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Amounts:
£1,000 - £5,000

Results

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship. 20 May 2011

Not available

Amount: £1,520
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of London

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship. 20 May 2011

Not available

Amount: £4,560
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Westminster

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship. 20 May 2011

Not available

Amount: £1,440
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Sussex

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship. 20 May 2011

Not available

Amount: £1,520
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Birkbeck University of London

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship. 20 May 2011

Not available

Amount: £1,520
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Roehampton University

Travel Grant to Develop Research Proposal: Clinical and Public Health Researchers' Perspectives about Research Ethics in India. 13 Jul 2010

There has been relatively little research in developing countries on the perspective of research investigators towards several ethical concerns which are critical to international research. As public health investigators, clinical divisions, and research centres around the world partner with Indian researchers, there are questions about establishing global ethics standards, necessary to ensure research integrity, protection of human subjects, trust between research partners, and institutional trust across borders (Benatar 2004' King & Stein 1999). Too often in practice, these universal standards are undermined by conflicting ethical standards, lack of capacity for local research ethics review, lack of fit with global ethics review regulations and process, and the challenges posed by the social, cultural, and political context in the host country (London 2002). Thus, understanding the perspectives from researchers in India, which is among the most important developing countries involved in international research, is an important and necessary step towards understanding these issues. This project aims to explore Indian research investigators' needs, challenges and difficulties faced in conducting international clinical and public health research. The study will explore the various dimensions of needs and concerns that must be addressed to build sustainable international research programs based on integrity, trust, and cross-cultural learning.

Amount: £2,080
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Anusandhan Trust

The physical therapy of neurasthenia, England 1895-1914 14 Jun 2010

This application seeks support to undertake a study examining the contribution made by early nurse-masseuses to the treatment of neurasthenia in England between 1894 and 1914. Neurasthenia, or nerve weakness, was a significant health concern in late Victorian England, coinciding with the birth of the profession now known as physiotherapy. Considerable scholarship exists examining the medical, psychological and social historical data surrounding neurasthenia, but there appears to be only circumstantial evidence pointing to the contribution made who actually administered massage, electrotherapy, rest and exercise as part of Weir Mitchell's Rest Cure and other similar approaches. The Society of Trained Masseuses (STM} was the forerunner of the physiotherapy profession in England. This study will initially examine first-hand accounts from nurse-masseuses who were members of the Society, and secondly scrutinise the writings of medical practitioners who were closely allied to the Society. The aim of the study is to substantiate anecdotal evidence that: 1. members of the STM played a pivotal role in the management of somatic symptoms associated with neurasthenia in England between 1894 and 1914 2. the STM's interest in the treatment of neurasthenia coincided with a wide range of historically significant discourses.

Amount: £1,462
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Auckland University of Technology

The demographic and economic impact of plague in Italy and England during 17th century 15 Feb 2010

Our understanding of the epidemiological characteristics of European plagues is still inadequate. Even if some specific waves of the disease, and most of all the Black Death, have been meticulously reconstructed and analysed, studies on the Early Modem epidemics have been much more limited in scope. By focussing on specific aspects of the disease, impossible to analyse on the basis of the more scanty Medieval documentation, these studies have generally failed to make clear the very varied characteristics assumed throughout Europe by the latest great plagues during the 17th century. In that period, epidemics struck different parts of the continent in very different ways. The South was more severely affected than the North, and Italy in particular had to face the most virulent plagues since the Black Death. As a result, plague had much more severe economic consequences for Southern European countries than for Northern European ones. This is contrary to the received wisdom, according to which plague acted like a 'great equalizer'. This project then aims at making it clear, first, that there are epidemiological characteristics of Early Modern plagues that have been overlooked till now; secondly, that from them depended the economic impact of the disease.

Amount: £1,500
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Misc Italy

Young women, deviance and public health in mid-twentieth century Britain 15 Feb 2010

I am currently undertaking a research project that examines the connections between concerns about young women's sexual and social deviance and worry over venereal disease. In the 1930s and the 1950s, there were a series of moral panics over the 'lorry girl': young women who would leave approved schools or their home towns and exchange sex for rides to London in the cabs of lorries. These moral panics centred around three key issues: firstly, the difficulty of controlling these young women who were socially and sexually deviant; secondly, the character of the 'lorry driver', who was seen as a facilitator of their deviance as well as its victim; and thirdly and most prominently, fears about the spread of venereal disease. It is my intention to explore these interconnected issues, which will help illuminate the ways that deviance and public venereal health were understood and dealt with in mid-twentieth century Britain, in the decades surrounding the Second World War and leading up to the so-called 'sexual revolution'. I intend to use this research produce the first in a series of articles on women and venereal disease in mid-twentieth century Britain.

