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Results

Learn to Ski 30 Jul 2009

Funding under Sport England's Small Grants funding programme for a Revenue project titled 'Learn to Ski'. This project lists its main activity as Skiing.

Amount: £3,482
Funder: Sport England
Recipient: Paladins Explorer Scout Unit Skelmers...
Region: North West
District: Sefton District

Creoda Arrows 26 Feb 2015

Funding under Sport England's Small Grants funding programme for a Revenue project titled 'Creoda Arrows'. This project lists its main activity as Archery.

Amount: £1,639
Funder: Sport England
Recipient: 1st Crudwell Cub Scout Group
Region: South West
District: Wiltshire

RS Feva drop Off 20 Aug 2015

Funding under Sport England's Small Grants funding programme for a Revenue project titled 'RS Feva drop Off'. This project is a Sailing & Yachting project, with a focus on younger beneficiaries.

Amount: £10,000
Funder: Sport England
Recipient: Derbyshire Scouts Sailing Club
Region: East Midlands
District: Amber Valley District

Purchase of Air Rifles 25 May 2016

Funding under Sport England's Small Grants funding programme for a Revenue project titled 'Purchase of Air Rifles'. This project lists its main activity as Shooting.

Amount: £330
Funder: Sport England
Recipient: 2nd Crawcrook Scouts
Region: North East
District: Gateshead District

Purchase 6 single handed racing dinghies - scouts aged 14-16 02 Oct 2013

Funding under Sport England's Small Grants funding programme for a Revenue project titled 'Purchase 6 single handed racing dinghies - scouts aged 14-16'. This project is a Sailing & Yachting project, with a focus on younger beneficiaries.

Amount: £10,000
Funder: Sport England
Recipient: River Teign Sea Scouts 1st Shaldon
Region: South West
District: Teignbridge District

Intermediate Sail Training Equipment 27 Jul 2010

Funding under Sport England's Small Grants funding programme for a Revenue project titled 'Intermediate Sail Training Equipment'. This project lists its main activity as Sailing & Yachting.

Amount: £10,000
Funder: Sport England
Recipient: River Teign Sea Scouts 1st Shaldon
Region: South West
District: Teignbridge District

Derby Scouts Sailing - Increase Participation 08 Mar 2011

Funding under Sport England's Small Grants funding programme for a Revenue project titled 'Derby Scouts Sailing - Increase Participation'. This project lists its main activity as Sailing & Yachting.

Amount: £9,999
Funder: Sport England
Recipient: Derby Area Scout Sailing Club
Region: East Midlands
District: Amber Valley District

Cellular Dynamics and Regulatory Networks Controlling Endometrial Remodelling during the Window of Implantation 17 Jul 2018

The endometrium undergoes iterative cycles of menstrual shedding, regeneration, rapid growth, and differentiation in response to ovarian hormones. During the mid-luteal phase, the endometrium becomes transiently receptive to implantation, heralding the start of a process of intense tissue remodelling, characterized by secretory transformation of glandular epithelium, angiogenesis, differentiation of stromal cells into secretory decidual cells, and activation of specialized immune cells. Several reproductive disorders, including recurrent pregnancy loss, are linked to defects in tissue remodelling at implantation. However, the cellular complexity and dynamic nature of the endometrium have so far precluded precise characterization of the underlying pathological mechanisms and drivers. We will employ high-throughput single-nucleus sequencing to map the dynamic changes in gene expression and chromatin accessibility (cis-regulatory regions) in all endometrial cell types across the luteal phase in defined patient groups. The data will be back-mapped to a future successful pregnancy or miscarriage. This analysis will yield unparalleled insight into the sequence of endometrial events (i.e. changes in cell populations, cellular states, gene expression and transcriptional regulation) leading to a successful or failed pregnancy. Further, 3D organoid cultures, consisting of glands and stroma, will be used to investigate putative drivers of endometrial dysfunction and to evaluate new treatment targets.

Amount: £1,281,629
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Warwick

Structure and mechanism of a key bacterial cell division protein 06 Sep 2018

To divide and multiply, bacteria must remodel their cell envelope to facilitate physical separation of daughter cells. FtsEX is a key player in coordinating cell division events on either side of the bacterial inner membrane. FtsEX belongs to the same protein superfamily as the MacB efflux pump and the LolCDE lipoprotein trafficking complex, collectively termed Type VII ABC transporters. Current models for FtsEX activity suggest long range conformational changes in FtsEX regulate periplasmic enzymes responsible for peptidoglycan hydrolysis while maintaining cytoplasmic interaction with the septal Z-ring. Structural and functional data are essential to understand how FtsEX works and to assess viability of inhibition using chemical compounds. This project seeks to characterise the interaction of FtsEX with its binding partners, the role of ATP binding and hydrolysis, and to obtain structural data using X-ray crystallography. The project builds on published work on Type VII ABC transporters and is supported by preliminary data showing FtsEX has been crystallised. The Seed Award will presage future applications to the Wellcome Trust, MRC or Leverhulme Trust to further explore the structure and function of bacterial cell division proteins as targets for future antibiotic development.

