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Recipients:
The Royal British Legion
University of Leeds
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Results

Determinants of effectiveness of a novel community health workers programme inimproving maternal and child health in Nigeria. 28 Oct 2014

The AIM of this project is to inform strengthening and scaling up of community health worker (CHW) programmes. This will be done by investigating two implementations (with and without conditional cash transfers) of a Nigerian CHW programme, to understand what factors, under what conditions, promote equitable access to quality services, and improve maternal and child health outcomes. We will: 1. Understand of the context and the process of implementation of the interventions; 2. Identify, assess and compare the intervention outputs and outcomes; 3. Develop a model of complex relations between the actors, context, implementation process, outputs and outcomes of the interventions; 4. Develop transferable best practices for scalability and generalizability of the interventions. This five-year study will be implemented in two States in Nigeria - Niger State in the North and Anambra State in the South, identified in consultation with the Federal MOH and SUREP national programme officer. The project is designed as a multidisciplinary and mixed methods study, using qualitative and quantitative methods. Realist evaluation will be an overall platform for the study, which will use economic evaluation, social sciences and statistical analysis. Qualitative data will be collected using in-depth interviews with facility managers, community health workers, PHC staff; facility exit interviews and focus group discussions with service users and their families. Quantitative data will include existing data from HMIS and SURE-P programme and structured facility exit survey with pregnant women. Analysis of quantitative and qualitative datasets will be integrated, to allow in-depth exploration of emerging issues and continuous triangulation of findings. Project results will be disseminated widely through development of policy briefs, presentations at management meetings, newsletters and press-releases, to ensure their uptake in policy and practice in Nigeria and wider.

Amount: £264,983
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds

Modern Cryo-Electron Microscopy with Direct Electron Detection at the University of Leeds. 11 Jun 2015

Funding is requested to buy a modern, cryo-capable, electron microscope to replace an outdated instrument at the end of its useful life. Data collection is currently slow and inefficient, and we cannot achieve the resolution that modern instruments allow. The new microscope will be more stable, automated, and equipped with a direct detector of the kind that is revolutionizing EM. We will also purchase the infrastructure to handle the enormous data flows that we will generate. This will transform electron microscopy in the Astbury Centre and support a wide range of biomedical projects in areas such as infection, degeneration and cancer. For 1M of Trust funds, and University investment of 1.7M, the new microscope will enable cutting-edge biological EM, including: 1) Pushing the structure determination of biological macromolecules (and their complexes) to the highest possible resolution, which in many cases will be close to atomic resolution (3-5 ). 2) Allowing us for the first time t o solve the structures of smaller macromolecules and complexes (>200-300 KDa) 3) Determining the structures of relatively lowly populated functional states in heterogeneous and/or dynamic systems 4) Performing tomography studies of unique biological events such as the entry of a virus into its host cell.

Amount: £1,000,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds

Open access award 2015/16. 21 Sep 2015

Not available

Amount: £51,335
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds

Development of small molecule inhibitors of Ebola virus genome replication 25 Aug 2015

Development of small molecule inhibitors of Ebola virus genome replicationThis Pathfinder project will address infection with Ebola virus (EBOV), which has a human mortality rate of over 50%. EBOV is a member of the Filoviridae family (genus Ebolavirus), a negative strand RNA virus that is highly transmissible and causes severe haemorrhagic fever. The recent outbreak of EBOV in West Africa has highlighted the lack of effective therapeutic options for the treatment of this infection. Efficacious small molecule inhibitors of the virus are therefore needed for the rapid treatment of EBOV infected individuals, but their development has been hampered by the requirement to propagate EBOV under Biological Safety Level 4 (BSL4) containment.The project team, led by Professor Mark Harris at University of Leeds, propose to use a combination of in silico drug design and a mini-genome system, which accurately and faithfully recapitulates the essential processes of EBOV gene transcription and genome replication under BSL2 conditions. The team will design small molecule inhibitors based on known high-resolution structures of EBOV proteins involved in these processes, in particular focussing on the essential nucleocapsid protein. This approach builds on existing strengths at the University of Leeds, combining an innovative approach to in silico drug design with extensive experience in both virology and structural biology. The project aims to deliver drug-like lead compounds that can be further developed into therapeutic agents.

