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Engaging School Communities with Health Research and Science in Kilifi District, Kenya: Extension Award. 31 Aug 2011

Community engagement and forming collaborative partnerships between researchers and communities are widely recognised as core principles of ethical research [1]. We propose to pilot an innovative schools engagement initiative to strengthen the partnership between researchers, the education sector, and the local communities who participate in research. The proposed initiative will be conducted by the KEMRI-Wellcome programme in Kilifi. Programme researchers are drawn from all over Kenya and East Africa, and research results are utilised throughout Africa. Nevertheless, knowledge of science and research in Kilifi district itself is limited, in part due to poor access to educational and health resources. The schools engagement initiative will be conducted using a participatory action research approach in order to maximize stakeholder buy-in, sustainability and potential effectiveness. Three district secondary schools will be selected for pilot interventions aimed at improving the understanding of science and health research, and at stimulating young people to question their own attitudes towards science. Activities will include: teacher workshops; student centred activities such as competitions, dramas, journal clubs etc.; and interactions with researchers such as school visits, career talks, inspirational lectures. Effectiveness of the process and activities will be evaluated through pre and post intervention surveys, focus group discussions, in-depth

Amount: £2,908,121
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Babraham Institute

Mechanisms of client protein activation and regulation by the Hsp90 molecular chaperone system. 10 May 2011

The Hsp90 molecular chaperone plays an essential role in the stabilisation andactivation of a wide range of client' proteins, including some of the most important proteins required for cell maintenance and regulation in eukaryotic organisms from yeast to humans. Hsp90 itself is regulated by a plethora of co-chaperone proteins that modulate its essential ATPase coupled conformational cycle, and/or act as adaptors facilitating recruitment of specific client proteins to the Hsp90 machinery. Involvement of Hsp90-dependent clients in the development and progression of cancer, has led to enormous interest in Hsp90 as a drug target, and an emerging realisation of Hsp90 involvement in viral and and parasitic infections, suggests that Hsp90 is important in many other diseases. Although much of the biochemistry of the Hsp90 system has been unravelled in recent years, central questions of Hsp90 biology remain unanswered. To address this, we propose to define at the structural level the molecular mechanisms by which the Hsp90 molecular chaperone system contributes to the activation, stabilization and regulation of its selected client' proteins in eukaryotic cells

Amount: £2,804,975
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Sussex

Cinema 3. 14 Jul 2011

Cinema 3 will be an immersive art installation that induces an out-of-body experience in the viewer. The work will be presented in a specially designed exhibition environment, in which viewers watch live 3-Dimensional video footage of themselves on a screen as they appear to ascend from the ground and fly through the air, and at the same time feel as though they are floating. Developed from Professor Olaf Blanke's groundbreaking experiments, which have shown that, using closed-circuit 3-D video, sensory perception can be re-organised to induce a measurable 'out-of-body experience' (Lenggenhager et al., Science 2007, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17717189), Cinema 3 will enable audiences to experience a unique sense of disembodiment. The installation will bring to life this area of research for a broad audience, and will connect the neurological study of the body's perception of its location with the cinematic experience, particularly in relation to the creation of new relationships between viewer and screen enabled by 3-D and interactive technologies.

Amount: £132,167
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Forma Arts & Media Ltd

Master's Studentship 12 Jul 2011

Not available

Amount: £19,105
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

Hospitals in Colonial Calcutta 1757-1900 20 May 2011

Over the past few decades, academic research on medical history of colonial India have mostly concentrated on Public Health Policy of colonial government and the ingenious contrivance between colonial power and medicine in the formation of an empire. The history of hospitals in the colonies has been a relatively neglected area of research. The project intends to specifically study the social and political environment that spurred the development of hospitals in Calcutta under the East India Company's rule from 1757 to 1900. The discussion will narrate the formal history of the foundation of the hospitals in Colonial Calcutta from the late Eighteenth century under the Company's rule based on Government records, reports, surveys, newspapers and journals. The key goal of the project is to study the 'political ecology' of early hospital system in Calcutta during the Company's rule. The main emphasis would be on several key issues like l. the process of institutionalization of medical care for the indigenous people in the backdrop of a rising consciousness about public health in 2. A study of the social political structures of the colonial city that helped to create the hospitals and their relationship with the indigenous people 3. Social response of the indigenous groups

Amount: £1,600
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Misc India

The Lice Feeders: Typhus, Science and Survival in the Polish Holocaust 21 Feb 2011

The goal of my research in the UK is to further my knowledge in the areas relevant to the completion of a book (working title listed as Q2) on typhus disease and typhus vaccines during WWII. In addition I wish to examine special files that are relevant to the lives and times of my principal subjects, Ludwik Fleck and Rudolf Weigl. (see Q10) I will spend my research time in the UK on the following: --studying documents at the National Archive related to British wartime typhus vaccine preparations and typhus prevention policies, as well as postwar British evaluations of German typhus vaccines, disease experiences and the German military medical establishment. --studying personal files and interviews with Holocaust/WWII survivors at the Imperial War Museum, including Special Operations Executive members who were imprisoned at Buchenwald concentration camp and were protected through contacts in the typhus ward there. --reviewing documents made available to me by Oxford-Brookes Professor Paul Weindling, from his personal collection. These include interviews with wartime employees of Rudolf Weigl and testimony from erstwhile colleagues of Ludwik Fleck.

