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Your search ‘’ returned 10,172 results in ‘All grant fields’

Search results (Displaying 10,172 grants)

Total grants
10,172
Total funders
1
Total recipients
1,457
Earliest award date
17 Oct 2005
Latest award date
30 Sep 2020
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Vacation Scholarships 2019 - University of Edinburgh
<p>Vacation Scholarships 2019 - University of Edinburgh</p>
Amount: £17,992
Health Emergencies: Evidence Brief for Policy
<p>An evidence brief for policy would be developed for country teams/Emergency Division working in concert with EVIPNet.</p> <p>Following identification of health priority issues, the project would:&nbsp;</p> <p>* develop searchable research questions and search strategies. Evidence will be retrieved, mapped and appraised for quality, and examined for local applicability. In this way the project will be fully relevant to local contexts and support the WHO values capacity building and empowerment.</p> <p>* deliver a summary of packaged, relevant information i.e. an evidence brief for policy, to frame the policy priority issues, outline the evidence and the important governance, financial and delivery considerations.&nbsp;</p> <p>* convene a deliberative dialogue for a fully collaborative process.&nbsp;</p> <p>* support policy choice and implementation.&nbsp;</p> <p>* allow for monitoring and evaluation.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>
Amount: £17,749
Nature Photograms in the Anthropocene
<p style="margin-left: 0cm; margin-right: 0cm">This project considers the photographic practice of three contemporary artists who produce photograms, intimate close-ups of the natural world, asking: how do these artists portray humanity&rsquo;s relationship with and responsibility for nature in the age of the Anthropocene? I will be working with a selection of material from the V&amp;A Photography Collection to investigate the contemporary resonances of (and historical references to) the Victorian cyanotype photograms of Anna Atkins&rsquo;, who pioneered nature photography in 1854. In particular, I will be looking at photograms produced by Barbara Baran (1956&ndash;) and Zafer Baran (1955&ndash;), Elaine Duigenan (1964&ndash;), and well-known photographer Garry Fabian Miller (1957&ndash;), as well as Anna Atkins&rsquo; cyanotypes. I will draw on the V&amp;A&rsquo;s previous exhibition &ldquo;Shadow Catchers: Camera-less Photography&rdquo; (13 October 2010 to 20 February 2011) and its associated publication <em>Shadow Catchers: Camera-less Photography</em> (2010), curated and written by Martin Barnes, Senior Curator of Photographs at the V&amp;A. This project will look particularly at the ways in which contemporary artists utilise photogram technology to highlight an intimacy and proximity between humans and the natural world, and how this emphasis on intimacy and proximity poses a call to greater responsibility for the natural world.</p>
Amount: £28,796
Improving clinical handovers and communication to improve continuity of care for hospitalized small and sick newborns in selected public hospitals in Kenya.
<p style="margin-left: 0in; margin-right: 0in">Clinical handovers involve transferring patient responsibility and accountability between outgoing and incoming healthcare providers across shifts and disciplines. It has been highlighted as the most vulnerable time in patient care. Communication failures during handovers have been linked to adverse events, jeopardizing patient safety. Many techniques have been used to improve handovers and communication in health care settings in High Income Countries (HICs) often focused on standardizing information transfer. The SBAR (Situation, Background, Assessment and Recommendation) structured handover approach is often regarded as a &lsquo;best practice&rsquo; technique in critical care that has led to reductions of medical errors and enhanced safety culture. In LMICs, including Kenya interventions to improve handovers have not been implemented. In this study, focusing on neonatal ward care I propose: i) to systematically review tools used to improve and evaluate effects of handover interventions, ii) explore current Kenyan nurses&rsquo; handover practices and develop with them a contextually appropriate tool to improve and standardize handovers and, iii) to conduct a pilot implementation study using mixed methods (focus group discussions and a survey) to assess its potential effectiveness. This fellowship will then provide the preliminary evidence needed to inform the design future funding proposals for larger implementation studies.</p>
Amount: £120,000