Amount: £1,465
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: McGill University

Genome-wide DNase 1-hypersensitive sites ins byprofile in different mouse strains by DNase-sequencing. 15 Feb 2010

1. Construct massively parallel sequencing libraries from DNAse treated DNA obtained from erythroblasts from the reference strain, C57BL6/J. A library with the correct size distribution and validated by qPCR, will be used as the basis for comparison with data from other strains and as validation with array-based methods for DNAse hypersensitivity sites detection. 2. Construction of libraries from eight strains (A/J, AKR/J, C3H/HeJ, BALBc/J, CBA/J, DBA2/J and LP/J) previously used in a genome-wide mapping experiment of multiple phenotypes (included full blood count) 3. Mapping of hypersensitivity sites onto the whole genome sequences of these strains (obtained from the Sanger institute) 4. Validation of the functional involvement of sequence variants and comparison with the position of quantitative trait loci contributing to haematopoietic phenotypes

Amount: £1,736
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

The roles for Slit/Robo proteins in the and regulation of chemokine function and cell movement. 30 Nov 2009

Since the discovery of its importance in the development of the nervous system, the Slit/Robo signalling pathway has become more and more remarkable among pathways of intercellular communication. Initially identified for roles in axon guidance, it is now clear that the Slit/Robo system regulates a complex range of other biological processes involved in the development and growth of various organs and tissues. Moreover, the Slit/Robo signalling axis has also been implicated in cancer. Most recently a role for Slit/Robo in regulating chemokine-dependent leukocyte migration during immune and inflammatory responses, has been demonstrated. In spite of the clear biological importance for Slit/Robo in these diverse biological systems, there remain many unanswered questions of relevance to Slit/Robo function. It is the aim of this project to take 2 approaches to studying the biology of this system. Specifically we propose to examine, in detail, roles for Slit/Robo signalling in the control of leukocyte migration and in addition, we propose to use biochemical and cellular approaches to detail the mechanism of Slit/Robo transmembrane signalling. The aims of our project are: 1) To examine the roles for Slit/Robo in the regulation of chemokine-dependent leukocyte migration 2) To examine the cellular mode of action of Robo by directly imaging its cell membrane positioning and oligomerisation status and its association with chemokine receptors or their downstream signalling components.

Amount: £3,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Glasgow

The Session Extension 24 Jun 2013

Not available

Amount: £2,200
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Likely Story (UK)

From Hunter to Helmand: Military Medicine Then and Now. 30 Aug 2013

To mark the commemoration of the outbreak of the First World War in 2014, the Hunterian Museum at the Royal College of Surgeons will hold a 2-day conference 'From Hunter to Helmand: Military Medicine Then and Now' (Friday 14 - Saturday 15 November 2014). This will accompany an arts project, 'War, Art and Surgery' and its associated publication. Bringing together medical and military history experts as well as current serving military medical staff, 'From Hunter to Helmand' will chart the deve lopment of military medicine from John Hunter in the eighteenth century through the Napoleonic era, Crimea, the World Wars to current campaigns in Iraq and Afghanistan. Speakers will engage with the range of military medical practice, including nursing, naval surgery, military psychiatry and medical training for the modern battlefield. To the rich nationwide cultural offer co-ordinated by the Imperial War Museum in 2014, 'From Hunter to Helmand' will provide a unique platform for exchange be tween cultural historians, military clinicians and their patients. It will appeal to students, academics and practitioners in medicine and the humanities, especially medical history and war studies.

Amount: £4,300
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Royal College of Surgeons of England

Medical Theories of Exhaustion: A Historical Analysis. 30 Aug 2013

This workshop analyses changing medical conceptions of exhaustion. Exhaustion features as a core symptom in various other diagnoses, such as burn-out, CFS, depression, neurasthenia and melancholia. Yet the arguments that shape both the scholarly and the popular image of exhaustion, and the narratives that medical and other writers produce to explain interior processes and the relation between the individual's energy reserves and society, fluctuate historically. They can provide valuable insights into medical (and other) paradigm changes. Exhaustion can be understood as a subjective physical, psychological and spiritual experience, but also as a broader cultural occurrence, which may involve phenomena such as political and philosophical disenchantment, anxieties about sustainability and economic pessimism. Physically, exhaustion manifests itself as chronic fatigue, whilst on a psychological level, we could describe it as weariness, disillusionment, hopelessness, lassitude, and lack of m otivation. Exhaustion, however, is rarely encountered on its own in medical accounts as it frequently overlaps with other diagnostic entities. This workshop explores historical transformations of medical theories of exhaustion by investigating the functions exhaustion fulfills as a core symptom in various other diagnoses, including burn-out, CFS, depression, neurasthenia and melancholia.

Amount: £3,715
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Kent

'Made Up People': An Interdisciplinary Approach to Labelling and the Construction of People in Post-War History. 22 Apr 2013

I am seeking funding for a one-day conference to be held at the University of Warwick in October 2013. The aim of this conference is to situate labelling theory, as conceptualised by philosopher of science Ian Hacking, in his work on 'Making Up People' (1986). The conference will focus on the significance of this theoretical model for history of medicine in the post-war era. Hacking has agreed to speak but would need to be flown over from Canada. The funding will make this possible. A number of other speakers have also been secured. The conference will be interdisciplinary in orientation.