Amount: £204,959
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds
Amount: £150,473
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds
Amount: £150,473
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds

Leeds, Structural Biology. 22 Jun 2015

Not available

Amount: £150,473
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds
Amount: £150,473
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds
Amount: £150,473
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds

Using Cholera toxin B-chain as a system for the targeted delivery of proteins to motor neurons 30 Jan 2015

The aims of the project are to design a method for the reversible binding of antibody-like proteins to Cholera Toxin B subunit (CTB) to facilitate their trafficking into cells. Initially, a screen against CTB will be carried out toidentify suitable Adhirons. These will be conjugated to a range of different proteins, before being combined with CTB, and administered to assess its ability to deliver the complex into motor neurons in vivo. There is currently no method to deliver antibody-like molecules into motor neurons selectively. Sublingual injection of CTB allows this group of neurons to be targeted specifically. This project therefore focuses on the design of an enabling technology to permit delivery of proteins into specific cell typesto address questions in neurobiology. By combining techniques from molecular biology and chemistry to generate the binding complex, and assessing the effect of these complexes on the nervous system in vivo, this project will provide an interdisciplinary approach to understanding neuronal function at the molecular level. Therefore, this project addresses one of the Wellcome Trusts five major research challenges, i.e., understanding the brain.

Amount: £6,401
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds

Support for a Wellcome Trust/Academy of Medical Sciences Internship 22 Jun 2015

A large number of human diseases are associated with the deposition of amyloid-like aggregates. As amyloid species associated with different diseasesshare structural properties, it is hypothesised a generic mechanism of cytotoxicity may be the underlying cause for many different diseases pathology. The projects key goals are; 1) Elucidate structural information on amyloid fibril ends Ends of fibrils have been shown to interact with synthetic membranes, and so elucidating the structure of fibril ends may provide insights into mechanism of interaction, which may be a pathway of fibril cytotoxicity. 2) Analyse how amyloid fibrils interact with membrane fractions of cells As fibrils have been shown to interact with synthetic membranes, we seek to analyse how they interact with membranes extracted from the cell such as lysosomal membranes. 3) Assess the structure of amyloid in the cellular environment and characterise the cell's response. We aim to image both fibrils and oligomers inside whole cells using high resolution imaging techniques including cryo-electron tomography, in order to characterise how the cell responds to amyloid exposure. These goals will help to elucidate underlying mechanisms of amyloid cytotoxicity, providing insights into the pathology of diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and haemodialysis related amyloidosis.

Amount: £5,825
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds

Engineering Solutions for an Ageing Population with Musculoskeletal & Cardiovascular Disease. 50 more years after 50. 20 Jul 2015

The   ageing population is increasing in number and life expectancy. The population   expects fifty more years after fifty with high levels of activity and quality   of life. However, the musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems age and   degenerate, adversely affecting mobility, ability to work and quality of   life. Advances in engineering and bioscience have created opportunities for   novel devices and regenerative therapies, which utilise innovative   biomaterials or biological scaffolds to guide the patient's own stem cells to   repair degenerative tissues. Advances in patient imaging and diagnostics are   enabling earlier disease diagnosis with opportunities to intervene earlier in   the degenerative process and preserve healthy tissue, and potential to   provide patient specific continuum of care. WELMEC will deliver: - Longer   lasting joint replacements in the hip, knee and spine. - Novel regenerative   biological scaffolds for degenerative joint tissues, dental reconstructions   and cardiovascular surgery. - Advances in cell therapies using the patient's   stem cells. - Advanced medical imaging to facilitate earlier diagnosis and   intervention. - Novel protein biosensors for disease diagnosis and improved   patient targeting. WELMEC will integrate over 200 engineering, physical   science, life science and medical researchers with clinicians and   industrialists to develop and deliver innovative therapies and patient   services for the ageing population.

Amount: £53,333
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds

Public Engagement Provision. 25 Nov 2014

Not available

Amount: £4,973
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds
Amount: £125,021
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds
Amount: £148,505
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds

Suicide Voices: Narratives of Trauma in the Globalised Workplace. 17 Sep 2015

This project examines the 'epidemic' of suicides within the globalised workplace during the 2000s and asks why work or conditions of work can push some individuals to take their own lives. It aims to bring a critical humanities perspective based on a close reading of suicide testimonies in their social, cultural and economic contexts, to bear on emerging public health research on the rise of economic suicides internationally. The project investigates what suicidal individuals' own testimonies ca n tell us about the social conditions that motivate self-killing in work and therefore provides a critical alternative to current epidemiological approaches to suicide in public health. Building on an emerging collaboration between humanities and public health researchers in the UK and France, the project breaks new ground in its interdisciplinary, methodological and international scope. It has three main goals: 1. To create a new interdisciplinary and transnational research network that expand s and deepens our understanding of the workplace suicide crisis internationally. 2. To publish two peer-reviewed articles that draw on the projects findings and target both English and French-speaking academic audiences. 3. To develop a joint funding application (with Prof Martin McKee) for the Wellcome Trust's Senior Investigator Awards.