Amount: £98,945
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Warwick

Transformations: Encountering Gender and Science 16 Jun 2018

The Rethinking Sexology team’s historical research has uncovered important material on the relationship between medical authority and ‘patient’ experience and the development of diagnostic categories/treatment protocols. We propose a public engagement programme that invites young trans people (age 16-25) to explore this material, co-conduct new research, including an oral history project, and develop an ambitious programme of creative responses leading to a performance and exhibition in four relevant high-profile venues across the UK. The plan of action has been developed during an extensive consultation period with key stakeholders, in which ideas and methodologies have been fully tested. The programme is led by the Rethinking Sexology (RS) team who has an outstanding track record in field-leading engaged research and public engagement. The team’s experience will be complimented by collaborating with a uniquely qualified group of writers, performers and youth-facilitators, known for their pioneering and award-winning work with the trans community, with whom the RS team already has long-standing collaborative relationships. The programme will deliver a set of exceptionally innovative activities that will empower young people to: contribute to and enhance health and humanities research and public engagement practices; investigate clinical and diagnostic protocols and transform clinical dialogue; shape public debate through high-quality creative outputs (exhibition/performance) that promise to be intellectually, artistically and emotionally powerful and stimulating. The co-production model at the heart of the programme will feed systematically and continually into ongoing research activities, enabling the project to stand as a beacon of good practice in engaged research and public engagement.

Amount: £147,315
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

Connexin 32 evolution to a CO2 sensor 31 May 2018

Connexin26 (Cx26) is the CO2 chemosensor from reptiles to humans. The CO2 sensitivity of Cx26 arose early in the evolution of air breathing and is present in the ancient lungfish ancestor of all tetrapods. However, Cx26 of modern ray-finned fish has lost the CO2-binding motif. In mammals, Cx32 has a CO2 binding motif almost identical to that of Cx26 and is also sensitive to CO2. Strikingly the CO2 binding motif is retained in Cx32 of ray-finned fish. I would like to test the hypothesis that Cx26 and Cx32 have evolved from a common ancestor. An important step in testing this hypothesis is to see whether Cx32 of different ray-finned fish species is sensitive to CO2 and compare the protein sequence similarity. I will transfect fish Cx32 cDNA into HeLa cells and use a simple dye loading assay to test their CO2-sensitivity. I will also quantify the CO2 sensitivity of human Cx32 to give a direct comparison between fish and human Cx32. I will conduct a bioinformatic analysis of Cx32, paying particular attention to the CO2-binding motif, from several fish, amphibian, reptilian and mammalian species. My work will shed new light on the origins of CO2 binding in the connexin family.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Warwick

Diabetic Vascular Disease (DVD): Enhancing our understanding of the cause of DVD 31 May 2018

The two main forms of diabetes are type I and type II diabetes; type I is an autoimmune disease where the insulin producing beta cells are destroyed by the body’s own immune system, and as a result the body cannot produce insulin. Type II, the most common form of the disease accounts for 90-95% of all diabetes. Both types lead to hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance. These causes overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and via endothelial dysfunction and inflammation, this accumulation of ROS plays a major role in precipitating diabetes vascular diseases (DVD) in these patients. If DVD is not treated the blood vessels will continue to narrow and will eventually become occluded by the deposits of fat. This will lead to ischaemia in the organ which can be fatal if this occurs in the brain or heart. Our overall aim is to better understand DVD at a molecular level and how it is actually caused, and this will be achieved by studying endothelial cells and exposing them to DVD inducing factors and see how they change.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Warwick

Macromolecular Mechanisms of Microsporidia Infection Investigated by Cryo Electron Tomography 21 May 2018

Microsporidia are eukaryotic, intracellular parasites that infect most animals, including humans. They cause debilitating disease in immunocompromised individuals and are partly responsible for the global decline in honeybee populations. To infect a host cell, microsporidia employ a harpoon-like apparatus called polar tube (PT) that rapidly ejects from the spore, penetrates the membrane of a target tissue cell and transports the spore content (sporoplasm) into it. I propose to investigate the so-far unknown macromolecular architecture and mechanism of the PT using state-of-the-art cryo electron tomography (cryoET). The key goal is to examine the cellular machinery that facilitates PT release, sporoplasm transfer and target membrane penetration. This research will provide 3D molecular maps of the PT in action and thus detailed and dynamic understanding of the microsporidian infection pathway. The research will enrich our knowledge of fundamental cell biology, establish microsporidia as a eukaryotic model system for cryoET, inform new medical approaches to treat microsporidiosis and help fight the decline in honeybee populations. Seed Award funding will pave the way for my career as new independent group leader in the UK, with a high impact biomedical profile and will offer a plethora of opportunities to collaborate with academia and industry downstream.