Using economic modelling to determine the optimal package of services against non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in South Africa
<p style="margin-left: 0cm; margin-right: 0cm">The goal of this study is to use economic analysis and disease modelling to determine the economic impact of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in South Africa and to establish how to optimally allocate public-sector resources across NCD interventions.</p> <p style="margin-left: 0cm; margin-right: 0cm">Under this project I will construct a multi-disease health state transition model and use it to establish healthcare costs of and needs for different interventions (including preventative measures for distal risk factors such as smoking and alcohol intake) and packages of interventions targeted at the prevention, early detection and management of NCDs at baseline and over the next 20 years. Ingredients-based costing and micro-costing will be used to augment available data on intervention costs. Using an established epidemiological model parameterised to South Africa based on large surveys and routine data, I will then establish the incremental cost-effectiveness of individual interventions and intervention packages, allowing for downstream health benefits. Finally, I will test different combinations of interventions to identify the optimal package and service delivery platforms that will result in the most cost-effective programme to reach the country&rsquo;s NCD policy goal, a reduction of premature mortality due to NCDs by 25%, under both the current budget and a budget increased by up to 50%.</p>
Amount: £120,000
The cost effectiveness and impact of an optimised TB diagnosis intervention on incidence, prevalence and mortality due to TB in Malawi.
<p style="margin-left: 0in; margin-right: 0in">Early diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) reduces transmission thus impacting TB incidence and prevalence. Research undertaken in developing countries shows that current TB diagnosis algorithms act as a barrier to poorer people seeking TB diagnosis and treatment. Patients accessing these services may incur catastrophic costs therefore hindering the achievement of WHO&rsquo;s target of 0% incidence of catastrophic costs due to TB. This has led to concerted efforts to develop interventions that simplify TB diagnosis and treatment pathways. In Blantyre, Malawi, one such intervention based on computer-aided x-ray diagnosis (TB-CAD) is currently being investigated in the PROSPECT study, a randomised controlled trial.</p> <p style="margin-left: 0in; margin-right: 0in">My research will investigate the public health benefits and cost-effectiveness, &ndash; from the health provider and societal perspective &ndash; of TB-CAD. By fitting statistical models using the PROSPECT study&rsquo;s trial data, I will estimate the long-term impact on TB prevalence, incidence and mortality in Malawi, assuming that TB-CAD were to be scaled-up at country-level. I will additionally estimate whether the health benefits and reduction in costs are equally distributed between the poorest and the least poor in society. These data will provide policymakers with evidence for whether TB-CAD offers a cost-effective and equitable approach to reversing TB epidemics in Malawi.</p>
Amount: £120,000
Darwin Tree of Life
<p>Life has evolved from a single origin to generate &gt;1.5 million eukaryotic species. Sequencing all species will provide an inventory of life, transform understanding of evolution, catalogue eukaryotic gene&nbsp;toolkits for biology and biotechnology, and enable monitoring of ecosystems under increasing stress. The Darwin Tree of Life (DToL) is a new initiative that will exploit long read technologies to sequence all 60000 species in the British Isles and play a leading role in the Earth BioGenome Project. This data resource will underpin bioscience for the coming century.</p> <p>We are a consortium of partners who will build and prove an end-to-end pipeline of sample collection, sequencing, genome assembly, annotation and data dissemination that can deliver this visionary project. We will:</p> <ul> <li> <p>Establish sample collection networks (to collect, record and voucher ~8000 species)</p> </li> <li> <p>Put in place large-scale sequencing and analytic processes (including for single cells and small-bodied taxa)</p> </li> <li> <p>Generate reference quality, deeply annotated genome assemblies for 2000 species</p> </li> <li> <p>Develop portals to disseminate the reference genomes, empowering wider scientific communities to embrace genomics in their future endeavours</p> </li> <li> <p>Share expertise in protocol development and informatics among the Darwin Tree of Life partners to strengthen institutional capacities across the consortium, and with the global EBP.</p> </li> </ul>