Amount: £46,548
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds

Pasts, Presents and Futures of Medical Regeneration. 08 Apr 2015

How can medical humanities change how we think about, carry out, respond to and discuss medical regeneration? In a modern context, regenerative medicine is a major sub-field of biomedical research, described by the Mayo Clinic as a 'game-changing area of medicine with the potential to fully heal damaged tissues and organs'. Based on techniques as diverse as stem cell therapy and biomedical engineering, this branch of translational research has the potential to address challenges raised by ageing populations, stretched supplies of donor organs and chronic diseases. This project will bring together researchers from across the medical humanities and biomedical sciences to examine what we can learn from past ideas and practices of medical regeneration, and how this might inform the social, cultural and clinical dimensions of regenerative medicine in the future. The project has three major goals: 1. To establish a new interdisciplinary research network in medical regeneration. 2. To produce two peer-reviewed articles examining how insights and methodologies from the medical humanities can enhance our understanding and practice of regeneration in medicine. 3. To identify and refine core research areas and questions which will underpin major grant applications, including a Wellcome Investigator Award and Wellcome Collaborative Award.

Amount: £40,044
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds

Genetics and Biocolonialism in Contemporary Literature and Film. 23 Jul 2015

This project will explore the representation in global literature and film of genetic research on vulnerable and isolated populations. This research has gained significant media attention - from the Human Genome Diversity Project to the HeLa controversy - and has led to medical science and the pharmaceutical industry being framed as agents of 'biocolonialism', a term highlighting the power dynamics involved when minority groups are 'mined' for their genetic riches. The research programme will us e postcolonial critical methodologies to investigate how creative depictions of genetics can help us understand the cultural politics of biomedical research, focusing especially on work by indigenous, postcolonial, and minority writers. It starts from the premise that the creative arts, and modes of critique drawn from literary and cultural studies, can be transformative in facilitating cross-cultural understanding, dialogue, and knowledge exchange regarding genetic science. Concepts like intell ectual property are often incompatible with non-western worldviews, and produce conflicts over how human life is valued in the genomic era. The researchers will explore how imaginative texts portray such tensions, and evaluate their implications for debates taking place within bioethics, health policy, and international law. Key goals of the programme extend from producing high-quality academic outputs to using creative works to engage the public with cross-cultural experiences of genetic resear ch. Its overarching aims are to advance the globalisation of the medical humanities by promoting postcolonial approaches to biomedicine, and to aid the Wellcome Trust in developing ethical frameworks that empower global communities in their engagements with genetic research.

Amount: £109,220
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds

Exploring the links between metallic cardiovascular device degradation and local biological functionality . 30 Apr 2015

Stents are commonly used for the treatment of occlusive atherosclerotic diseases (OAD). In-stent restenosis (ISR) has been seen to occur at a ratio as high as 2030% 6-months after the implantation. This can have devastating effects including mortality. Braided stents or stents in an overlapped configuration are commonly used to bridge atherosclerotic legions. However by doing so interfaces susceptible to tribocorrosion (formation of metal-ions and nano-particles) are introduced. Whilst it is hyp othesised that metal-ion release affects local principal resident cells of the blood vessel walls resulting in adverse remodelling, the mechanisms for this are still unclear. The influence of nano-particles has never been considered. This project aims to investigate the role of NiTi/CoCr alloy degradation on the adverse remodelling of vasculature. Through the use of novel fretting-corrosion, organ culture and bio-reactor methodologies, the role of metallic debris on the local biological reacti ons and subsequent toxicity of debris will be determined. This combination of attributes provides a step beyond the current state-of-the-art by elucidating the role of metal degradation and the mechanisms pertaining to inflammation and in-stent restenosis. Through a combination of novel methodologies developed by the applicants a research activity with direct clinical and industrial will be established.

Amount: £99,969
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds

Monastic Sciences: Medicina, Mechanica, Philosophia. 31 Mar 2015

Monastic Sciences: Medicina, Mechanica, Philosophia is a conference that re-considers the contribution of medieval monks to medicine, science and technology. It explores new approaches to the theoretical development and practical application of biomedical and technical knowledge within and beyond religious communities. Of particular interest is the contribution made by medieval monks to the wider diffusion of medical and scientific knowledge. How and in what circumstances was biomedical and tech nical knowledge applied beyond the boundaries of the religious precinct? How exclusive was such knowledge was thought to be? How did it compare to lay scientific understanding of the period? This event will be held over two days at the University of Leeds, with contributions welcomed from postgraduates and early-career researchers of all disciplines. The two keynote speakers are Peregrine Horden (Royal Holloway) and Sophie Page (UCL), both of whom have a strong track record in the study of medi cine and natural philosophy in and beyond the cloister. The conference is the third in a successful series on monasticism organized by postgraduate students in the Institute for Medieval Studies at Leeds. This is the first time that medicine and natural philosophy have featured as the theme of the conference.

Amount: £800
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds