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University of Oxford (1,569) University of Cambridge (1,282) University College London (1,143) Imperial College London (748) University of Edinburgh (718) Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust (565) King's College London (519) University of Manchester (443) University of Bristol (420) London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (391) University of Glasgow (335) University of Dundee (312) University of Liverpool (307) Newcastle University (299) The Royal British Legion (299) University of Birmingham (298) Cardiff University (259) University of Leeds (235) King's College London (217) Queen Mary University of London (190) University of Warwick (182) University of York (177) Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (173) University of Nottingham (173) University of Sheffield (171) Merched Y Wawr (159) University of Exeter (153) University of Leicester (149) Barnardo's (135) University of Southampton (125) The Scout Association (120) The Guide Association (119) Alzheimer's Society (112) University College Dublin (108) University of Aberdeen (107) Church of England Children's Society (104) Institute of Cancer Research (100) Birkbeck University of London (96) The National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty (93) Cruse Bereavement Care (90) Queen's University Belfast (89) University of Sussex (88) St George's University of London (87) The National Childbirth Trust (86) Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (86) Education Services - Headquarters (85) Volunteering Matters (83) University of St Andrews (78) Medical Research Council (73) National University of Ireland Galway (72) See Less

Results

LifeLines 20 Apr 2016

This is the expansion of a project supporting volunteers aged 50 plus to run activities for vulnerable older people to improve health and well-being. These have previously included art classes, creative writing, yoga and computer club. The group will expand across the city, recruiting more volunteers, supporting more than 800 new people and establishing a Men’s Network to encourage older men to socialise regularly. It will also extend its HealthLink scheme to help older people get to medical appointments.

Kilkeel RBL - Saving Our Community Venue 22 Oct 2015

The group is a community and voluntary based organisation providing a range of services and activities to the local community. They received a grant of £10,000 to make improvements to their venue so that it can be used for more classes and activities.

Grant to Royal British Legion Tipton Branch 19 May 2016

Remembering Tipton's World War One Heroes

Grant awarded to The Royal British Legion (Forest Hall) Branch And Club (Tyne & Wear) 20 Nov 1998

Towards improving access and facilities for disabled people at the Forest Hall Ex-Servicemen's Institute.

Grant awarded to Community Service Volunteers (Training and Enterprise NE) (Tyne & Wear) 13 Jul 2004

To provide daycare services to older people living in high rise flats in Newcastle.

Translational Medicine and Therapeutics Programme at Imperial College London: 'The genetic determinants of right ventricular dysfunction'. 31 Aug 2012

Right ventricular failure is a major determinant of survival in pulmonary hypertension (PH). Some patients tolerate pressure overload for a considerable period, while other deteriorate more rapidly. Right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy is the typical response of the compensated myocardium. Patients who deteriorate exhibit dilatation. The factors underlying this differential response are poorly understood. 3D cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) provides high spatial definition and, coupled with atlasing techniques, provides improved power in detecting regional changes in anatomy and physiology. I propose to employ this approach in a detailed study of the RV response to PH to better understand the transition from a compensated to a decompensated myocardium. I will: 1. Develop an atlas for the right heart in healthy volunteers using 3D CMR to examine the population variation in anatomy and physiology. 2. Correlate this with anthropometric and cardiac data (e.g. ECG, blood pressure) to understand the variables that influence mass, shape and ejection fraction. 3. Explore for association between RV phenotype and genomic variants. 4. Use CMR data to compare and describe the RV in a cohort of patients with PH. 5. Relate changes in RV anatomy and function during a 1 year period of follow up to (i) survival in the PH cohort and (ii) genomic variants associated with RV phenotype.

Amount: £337,483
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Imperial College London

Open access award. 20 Sep 2011

Not available

Amount: £200,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Imperial College London

'Your Heart in Their Hands, or Your Hands in Their Heart' - exploring perspectives through simulation 12 Jan 2011

The role of technology in clinical care is growing at a dizzying pace, and the treatment of many serious conditions has been revolutionised by new techniques and procedures. This project explores the potential of simulation to recreate and present one high-tech procedure (coronary angiography) for public engagement. Development by a multidisciplinary team will culminate in a series performances targeted at selected groups. Heart attacks kill over 100,000 people every year in the UK. Many people with sudden chest pain now undergo coronary angioplasty within an hour of calling for help. A flexible wire is inserted into a blood vessel in the groin under local anaesthetic, threaded up into the heart, then used in conjunction with miniature balloons to dilate narrowed sections of coronary artery. Although routine to clinicians, this can be a frightening experience for the patient, who is conscious during the entire procedure. Patients seldom know what they should expect, and their perspective is entirely different from that of the clinical team and can easily be undervalued. This project will use highly realistic physical simulation to present an angiography suite as a performance space. The simulation will offer two simultaneous perspectives- the patient's and the clinician's. By making a closed world (of clinical practice) accessible to lay audiences, a fascinating yet scary environment will be opened for inspection. In the process we hope that complex technology will be demystified, at the same time as exploring its potential for artistic expression. Evaluation and dissemination are integral to the project's design.