Amount: £1,841
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Misc United States

Open access award 2011/12. 20 Sep 2011

Not available

Amount: £20,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Queen's University Belfast

Open access award 2011/12. 20 Sep 2011

Not available

Amount: £30,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Royal Veterinary College

Open access award. 20 Sep 2011

Not available

Amount: £60,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds

Open access award. 20 Sep 2011

Not available

Amount: £45,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Liverpool

Open access award. 20 Sep 2011

Not available

Amount: £150,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London

Open access award. 20 Sep 2011

Not available

Amount: £200,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Imperial College London

Open access award. 20 Sep 2011

Not available

Amount: £250,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

'The Home Front - engaging the armed forces on mental illness.' 13 Jul 2011

The aim of this project is to investigate, pilot and evaluate the effectiveness of using comedy with armed service personnel, as a way of: stimulating interest and engaging them in the biomedical area of mental illness (and related substance misuse); encouraging new ways of thinking about and supporting informal learning about this area. Despite the inherent occupational risk factors for mental illness within the armed forces, there is little engagement of personnel in this area due to: limited understanding of mental illness, the stigma that surrounds this area, and a culture/way of thinking among personnel which associate mental illness with signs of weakness. Engagement and participation will be achieved through: - Discussion sessions with the target group to explore their knowledge around mental illness and help inform the script development (and pitch the content and style of the show appropriately) - Including relevant contributions to the show from armed service personnel to harness the positive effect of peer learning and to help 'normalise' mental health problems, thereby challenging stigma. Evaluation will be designed in collaboration with the Institute of Psychiatry and will gather both pre and post intervention quantitative and qualitative data on armed forces personnel's: attitudes, understanding/knowledge and engagement around the biomedical area of mental illness; and participation in the focus groups and the shows. This innovative project will form new collaborations and partnerships between the armed forces, the arts, academic institutions, and the charitable sector - to pilot this creative approach to engagement, participation and education in mental ill-health.

Amount: £10,936
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Misc Greater London

Explore science at the Edinburgh Film Festival. 20 May 2011

Edinburgh International Film Festival is partnering with Edinburgh Neuroscience and the University of Edinburgh in an exploration of the nexus of cinema, neuroscience and biomedical science. This partnership will exist as a strand of events, interactive screenings and cinematic experiments throughout the Festival. It will explore issues including how and why audiences empathise with what they see and hear on screen, how science is represented on screen, as well as using film to isolate, explore and amplify some key contemporary fields of scientific innovation. The partnership will engage new audiences with biomedical science and create an atmosphere that fosters the growth of interdisciplinary partnerships.

Amount: £30,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Edinburgh International Film Festival

The Dark Matter of Love 12 Apr 2011

This film is about three strange and ferocious things; love, science and small children. In it there are two seven year old orphaned boys; Alexei and Dimitri. One is about to learn how to become part of a family the other has just been removed from one. Scientists will be assisting the boys with their transitions. The boys? stories will be split into chapters and between each chapter an archival interstitial will tell the story of a breakthrough in medical and psychological approaches to mother child love. As Alexei and Dimitri learn how to form human relationships we explore the experiments that yielded insights into the dark matter of love. Many films have been made about the effects of abandonment on young children but this will be the first to contextualize these stories within our ever-evolving medical and psychological approaches to love. The universality of mother child love makes the boys? journeys intensely moving, giving audiences a chance to engage with a scientific history of love emotionally as well as intellectually.

Amount: £30,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Double Bounce

75th Anniversary MH&E Award 01 Sep 2011

Since its inception in 1995 the Malawi-Liverpool-Wellcome (MLW) Programme has become an internationally recognised centre for research and research training. Malawi faces a disproportionate burden of serious health problems related to deprivation, a high prevalence of infectious disease and an over-stretched health infrastructure. Many of these health threats are potentially preventable or treatable. Attempts to tackle these threats are severely limited by the absence of a fundamental understand ing of disease process and the lack of diagnostic and interventional tools on which to base a comprehensive public health strategy. The origins, epidemiology and mechanisms of many of the underlying diseases remain unknown. There is an urgent need to identify and better understand the biological events, biomarkers, targets and disease pathways that will lead to the development of affordable diagnostic tools and therapeutic interventions. The MLW Programme therefore aims to: (1) Conduct biomedica l research on tropical health problems in a place where those problems occur; (2) Provide training in research skills for clinical and laboratory scientists both from the host country and abroad; (3) Strengthen the local institution (College of Medicine) in its capacity to conduct research on health problems of local importance.