Amount: £141,048
Darwin Tree of Life
<p>Life has evolved from a single origin to generate &gt;1.5 million eukaryotic species. Sequencing all species will provide an inventory of life, transform understanding of evolution, catalogue eukaryotic gene&nbsp;toolkits for biology and biotechnology, and enable monitoring of ecosystems under increasing stress. The Darwin Tree of Life (DToL) is a new initiative that will exploit long read technologies to sequence all 60000 species in the British Isles and play a leading role in the Earth BioGenome Project. This data resource will underpin bioscience for the coming century.</p> <p>We are a consortium of partners who will build and prove an end-to-end pipeline of sample collection, sequencing, genome assembly, annotation and data dissemination that can deliver this visionary project. We will:</p> <ul> <li> <p>Establish sample collection networks (to collect, record and voucher ~8000 species)</p> </li> <li> <p>Put in place large-scale sequencing and analytic processes (including for single cells and small-bodied taxa)</p> </li> <li> <p>Generate reference quality, deeply annotated genome assemblies for 2000 species</p> </li> <li> <p>Develop portals to disseminate the reference genomes, empowering wider scientific communities to embrace genomics in their future endeavours</p> </li> <li> <p>Share expertise in protocol development and informatics among the Darwin Tree of Life partners to strengthen institutional capacities across the consortium, and with the global EBP.</p> </li> </ul>
Amount: £271,098
Darwin Tree of Life
<p>Life has evolved from a single origin to generate &gt;1.5 million eukaryotic species. Sequencing all species will provide an inventory of life, transform understanding of evolution, catalogue eukaryotic gene&nbsp;toolkits for biology and biotechnology, and enable monitoring of ecosystems under increasing stress. The Darwin Tree of Life (DToL) is a new initiative that will exploit long read technologies to sequence all 60000 species in the British Isles and play a leading role in the Earth BioGenome Project. This data resource will underpin bioscience for the coming century.</p> <p>We are a consortium of partners who will build and prove an end-to-end pipeline of sample collection, sequencing, genome assembly, annotation and data dissemination that can deliver this visionary project. We will:</p> <ul> <li> <p>Establish sample collection networks (to collect, record and voucher ~8000 species)</p> </li> <li> <p>Put in place large-scale sequencing and analytic processes (including for single cells and small-bodied taxa)</p> </li> <li> <p>Generate reference quality, deeply annotated genome assemblies for 2000 species</p> </li> <li> <p>Develop portals to disseminate the reference genomes, empowering wider scientific communities to embrace genomics in their future endeavours</p> </li> <li> <p>Share expertise in protocol development and informatics among the Darwin Tree of Life partners to strengthen institutional capacities across the consortium, and with the global EBP.</p> </li> </ul>
Amount: £313,996
Darwin Tree of Life
<p>Life has evolved from a single origin to generate &gt;1.5 million eukaryotic species. Sequencing all species will provide an inventory of life, transform understanding of evolution, catalogue eukaryotic gene&nbsp;toolkits for biology and biotechnology, and enable monitoring of ecosystems under increasing stress. The Darwin Tree of Life (DToL) is a new initiative that will exploit long read technologies to sequence all 60000 species in the British Isles and play a leading role in the Earth BioGenome Project. This data resource will underpin bioscience for the coming century.</p> <p>We are a consortium of partners who will build and prove an end-to-end pipeline of sample collection, sequencing, genome assembly, annotation and data dissemination that can deliver this visionary project. We will:</p> <ul> <li> <p>Establish sample collection networks (to collect, record and voucher ~8000 species)</p> </li> <li> <p>Put in place large-scale sequencing and analytic processes (including for single cells and small-bodied taxa)</p> </li> <li> <p>Generate reference quality, deeply annotated genome assemblies for 2000 species</p> </li> <li> <p>Develop portals to disseminate the reference genomes, empowering wider scientific communities to embrace genomics in their future endeavours</p> </li> <li> <p>Share expertise in protocol development and informatics among the Darwin Tree of Life partners to strengthen institutional capacities across the consortium, and with the global EBP.</p> </li> </ul>
Amount: £264,009