Amount: £29,120
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Imperial College London

Identifying bacterial regulatory determinants of Mycobacterium marinum-zebrafish infection 31 Aug 2011

The success of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), which causes tuberculosis in humans, can be attributed mainly to its ability to establish lifelong, asymptomatic latent infection within the host from which it can reactivate. Two-component signal transduction systems (TCSS), which regulate many physiological processes in bacteria, have been implicated in Mtb virulence buttheir precise roles are unclear. The key goals of the project will be: (1) to use the experimentally tractable, natural infection model provided by the M. marinum-zebrafish system to interrogate the role of TCSS in mycobacterial infection to obtain information relevant to their role in human tuberculosis. This will be achieved by investigating the effect of mutating 11 of the M. marinum TCSS on its pathogenesis in zebrafish infection models and evaluating how this affects interactions with the innate immune system. (2) To investigate the hypoxic nature of zebrafish granulomas using a chemical hypoxia sensor. (3) To investigate the temporal induction of gene expression during infection by constructing TCSS regulon reporters and developing transcriptional profiling methods to study changes in M. marinum gene expression during infection.

Amount: £156,706
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Imperial College London

Identification and characterisation of genes involved in spore germination of Clostridium difficile. 17 Jan 2011

The aim of this project is to study the temporal expression of genes during C. difficile endospore germination. The objectives are: 1.1. To identify genes implicated in endospore germination, with a particular interest in genes encoding components of the cell wall 1.2. To construct gene knock-outs and use gene knock-down technologies to study the role of specific genes in germination 1.3. To analyse endospores of knock-out and knock-down strains for their ability to germinate in vitro as well as in vivo using a mouse model of infection.

Amount: £15,241
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Imperial College London

Wellcome Trust Clinical PhD Programme at Imperial College London 20 Sep 2011

Glucagon (GCG) is a natural pancreatic hormone that controls carbohydrate and fat metabolism, suppresses appetite, increases energy expenditure and stimulates insulin secretion. Recently, it has been found that the glucagon receptor (GCG-R) may interact with RAMP2, a member of the family of Receptor Activity-Modifying Proteins, which are accessory transmembrane proteins that associate with Class II G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) to alter their ligand binding properties. This project aims to study the interaction of GCG-R with RAMP2, with the following goals: 1. To prove that RAMP2 and GCG-R interact directly. 2. To understand the effect of this interaction on the binding of GCG by GCG-R. 3. To understand the effect of this interaction on the activation of GCG-R by GCG. 4. To understand the role this interaction plays in the co-localisation of GCG-R and RAMP2 in the cell membrane. An understanding of the role that RAMP2 plays in modifying the function of GCG-R may assist in devising a selective agonist of GCG-R that possesses therapeutically desirable properties (e.g. appetite suppression, increase in energy expenditure) without undesirable properties (e.g. increasing hepatic glucose output).

Amount: £226,785
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Imperial College London

Role of CD1d in the regulation of tumour-propagating cells in multiple myeloma 20 Sep 2011

The pathogenic role of B cells in autoimmunity is well established, both through maturation into plasma cells and also in antigen presentation to T cells. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) associated vasculitis (AAV) is a multisystem disorder associated with significant morbidity and mortality. A subset of B cells capable of inhibiting inflammatory responses and inducing immune tolerance has been termed regulatory B cells (Bregs). Recent reports have shown functional deficiency of Bregs in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and in one recent study, patients with AAV in remission have been found to have increased numbers of B regs. This project aims to identify the role of Bregs in AAV and assess their therapeutic potential. I hypothesise that Bregs are deficient in patients with active AAV, may increase in proportion in disease remission, and could be amenable to ex vivo expansion for possible therapeutic use Using flow cytometry, the proportion of Bregs in patients with active AAV will be compared with those in remission, and with healthy controls. Breg function will be assessed by measurement of anti-inflammatory cytokines including IL 10 and TGFbeta, markers of activation such as B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS), and suppression of T cell responses. I will attempt to expand isolated Bregs and assess their ability to suppress T cell activation. I will also use a rat model of MPO-ANCA vasculitis to identify Bregs and assess their ability to control disease, using cell transfer experiments.

