li>Elements of clinical research set-up (protocol development, information sheets, quality control)</li> <li>Technical and IT infrastructure (storage, backup, security, de-identification)</li> <li>Analytic infrastructure and meta-data</li> <li>Data repositories (types of repositories, how to make your data visible)</li> <li>Data sharing plan</li> <li>Data sharing policy and data governance (application procedures, types of governance, data access committees)</li> <li>Costing data sharing (human resources, legal costs, data management &ndash;investment and cost per dataset shared)</li> </ol> <p>2)&nbsp;Created a&nbsp;short online training course on Globalhealthtrials&nbsp;(https://globalhealthtrainingcentre.tghn.org/elearning/short-courses/). We have had preliminary discussions with the Training Manager for Globalhealthtrials, Liam Boggs.&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin-left: 0cm; margin-right: 0cm">3) A data-sharing toolkit with templates of documents needed to operationalize a data sharing policy.</p> <p style="margin-left: 0cm; margin-right: 0cm">4)&nbsp;A core group of of trainers for the face-to-face training&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £49,257
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Ebola East DRC August 2018 30 Sep 2018

<p>The goal of this submission is to provide immediate support to the&nbsp;Institut Nationale De Recherche Biomedicale (INRB) for&nbsp;the implementation of Monitored Emergency Use&nbsp;of MAb114 during the ongoing Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) outbreak in Eastern DRC, and&nbsp;to strengthen capacity to implement a formal clinical trial of candidate therapeutics, as identified as a priority in the national EVD research plan.</p> <p>Support is requested for INRB administration, logistics, consumables and personal costs, and for training and capacity development activities.</p>

Amount: £174,946
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Epigenetic mapping of immune cells in colorectal cancer 24 Apr 2018

<p>A recent large-scale study of 39 different types of cancers has shown that the expression of the gene <em>KLRB1</em>, encoding the protein CD161, was the top predictor of favourable prognosis and overall survival. CD161 is expressed on various immune cells, including newly discovered populations such as MAIT cells and innate lymphoid cells. To identify the intratumoural cells contributing to improved prognosis, I will develop a tool for the bioinformatic enumeration of pure cell types from complex populations. As chromatin accessibility and enhancer landscape reflects cell identify better than mRNA levels, differentially accessible loci will be a unique signature for each cell type. Using state-of-the-art technologies, my key goals are to:</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <ol> <li><strong>Generate a comprehensive epigenetic signature matrix encompassing novel immune cell types</strong></li> <li><strong>Use this to deconvolute the epigenome of colorectal carcinoma tumours</strong></li> <li><strong>Directly identify the infiltrating CD161-expressing population correlated with improved survival in colorectal cancer</strong></li> </ol> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>By improving our understanding of how multiple immune populations collectively infiltrate tumours, including novel CD161-expressing cells, this work will enable future cancer immunotherapies to target protective immune subsets. Furthermore, the proposed work will provide a resource that can be easily applied to epigenetic data from other malignancies.</p>

Amount: £250,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford
Amount: £11,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Discretionary Award 30 Sep 2017

<p>'Sacred Water' &ndash; an engagement project run by artist Lena Bui, was a creative space for researchers at OUCRU-Nepal and people living in the Kathmandu Valley to discuss health with a focus on water.&nbsp; However, the earthquake of 2015 caused many participants to reflect&nbsp;on a wider view of health. Lena became interested in what people turn to for a sense of wellbeing&nbsp;- cultural rituals, western medicine, traditional healers, astrologers, or god.&nbsp; She developed a script based on personal accounts and will now continue the collaboration with OUCRU-NP and the local community to develop the project into an exhibition with a feature-length film as an exploration of health beyond the functioning of a physical body. &nbsp;</p> <p>The film, <em>A Vertical Walk, </em>is a mixture of documentary, travelogue, essay video and experimental images, taking the viewers&nbsp;through landscapes shaped by accounts and fragments of dreams and memories. A public exhibition, held in Kathmandu, will consist of the film, animations, larger paintings and open discussions with the artist and researchers. We will collaborate with a local venue to create a space promoting reflection on the essence of resilience and the role of culture and faith in our existence and sense of wellbeing.</p>

Amount: £40,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Facing ethics: Identifying ethical issues in computational phenotyping research 30 Sep 2017

<p>Computational phenotyping research uses big data methods to refine the diagnosis of rare genetic diseases. Photographs (and other biomedical data) of people with genetic syndromes are used to train machine-learning algorithms to identify the phenotypic features associated with different disorders. The data are obtained from consortia of clinicians and researchers involved in rare disease research, and directly from patients themselves through online direct participation initiatives. This research programme will identify ethical issues arising from the use of photographic images in computational phenotyping research.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>This grant will enable us to: a) undertake exploratory interviews with data&ndash;sharing consortium members and patient group representatives to determine their perceptions of ethical issues arising from the sharing and use of photographic data in phenotyping research b) undertake a scoping literature review concerning the use of photographs in (biomedical) research, and c) hold a meeting of Consortium members to disseminate and discuss findings of the pilot work. The expectation is that this will lead to a collaborative proposal that will develop an ethical position on the sharing of image data and explore research participants&rsquo; views of the use of their photographs and other data in phenotyping research.</p>

Amount: £27,408
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Vacation Scholarships 2017 - University of Oxford 16 Jun 2017

<p>Vacation Scholarships 2017-University of Oxford</p>

Amount: £15,500
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford