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Current Filters

Funders:
The Wellcome Trust
Recipients:
Oxford Brookes University
Amounts:
£500 - £1,000

Results

Oxford history of chemistry seminar series to be held in Oxford on 9 and 23 February 2011 17 Jan 2011

Intellectual historians can hardly disregard the role played by alchemical practices (experiments, theories, circulation of books and manuscripts, constitution of networks covering the entire European continent and several early colonial settlements) in the agenda of Early Modern learning. Equally, studies published over the last twenty years have much contributed to the appreciation of the role of chemistry in the constitution of research practices in science, technology and medicine, and to the key social and intellectual role played by practitioners of chemistry during the XVIII and XIX centuries. Finally, business historians or historians of innovation (including therapeutic innovation) can hardly escape confronting the complex interactions between university and industrial research on a continental and intercontinental level throughout the XX century. The main goal of the Oxford History of Chemistry Seminar series, which is in its 4th year this year, has been to assert the centrality of the history of chemistry to a variety of research areas dealing with the social, intellectual and economic history of Europe (and beyond) over the last five centuries.

Amount: £525
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Oxford Brookes University

'Chemistry and pharmacy in the colonial world' to be held at Oxford Brookes University 13th May 2010 18 Jan 2010

Intellectual historians cannot ignore the role played by alchemical practices (experiments, theories, circulation of books and manuscripts, constitution of networks covering the entire European continent and several early colonial settlements) in the agenda of Early Modern learning. Equally, studies published over the last twenty years have much contributed to the appreciation of the role of chemistry in the constitution of research practices in science, technology and medicine, and to the key social and intellectual role played by practitioners of chemistry during the 18th and 19th centuries. Finally, business historians or historians of innovation (including therapeutic innovation) can hardly escape confronting the complex interactions between university and industrial research on a continental and intercontinental level throughout the 20th century. The main goal of the joint Oxford History of Chemistry Seminar series, of which this session is to be a part, is therefore to explore and assert the centrality of the history of chemistry to a variety of research areas dealing with the social, intellectual and economic history of Europe (and beyond) over the last five centuries.

Amount: £600
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Oxford Brookes University

The creation and early workings of the Health Service "Ombudsman", 1968-1976: historical and archival research looking into the creation, and first remit, of the Health Service Commissioner. 23 Jan 2006

The creation and early workings of the Health Service "Ombudsman", 1968-1976: historical and archival research looking into the creation, and first remit, of the Health Service Commissioner This is an application for travel expenses, further to pursue research into the creation and early history of the National Health Service 'Ombudsman'. This is the body that, since the early 1970s, has provided an avenue of complaint against 'maladministration' in the NHS. The work should clearly reflect on to contemporary practice, for the Ombudsman was to become one of the most ubiquitous new tools of government in the late twentieth century. The project asks why this was so and where the pressure came from for this reform. This being so, it should cast light on the wider mechanics of British government and politics in the post-Second World War era. The applicant has already been pursuing research into the creation of the Parliamentary Commissioner for Administration. It is envisaged that this will lead to the submission of an article to Past in Present in 2007, covering the creation of the original Parliamentary 'Ombudsman'. It is now intended to take the research on a further stage, and build on the primary evidence assembled on the Parliamentary Commissioner. The first 'Ombudsman', Sir Edmund Compton, started work in 1967. The Health Service Commissioner was not created until 1973, when Sir Alan Marre as Compton's successor took on that role. Why was the Health Service initially insulated from the work of the Parliamentary Commissioner? Why did views change about that exclusion? Why did the process take so long? Did different departments have different views? These are the questions this research will seek to answer, utilising primary materials from government, MPs and political parties. Although there are admirable histories of the Ombudsman institution in general available, especially The Ombudsman, The Citizen and Parliament by Gregory and Giddings, this will be the first historical work systematically to utilise the archives and to find out the reasons for the creation of the NHS Ombudsman, as well as the delay in its inception following the creation of the Parliamentary Commissioner for Administration.

Amount: £901
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Oxford Brookes University

For a meeting entitled 'The Sites of Chemistry, 1600-2000' to be held in 2010 to 2012. 19 Mar 2012

The series. of 4 conferences will explore the range of physical spaces and places in which chemistry has been practised from the I7th to the 20th centuries focusing on Europe. Each conference aims to understand for a particular century (broadly defined), and in a comparative perspective: I. who was practising chemistry, where, how, to what ends, and the physical, social and cultural organisation of these sites of practice; 2. the wider social, economic, political and cultural contexts for the practice of chemistry through detailed examination of chemists' interactions, in and around these sites, with other actors; in particular 3. the relations between chemical and medical practices, ranging through the apothecary's shop, the medical faculty: the hospital, the government laboratory, the biosciences research institute and the pharmaceutical company. Taken together, the four conferences aim to elucidate long-term developments in the organisation and practice of chemistry within a broad comparative perspective. The conferences will establish a network of historians, stimulate collaborative projects and support graduate students and new researchers.

Amount: £940
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Oxford Brookes University