Amount: £250,778
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Imperial College London

Wellcome Trust Clinical PhD Programme at Imperial College London: 'The critical role of lung-marginated monocytes in transplant-associated acute lung injury'. 31 Aug 2011

Acute lung injury (ALI) within the lung transplantation paradigm is a major cause of rejection of potential donor organs and graft dysfunction in recipients. A combination of donor lung inflammation (DLI) in addition to ischaemia-reperfusion exposure is now considered responsible for its limited success. We hypothesise that DLI has a substantial impact on transplant-related ALI, and specifically that monocytes marginated within the microvasculature of the donor lungs interact with the pulmonary endothelium and play a key role in its pathogenesis. We have established an ex vivo model of DLI, utilising a mouse isolated perfused lung (IPL) preparation which provides an intact whole organ system without systemic influence. We aim to: 1. Profile the role of lung-marginated monocytes in DLI and their contribution to transplant-associated ALI utilising the ex vivo IPL and monocyte depletion techniques 2. Investigate the precise molecular mechanisms of monocyte-endothelial interactions utilising temporal chimaeras in in vitro co-culture and ex vivo IPL 3. Relate our findings to the clinical paradigm by investigating human lung transplant samples The results of this work will provide important insights into mechanisms and potential therapeutic avenues, in DLI and lung transplantation, positively impacting on the success of this procedure.

Amount: £269,631
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Imperial College London

Mitochondria-targeted protective strategies for limiting injury in the developing brain. 03 Mar 2011

We have established a Strategic Initiative to combat cerebral palsy, focussing on the mechanisms and treatment of perinatal brain damage. Brain injury evolves over many hours after the insult, and interventions (hypothermia) administered after hypoxia-ischaemia improves outcome. However, hypothermia only saves one baby in eight and we need to obtain a better understanding of the pathophysiology to improve things further. Our hypothesis is that mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (MP) trigge red by the pro-apototic protein Bax is a key event in secondary brain injury. More specifically the research objectives are to explore (i) the role of Bax/Bak dependent permeabilization in hypoxia-ischemia; (ii) to what extent the up-stream regulation of MP involves cytosolic p53 and caspase-2 and (iii) how these mechanisms are modulated by inflammation. As injury in both white and grey matter is common in preterm and term infants, we will investigate mechanisms in neurons and oligodendrocyte pr ecursors (OPCs) using in vivo (transgenic mice, siRNA) and in vitro (cell lines, primary cultures, and isolated mitochondria) models. This work will increase understanding of the mechanisms of perinatal brain injury and result in development of cerebroprotective strategies to reduce the severe adverse consequences of injury in the immature brain.

Amount: £1,096,179
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Imperial College London

Genetic analysis of post-developmental Rho GTPase signaling: identification and characterization of Rho signaling pathways required during the C. elegans immune response. 23 Jun 2009

Rho signaling pathways have been extensively studied in cell-based assays however the importance of these pathways in whole adult organisms remains unclear. My previous work has shown that adult C. elegans can be used as a model to study post-developmental roles of Rho signaling. Here I am focusing on the role of Rho in altering cell morphology during the C. elegans innate immune response. Using RNAi feeding libraries and forward genetic approaches my research will identify the upstream regulato rs and downstream effectors of Rho required for this process. In addition I will exploit my work demonstrating that Rho and MAPKinase act together to alter cell morphology during this response in order to dissect the interactions between these two pathways. A key goal of this research is to identify Rho signaling pathways important for the control of cell morphology in adult animals and to understand how these pathways interact with others. Understanding these signaling pathways will provide insights into Rho s role in normal cell function during processes such as innate immunity and is likely to tell us more about how mis-regulation can lead to immunological defects and diseases such as cancer. Drugs that target these effectors may have therapeutic benefit.

Amount: £738,540
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Imperial College London

Between therapy, prevention and growth enhancement: Veterinary antibiotics and intensive farming in France and Britain, 1945-1970. 28 Nov 2008

My research will analyse the three agricultural uses of antibiotics - as therapy, preventive medicine and growth promotion in Britain and France over the period 1945-70. I will examine how these roles both drove and developed in response to - Experiences of antibiotic uses in the field, including changing disease pictures emerging as a result of intensification - Changes in scientific understandings of antibiotics, including concerns arising from the 1950s about bacterial resistance and it s implications for human and animal health - Changes in veterinary expertise, priorities and relationships with other parties involved in antibiotic production and use, namely farmers, drug and food companies, agricultural scientists and advisers. - The involvement of drug and food companies in agriculture and animal health - The growth of agricultural scientific research and advisory services - National and international shifts in agricultural policy, the economy and trade

