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University of Oxford (1,569) University of Cambridge (1,282) University College London (1,143) Imperial College London (748) University of Edinburgh (718) Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust (715) King's College London (519) University of Manchester (443) University of Bristol (420) London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (391) University of Glasgow (335) University of Dundee (312) University of Liverpool (307) The Royal British Legion (302) Newcastle University (299) University of Birmingham (298) Cardiff University (259) University of Leeds (235) King's College London (234) Queen Mary University of London (190) University of Warwick (182) University of York (177) Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (173) University of Nottingham (173) University of Sheffield (171) Merched Y Wawr (161) University of Exeter (153) University of Leicester (149) Barnardo's (144) The Guide Association (141) The Scout Association (135) Cruse Bereavement Care (129) University of Southampton (125) Alzheimer's Society (115) Church of England Children's Society (109) University College Dublin (108) University of Aberdeen (107) Institute of Cancer Research (100) Birkbeck University of London (96) The National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty (96) Volunteering Matters (95) The National Childbirth Trust (90) Queen's University Belfast (89) University of Sussex (88) St George's University of London (87) Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (86) Education Services - Headquarters (85) University of St Andrews (78) Medical Research Council (73) National University of Ireland Galway (72) See Less

Results

Alzheimer's Society - 1 22 May 2013

Support for Dementia Advisor and dementia awareness project in LB Barking & Dagenham

Amount: £10,000
Funder: London Catalyst
Recipient: Alzheimer's Society
Region: London
District: Tower Hamlets London Boro

Open access award 2015/16. 21 Sep 2015

Not available

Amount: £11,495
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Nottingham

Nanoparticles for safer and efficient delivery of radionuclides for cancer diagnosis and therapy 30 Apr 2015

We aim to address the healthcare need to effectively and safely deliver radionuclides to tumours. We have developed a novel nanoscale delivery platform based on FDAapproved materials that has the potential to seal radionuclides inside a stable inorganic shell so as to minimise side effects during cancer therapy. By utilising the clinically-proven enhanced permeation and retention effect (EPR effect) characterised by nanoparticles ( < 1 OOnm) our prototype product has the potential to significantly improve the delivery efficiency of radionuclides compared to radionuclide-molecule conjugates. This improved efficiency will allow much lower amounts of radionuclides to be used, reducing risks for both patients and healthcare workers.

Amount: £102,559
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Nottingham

Televising Childbirth: Understanding media impacts on perceptions of risk, women's choices and health. 17 Sep 2015

Seed funding is sought to develop a Collaborative Award and linked doctoral studentship that will investigate the relationship between televising childbirth and women's experiences of labour and birth. Midwives and other health care professionals debate the risks of televising childbirth, arguing that it may increase fear of birth, but this debate is happening in isolation from media/television studies that could provide methodological insights. Television scholars have identified normative repr esentations of birth but struggled to link these with impacts on women's experiences and health. The Seed Award will bring together cultural and television studies, midwifery, health humanities, industry and service-user perspectives to develop an innovative, theoretically informed approach to study childbirth on television and its implications for women's experiences of risk, choice and autonomy during pregnancy and birth. A series of activities are planned: 1. A seminar series 2. Literature se arches 3. Pilot analysis One Born Every Minute, including multi-platform elements of the series 4. Developing relationships with consumer groups and 5. with industry representatives 6. Focus groups with women and midwives and finally 7. A sandpit to synthesise findings and methodological development and to begin to develop applications for funding.

Amount: £28,822
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Nottingham

Boots and the Colonial World: Imperial Networks and the Business of Empire, 1919-1960. 17 Sep 2015

This pilot is the first phase of a larger project examining the international history of Boots. It draws on an only-recently accessible corporate archive and will feed valuable historical perspectives into Walgreens Boots Alliances (WBA) current priority area of further extending into overseas markets. The pilot has three key goals: 1.Establishing a framework history of Boots as an international business: This project will undertake a rare scholarly investigation of the WBA archive to pr oduce a timeline mapping its international retail, wholesale, drug research and pharmaceutical production activities. Two profile-raising reports on the collection will be published. 2.Conducting a pilot study of Boots colonial engagements: Within the broader framework established under (1) above, the project will undertake a more focussed study of Boots international relationships during the colonial period and within British colonial dependencies, to generate one or more scholarly articles . 3.Hosting a networking event: In the final quarter of the seed-funding period, the project will host an event at University of Nottingham, to establish a sustainable interdisciplinary scholarly network as the basis for a larger funding bid provisionally entitled 'Chemist to the Nation, Pharmacy to the World: the International History of Boots'.