Amount: £2,525
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Warwick

Medical Law Across Boundaries at the End of Life (MED-LABEL). 25 Mar 2013

Medical Law Across Boundaries at the End of Life (MED-LABEL) examines emergent ethico-legal dilemmas in end-of-life care, across geographical and disciplinary boundaries. The project primarily encompasses seven proposed publications, which collectively explore: the relief of symptoms in terminally ill patients; advance decision-making and the withdrawal of life-supporting treatments; and the relationship between bioethics and the law. The papers adopt multidisciplinary perspectives, combining do minant themes in law, bioethics and medical science, whilst also looking to developments in other jurisdictions. In particular, the papers seek to engage with expert opinion in palliative medicine and neuroscience, whilst addressing complaints that law is losing touch with its ethical foundations. These are timely concerns, on which I have extensive notes and detailed plans for publications, for which I now seek Trust support in order to ensure their successful completion. In keeping with the mu lti-disciplinary and comparative ethos of the project, an award would support visits to meet with scholars and collaborators in the UK, Germany and USA, as well as some research assistance and teaching cover. MED-LABEL will provide the groundwork for a future application for an Investigator award, expanding my work on bioethics, law and end-of-life care.

Amount: £4,997
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Bristol

Conference Support for: Therapy and Empowerment - Coercion and Punishment Contemporary and Historical Perspectives on Work and Occupational Therapy . 11 Feb 2013

Part-funding is sought for a conference on the history of labour and occupational therapy (OT), to be held at St Anne's College, Oxford, in June 2013. This is the first academic event in the UK that deals with this topic. Historians of medicine and academics from the OT and related fields will contribute papers on historical and contemporary aspects during the two-day event. Scholars from Japan, South America, the USA, Germany, Austria and the UK will present their research. An exhibition featur ing some of the holdings of the Dorset House (the first OT college in UK) will be organised by the Brookes librarian during June; this will be open to delegates and the public. Academic dissemination is planned (edited book, audio podcasts). The scholarly activities will provide the framework for follow-on outreach activities organised together with the College of OT, the OT programme at Brookes, and postgraduate research sponsored by the Casson Trust.

Amount: £3,870
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Oxford Brookes University

Thematic analysis of policy advice on NHS reform from 1982 to 2012. 11 Feb 2013

(a) research question to be addressed, What role has evidence from think tanks played in shaping the current market-based reforms of the NHS? (b) aims of the project To collate and evaluate documents produced by think-tanks proposing major market-based reforms to the NHS since 1980; to identify the key themes and to trace the evolution of ideas within them and ultimately to the design of the 2012 Health and Social Care Act (HASCA); and to evaluate the quality (internal and external v alidity) of the recommendations that were made. This will be a health policy analysis of a historical data set rather than a historical study. Several historians have been kind enough to discuss the content of this study: Professor Virginia Berridge concerning the historical context, and Dr Martin Gorsky and Dr Sally Sheard on financing and the changes in decision-making on health policy over the last two decades,

Symposium on 'Reassessing Psychiatric Experiments and Coerced Research under National Socialism, 1933-1945: New Findings, Interpretations and Bioethical Problems'. 18 Jan 2013

Nazi Human experiments are iconic as among the worst atrocities of the Holocaust, and constitute a reference point in modern bioethics. A new scholarship is emerging, based on hitherto unavailable sources and the reappraisal of canonical interpretations. By looking at psychiatric experiments in clinical contexts, and research on bodies of executed euthanasia victims, a range of problematic fields are opening up. This symposium is thus timely. It aims to engage with problematic aspects of coe rced research that are unevenly documented. Among the issues to be addressed are: the rationales for research on psychiatric patients, victim responses and narratives; pharmacological testing; and brain anatomical research and the supply of body parts. It is important to evaluate major locations and victim groups in the light of new findings and testimonies. The symposium will also be an opportunity to consider ethical and methodological issues associated with conducting the historical research such as naming victims, defining the parameters of criminal experiments and the appropriate terminology and concepts. The sessions will take the form of exploratory papers and round table discussions.

Amount: £4,996
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Oxford Brookes University

Medicine and Philosophy in the Islamic World. 18 Jan 2013

A two-day conference to be held at the Warburg Institute, March 1-2, 2013, entitled Medicine and Philosophy in the Islamic World and jointly organized by Peter E. Pormann and Peter Adamson. The conference will feature contributions by an international group of speakers with expertise on both the history of medicine and history of philosophy. These contributions will later appear as a volume of proceedings, to be published by the Warburg Institute. It will be the first book to look generally at t he intimate connection between philosophy and medicine in authors who wrote in Arabic in the medieval and early modern periods.

Amount: £4,921
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Manchester