Amount: £142,143
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Imperial College London

NK-cell receptors and function in Hepatitis C virus infection. 01 Apr 2009

NK-cells are delicately balanced by an array of activatory and inhibitory receptors controlling their effector functions. Previous work from our group identified that polymorphisms in killer cell immunoglobulin receptor (KIR) genes encoding for receptors expressed on NK-cells - can influence the outcome of HCV infection. Studies peformed by our group and others have found that the CD94-NKG2A inhibitory receptor is expressed more commonly on NK-cells in hosts with chronic HCV infection compar ed to-NK cells from healthy controls. The aims of this research project are to: (1)Understand how changes in the levels of NKG2A expression affect the level of inhibition of NK-cells and determine the relevance of this in individuals with chronic HCV infection. (2)Determine if secretion of IL-10 in HCV infected individuals is associated with specific sub-populations of NK-cells and thus changes in NK cell receptor expression (3)Investigate the abnormalities of NK cell signalling pathways in chronic HCV to determine the molecular mechanisms underlying these changes

Amount: £224,291
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Imperial College London

The protective role of neutrophils in human tuberculosis. 25 Mar 2009

There is mounting evidence that neutrophils are powerfully mycobactericidal and may contribute significantly to the early containment of tuberculosis infection. It is also believed that HIV compromises neutrophil number and function, which may in part explain the increased susceptibility of HIV positive people to tuberculosis. This study aims to first assess the relative contribution of neutrophils to mycobacterial restriction compared to other cell types in a whole blood model, before furthe r exploration of the mechanisms of killing. Subsequently the impact of HIV on neutrophil defense against mycobacteria will be investigated, including whether any impairment can be overcome with neutrophil enrichment. The impact of antiretroviral therapy on neutrophil number and function will be explored prospectively, aiming to assess to what extent this explains the improvements in mycobacterial suppression previously seen with this therapy. Simultaneously, in large cohorts of HIV positive people the predictive value of peripheral neutrophil count on risk of acquiring new or active tuberculosis will be evaluated. The ultimate therapeutic aim would be to consider enhancing neutrophil count or function in recently exposed tuberculosis contacts without existing evidence of infection in order to prevent them from developing disease.

Amount: £326,500
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Imperial College London

Functional magnetic resonance imaging of appetite and eating behaviour in obesity surgery. 01 Apr 2009

Appetite and eating behaviour changes after obesity surgery are poorly understood. It is likely that alterations in brain reward system play a key role in weight loss. By visualizing activity in brain food reward systems when viewing food pictures, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we will be able to demonstrate how brain activation related to food craving is altered by the 2 different surgical procedures. We will also examine whether baseline psychiatric, psychological and fM RI characteristics predict weight loss after surgery. Comparison will be made between obese patients who have previously undergone (i) gastric bypass and (ii) gastric banding surgery, and (iii) un-operated obese patients, and (iv) after temporary reversal of the anorexigenic gut hormone increases seen after gastric bypass surgery. In a prospective study, weight loss at one year post-surgery will be compared between patients with and without binge eating disorder and correlated with other bas eline psychological measurements and fMRI activation in brain food reward systems. Identifying the brain pathways through which obesity surgery works and understanding of the neuropsychological predictors of individual responses to obesity surgery, will aid the use and choice of surgery, and development of novel treatments for obesity, less invasive and risky than surgery.

Amount: £210,399
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Imperial College London

Politics and practice: The British Veterinary Association 1881-2009 30 Jan 2009

The project will outline the history of the British Veterinary Association from its foundation (as National Veterinary Medical Association) in 1881 to the present day. It will explore the key activities of the BVA, its motives and achievements, and its leading figures The BVA is the representative body of the British veterinary profession. Its role is to promote veterinary interests to government, users of veterinary services and other stakeholders in animal health. (BVA, 2008)Throughout its history, it has aimed to reconcile differences of opinion within its diverse and often individualistic membership. Its changing structure and organization reflected shifts in veterinary roles and identities, while its publications and educational initiatives reveal the changing nature of veterinary knowledge and expertise. It therefore offers a unique window onto the history of the British veterinary profession. The goals of this project are: To produce a historical account of the BVA's organization, priorities, activities and relationships To provide insights into the broader history of veterinary medicine that will act as a basis for future, more detailed work on the history of veterinary science, practice, politics and expertise. To produce, for the interest of the veterinary profession and as a resource for other historians, a set of interviews with surviving BVA leaders

Amount: £5,120
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Imperial College London