Amount: £98,680
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

Probing the chromatin assembly pathway 18 Oct 2017

Histone deposition to form nucleosomes is an important process underlying all genomic transactions. Research over the last 20 years has put forward the idea of a dedicated histone chaperoning pathway in which histones are transferred between a number of distinct chaperoning complexes that guide their thermodynamic assembly into nucleosomes. This has been difficult to test directly with the currently available toolset for pulse labeling of proteins. Furthermore, mixing of soluble nuclear proteins with cytosolic extracts upon cellular fractionation has complicated defining the nucleo-cytoplasmic division within the pathway, at least through biochemical means. I have recently developed a new approach for pulse-chase labeling of nuclear proteins using a cytosolic tether-and-release strategy that offers some advantages in studying the early stages of the histone chaperoning pathway, which I plan to capitalize on. I also aim to understand in greater detail at the molecular level the interplay between two chaperoning proteins that have been shown to be important in H3-H4 heterodimer formation. My key goals are to (1) investigate the early stages of histone processing, (2) investigate the molecular basis of interaction between sNASP and the H3-H4-ASF1 complex and (3) further develop tether-and-release approaches to investigate fast kinetics of nuclear proteins.

Amount: £921,866
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Warwick

The development of insulin resistance and anabolic resistance during muscle disuse: what is the role of fuel integration? 08 Nov 2017

Skeletal muscle atrophy, which occurs during short-term disuse, is thought to be due to the development of anabolic resistance of protein metabolism and insulin resistance of glucose metabolism, although their cause is currently unknown. The primary research aim of this fellowship is to establish the role of muscle fuel availability and integration in disuse-induced insulin and anabolic resistance. In collaboration with the Medical School, I will perform two randomized, placebo-controlled studies in which young, healthy participants undergo 2 days of forearm immobilisation with placebo, Acipimox (to decrease plasma lipid availability), Formoterol (to stimulate glycolytic flux), or dietary branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) manipulation, to alter substrate availability. I will combine the arteriovenous-venous forearm balance technique, that I have recently established in Exeter, with stable isotope amino acid infusion and repeated forearm muscle biopsies to quantify muscle glucose, fatty acid, and BCAA balance, oxidation, and intermediary metabolism (including muscle protein synthesis), both fasted and during a hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic-hyperaminoacidaemic clamp. Two periods of research at the University of Texas Medical Branch will enable me to develop skills in mass spectrometry tracer analyses and develop a network of collaborators in the USA, both crucial for my future career investigating disuse-induced muscle atrophy.

Amount: £250,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

Shedding light on platinum chemotherapy: a new mechanistic approach 08 Nov 2017

Despite their widespread clinical use in cancer treatment, platinum(II) complexes, including cisplatin, present critical issues such as severe side effects and onset of resistance. Furthermore, their mechanism of action is not fully understood and no reliable patient stratification tool exists. Novel prodrugs based on photoactivatable platinum(IV) complexes are reduced to cytotoxic platinum(II) species upon irradiation with visible light, providing spatial control of their cytotoxicity. Photoactivated complexes are active in cisplatin-resistant cell lines suggesting a different mechanism of action. I will investigate the mechanism of action of platinum-based anticancer drugs on- and off-target, with focus on photoactivatable complexes and clinically established drugs. The cellular targets will be identified by functional genetics experiments (RNAi/CRISPR-Cas9 screening) and the fate of platinum in vivo will be evaluated by SPECT imaging with platinum-195m labelled complexes in mouse xenograft cancer models (Goal 1). The positron-emitting isotope copper-64 will also be used to evaluate copper-transporter Ctr1 as a biomarker to predict response to platinum-based chemotherapy (Goal 2). Based on these findings, I will modify photoactivatable platinum(IV) complexes (i) to reduce their off-target toxicity by attachment to antibodies targeting specific cancer-cells receptors and (ii) to enhance cytotoxic effect upon photoactivation, by attachment to light-harvesting chromophores (Goal 3).

Amount: £250,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Warwick

Neurobiological mechanisms of emotional relief in adolescents with a history of sexual abuse 06 Dec 2017

Adolescents who experienced childhood sexual abuse (CSA) engage in non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) more frequently than peers exposed to other forms of abuse or no abuse. NSSI serves an important function of relief from acute negative affect. Despite providing temporary relief from distress, NSSI is also linked to higher rates of suicide and hospitalisations and the effectiveness of current clinical interventions is limited. This may be attributed to a lack of understanding the neurobiological and behavioural mechanisms that underlie NSSI as a relief function in particular in youth who experienced CSA. To address this gap, the study aims (1) to model brain activity during distress and emotional relief (i.e., NSSI) in adolescents with and without a history of CSA using functional magnetic resonance imaging and (2) to examine if adolescents with CSA select actions to 'escape' an aversive context more quickly and often compared to non-abused peers. The ultimate goal of this translational research is to understand the neurobiological and behavioural mechanisms that confer vulnerability to NSSI following CSA (Stage 1) in order to develop effective intervention and prevention strategies to keep vulnerable teenagers safe (Stage 2) . Keywords: sexual abuse, non-suicidal self-harm, relief, functional magnetic resonance imaging, translational research

Amount: £230,048
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

Open Access Awards 2017/18 30 Sep 2018

Not available

Amount: £58,344
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

Open Access Award 2017/18 30 Sep 2018

Not available

Amount: £42,025
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Warwick
Amount: £4,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Warwick