Amount: £49,659
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Nottingham

Developing drugs as a treatment for myotonic dystrophy 21 May 2015

Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy in adults. It is a highly debilitating condition affecting more than 100,000 patients in developed countries with an average life expectancy of 58 years. DM1 is primarily a neuromuscular disorder, which also affects a range of other systems including the heart, brain, endocrine and digestive systems. Patients may also show specific patterns of psychological dysfunction and personality traits, cognitive impairment/mental retardation and excessive daytime sleepiness. All features show an obvious deterioration with time and difficulty swallowing and sucking food into the lungs in the later stages of the disease contribute towards chest infections and represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality. There is no treatment for DM1. DM1 is caused by a repeat expansion mutation in the 3' untranslated region of the DMPK gene. Unaffected people have 5 to 30 copies of this sequence whereas patients may have hundreds or sometimes thousands of copies. When expressed the DMPK expansion transcripts remain in the nucleus where they form distinct spots or foci. Professors Chris Hayes and David Brook at the University of Nottingham developed an assay to screen for compounds that might provide a treatment for DM1. They identified small molecules that target a novel protein and destroy the spots in DM1 cells, thereby leading to a significant reduction in the faulty RNA and other molecular features of the disorder. Their drug discovery approach, in collaboration with Argenta, a Charles River company, is based on targeting this novel protein, by refining the chemical starting points to make them more selective and more suitable for oral administration to patients. The multisystem nature of DM1 provides particular challenges but Professors Hayes and Brook anticipate that a successful drug would target most/all features of the disease

Amount: £1,558,062
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Nottingham

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship 22 Jun 2015

Not available

Amount: £27,500
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Nottingham

The Integrative Role of FIH1 in HIF-dependent Oxygen Sensing of Cardiac Cells. 07 Apr 2014

Hypoxic-inducible factor (HIF) plays a pivotal role in the transcriptional response to changes in oxygen availability in mammalian cells. Factor inhibiting HIF (FIH-1) may maintain HIF degradation under mildly reduced oxygen tension. We will investigate the role of FIH-1 in cardiac oxygen sensing using in vivo, ex vivo and in vitro approaches. We hypothesize that hearts of FIH1-/- mice will be sensitized to chronic hypoxic exposure and have abnormal mitochondrial oxygen sensing. Mechanisms of reduced myocardial contractility of FIH1 null heart muscle will be elucidated using single fibre techniques in the light of recent in vivo pilot data. Mice will be subsequently housed in chronic hypoxia. Carbohydrate and fatty acid fluxes would be measured in isolated perfused hearts using dual 14C and 3H radiolabelling. Cardiac function will be assessed in both Langendorff perfused hearts and isolated contracting myocytes. Electronmicroscopy would examine the effects of hypoxia on mitochondrial morphology and cellular location of the HIF proteins. The results would contribute to a greater understanding of the role of FIH-1 in oxygen sensing in cardiac cells and allow assessment of whether targeting FIH-1 may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of ischaemic heart disease.

Amount: £379,184
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Nottingham

PILOT - Cord Trial: Feasibility of conducting a trial evaluating timing of cord clamping for preterms in low and middle income countries 03 Jun 2014

This proposal addresses a series of questions necessary to establish the feasibility ofconducting the Cord Trial in low and middle income countries. Specifically, these are:2.1 What is current practice for timing of cord clamping at preterm, and term, births?2.2 What proportion of births meet the Cord Trial eligibility criteria (28-34 weeks gestation, or1–2 kg birthweight); of these what proportion can be identified before birth, and areappropriate clinical staff present to potentially recruit and deliver the interventions?2.3 For births at 28-34 weeks gestation (or 1-2kg birthweight), what is current practice forcare of the baby in the delivery room, and what is the outcome at hospital discharge?2.4 Can accurate information about timing of cord clamping, and care for the baby in the firstfew minutes after birth, be collected within routine clinical practice?2.5 Does gestation influence the volume and duration of placental transfusion?2.6 What are the potential barriers to recruitment and compliance with the trial interventions,and what are the views and attitudes of clinicians about timing of cord clamping?

Amount: £30,534
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Nottingham
Amount: £1,048,501
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Nottingham

Open access publishing costs 2014/15. 15 Sep 2014

Not available

Amount: £11,495
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Nottingham

Structure-aided discovery of kinase inhibitors as targeted therapeutic agents for breast cancer 24 Oct 2013

Kinases are important targets for blocking cancer progression. However, many remain to be exploited. For example, no drugs are yet available to specifically inhibit any kinase which is switched on by a regulatory protein called calmodulin. Nonetheless, faulty expression of these “CaMK” enzymes is now thought to play a key role in breast cancer progression. The Wellcome Trust has funded the CAMSEED consortium to discover small molecule inhibitors for a CaMK protein involved in basal-like breast cancer. The three dimensional structure of this target has been solved by the Structural Genomics Consortium and Professor Stefan Knapp at the University of Oxford. Interactions with small molecules are being screened by Professor Michael Overduin’s lab at the University of Birmingham using superconducting magnets and high throughput robots at the national HWB-NMR facility. The design of improved inhibitors that can enter cells and selectively block the oncogenic state is being led by Professor Peter Fischer at the University of Nottingham, with Colin Kenyon at CSIR, Pretoria, designing deuterated analogs for enhanced activity. The result of the two year project is expected to be a set of lead molecules for development as potential therapeutic agents for breast cancer, and may yield a new approach for using nature’s own inhibitory mechanisms to block cancer-causing kinases.

Amount: £287,573
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Nottingham

Structure-aided discovery of kinase inhibitors as targeted therapeutic agents for breast cancer 15 Sep 2014

Kinases are important targets for blocking cancer progression. However, many remain to be exploited. For example, no drugs are yet available to specifically inhibit any kinase which is switched on by a regulatory protein called calmodulin. Nonetheless, faulty expression of these “CaMK” enzymes is now thought to play a key role in breast cancer progression. The Wellcome Trust has funded the CAMSEED consortium to discover small molecule inhibitors for a CaMK protein involved in basal-like breast cancer. The three dimensional structure of this target has been solved by the Structural Genomics Consortium and Professor Stefan Knapp at the University of Oxford. Interactions with small molecules are being screened by Professor Michael Overduin’s lab at the University of Birmingham using superconducting magnets and high throughput robots at the national HWB-NMR facility. The design of improved inhibitors that can enter cells and selectively block the oncogenic state is being led by Professor Peter Fischer at the University of Nottingham, with Colin Kenyon at CSIR, Pretoria, designing deuterated analogs for enhanced activity. The result of the two year project is expected to be a set of lead molecules for development as potential therapeutic agents for breast cancer, and may yield a new approach for using nature’s own inhibitory mechanisms to block cancer-causing kinases.

Amount: £50,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Nottingham

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship 23 Jun 2014

Not available

Amount: £28,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Nottingham

Open access award 2013/14. 16 Sep 2013

Not available

Amount: £30,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Nottingham

Using animals to benefit animals: How should the UK veterinary profession manage the social and ethical implications of the clinical use of donated companion animal blood and tissue? 12 Dec 2012

The use of healthy human blood and tissue in transfusion, transplant, researchand biobanking is commonplace and social and ethical issues such as motivation, consent, harm and altruism have long been debated. The first pet blood bank in the UK was launched in 2007. Vets are now embracing transfusion medicine and learning from the medical profession and other countries such as the USA, where animal blood banking and organ transplantation have been in existence for over 20 years. A further recent UK development is Veterinary Tissue Bank. The current growth of this area of veterinary medicine urgently demands a close examination of the social and ethical justification for such practices; providing a sound basis for progression. This project will generate novel empirical data on the values and expectationsof animal owners, the veterinary profession and other stakeholders. It will identify ethical similarities and differences between the medical and veterinary fields by reviewing existing literature. Dissemination will includepublications and presentations aimed at academics in social science, bioethicsand veterinary ethics, clinicians and the general public. Ultimately the project aims to produce policy recommendations for the veterinary community about the current and future regulation of these kinds oftechniques and technologies.

Amount: £246,273
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Nottingham

'Witness' Seminar on the genesis, implementation and legacy of the 'Changing Childbirth' Report. 24 Jun 2013

The Changing Childbirth Report was produced in 1993 by the Expert Maternity Group, convened by the Conservative Government. It was widely heralded for enshrining ideas of choice, control and continuity for women. The Report was regarded as ground-breaking, and led to the creation of many practice initiatives designed to support the Reports core recommendations. The language and philosophy of care which it espoused have continued to resonate in policy documents (for example Maternity Matters, 2 007 and Midwifery 2020, 2010) and in the language of stakeholders such as the Royal College of Midwives, the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists and the National Childbirth Trust. The proposed 'witness' seminar will give key players the chance to reflect on a variety of practical and philosophical issues surrounding the Report and its implementation. Exploration of the period from an historical perspective is in its infancy, and this seminar will provide an oral history resource f or use by policy makers, historians, practitioners and consumers. The event will take place in October 2013 in London with an invited panel and audience including Expert Maternity Group members, midwives, obstetricians, paediatricians and policy makers.

Amount: £5,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Nottingham

Modern Dwelling and the Healthy Body Culture in Germany, 1870-1933. 28 May 2013

I am planning to undertake archival research in Germany for my research project, Modern Dwelling and the Healthy Body Culture in Germany, 1870-1933. The sources and areas of inquiry include a number of disciplinary frameworks. In addition to art and architectural history, this study draws from medical histories and histories of German reform movements to set up a context for the healthy body culture and its influence on domestic architecture. The sources used are books and articles written by architects and critics, architectural drawings, photographs, furniture catalogues and popular hygienic literature including hygiene and health manuals, family advice books, advertisements featuring hygienic domestic products, illustrations of the healthy and degenerate bodies, books and articles written by physicians and life reformers. The project is not only concerned with the physical transformation, but also the changing perceptions of the dwelling.

Amount: £4,998
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Nottingham