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Results

Vacation Scholarships 2008. 27 May 2008

Not available

Amount: £22,800
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London

Value in People Award. 17 Oct 2007

Not available

Amount: £350,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London

The London Pain Consortium. 07 Nov 2007

Chronic pain is prevalent and its clinical treatment remains limited. The London Pain Consortium (LPC) will advance knowledge of chronic pain mechanisms through internationally competitive research and provide multidisciplinary training of clinical and biomedical scientists to promote careers in neurobiology in general and pain studies in particular. In man and animals, we will: 1) identify molecular and genetic influences on pain processes; 2) study the integrative functions of these influenc es and their translation as therapeutic targets; 3) provide research and training resources for the wider scientific community.

Amount: £3,233,953
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London

Student Elective Prize for Ms Sarah M Elsabagh 29 Aug 2008

Public awareness and malaria prevention practice in Vanuatu

Amount: £1,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London

Student Elective Prize for Ms Victoria A Bennett 29 Aug 2008

Public awareness and malaria prevention practice in Vanuatu

Amount: £1,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London

Student Elective Prize for Ms Elizabeth Boleat 29 Aug 2008

Gender Issues related to spaceflight

Amount: £1,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London

Student Elective Prize for Mr Ashwin Kumaria 29 Aug 2008

Effects of normobaric hyperoxia on an in vitro cell-stretch model of traumatic brain injury

Amount: £1,600
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London

Student Elective Prize for Ms Kate Duhig 29 Aug 2008

The Spengler TB-100 blood pressure device and its impact on antenatal referral practices in Gimbie, Ethiopia.

Amount: £1,200
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London

Student Elective Prize for Mr Lowell Ling 29 Aug 2008

Bone formation and vascularisation on porous bioactive glass scaffolds.

Amount: £600
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London

Application for funding of intensive short courses in integrative biology. 03 Jul 2007

The production of suitably-qualified medical researchers is essential not only for drug research and development (a major contributor to UK science and economy), but also for the development of further alternatives to animals for pharmacological and toxicological screening of new chemicals and drugs. During their careers, well-trained biological researchers will minimise the usage of animals and any unavoidable suffering by conducting well-considered and expertly-designed experiments. The British Pharmacological Society (BPS) and the Physiological Society have joined together since 2002 to provide short courses that enable undergraduate (in their penultimate year) and postgraduate students and when appropriate postdoctoral workers in pharmacology, physiology, biomedical sciences or related degrees to gain an in depth understanding of in vivo research techniques. The courses are aimed at undergraduate and postgraduate students who are intending to pursue a career in integrative biomedical research.

Amount: £60,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London

London Pain consortium: 18 Jul 2007

Not available

Amount: £145,130
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London

London Pain Consortium 18 Jul 2007

Not available

Amount: £145,130
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London

London Pain Consortium 18 Jul 2007

The benefits of the extra year of training and study at the beginning of the Wellcome 4 year PhD are mainly self explanatory. I feel that any lengthy or challenging project benefits from a greater amount of preparation, diverse experience and familiarity with the relevant material. Especially in a field as multifaceted as neuroscience, multidisciplinary approaches are essential for those wishing to fully tackle and dissect a problem. I also appreciate the possibility of greater control in the choice of my eventual PhD, given the ability of the student to select which of their first year lab rotations to prioritise in their remaining three years. The prospect of further study in neuroscience seemed tenuous at best until my third undergraduate year. That year, I worked at MSD's (now sadly defunct) Terlings Park Neuroscience Research Centre on a one year Industrial Placement. I relished the chance to do research and, to some extent, direct my own project, and greatly enjoyed the many different varieties of lab experience I accumulated during the year. It was also the year that my neuroscience knowledge was finally sufficient for me to appreciate and assimilate papers from most areas of the field. The fortunate coincidence of having free access to most journals in print via the company library, meant that my knowledge and interest in the field took a giant leap forward. The close-knit lab group I worked with, many of whom remain close friends, impressed upon me the social and interdependent nature of lab research. The very positive experience of my time in industry has made me eager to pursue a future career in neuroscience.

Amount: £145,130
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London

Early recurrent pain and its effect on adult pain processing. 20 Dec 2006

This project therefore takes a multidisciplinary approach by combining psychological and behavioural assessment of children with recurrent pain together with an animal behavioural study of the effects of recurrent pain in juvenile rats. The student will therefore be primarily supervised by Prof. Maria Fitzgerald with psychological supervison from Prof Amanda Williams, Reader in Clinical Health Psychology at UCL.

Amount: £19,150
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London

Integrating places of worship (PoWs) into the primary care pathway to prevent and control non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in the Caribbean 15 Mar 2016

We will evaluate the integration of health advocates in places of worship into the primary care pathway and the potential impact on health literacy, adoption of healthy lifestyles, early detection and referral, and NCD management. The Caribbean has the highest NCD mortality in the Americas placing huge pressure on fragile health systems. Task shifting and collaborative community-based interventions are advocated to reduce inequalities in health and address the burden of NCD, but have seldom been evaluated in LMIC. The intervention will be conducted in 3 of the least affluent CARICOM countries with differing sociocultural contexts to enhance adaptability. We will recruit health advocates from places of worship in poor urban and rural communities to conduct health promotion activities, support treatment adherence, and ensure prompt referral. Our intervention has the features of a complex intervention, i.e. multiple components and outcomes, interactions and feedback loops between intervention and context. Based on the principles of realist evaluation and MRC guidelines for the evaluation of complex interventions, we will evaluate the intervention in real time to observe the interaction between the context of the intervention, the mechanism (how it works), and the outcomes. We will use a mixed methods approach including: 1) concept mapping with stakeholders to gather information on factors influencing implementation, prioritise areas for health system improvement, and foster collaboration; 2) observation and interviews with congregants and health advocates to track the implementation in context over time; 3) quantitative survey of congregants at baseline and endline to examine the influence of the intervention on lifestyle change, health literacy, satisfaction with services, and well-being. If the intervention is successful we will develop a toolkit for up-scaling across the Caribbean through established partnerships with health ministries and regional stakeholders.

Amount: £192,444
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London

High resolution microCT 16 Jun 2016

This application requests funding for a micro-Computed Tomography (microCT) imaging system. The microCT allows for high resolution imaging of specimens using X-rays to create cross sections of an object, which can be recombined to create a 3D image without the requirement for actual slicing or sectioning. This enables tissue to be analysed quickly without damage, so that the same specimen can be utilised for further protocols (in situ hybridisation, immunohistochemistry, histology etc). The scanning technique importantly allows for specific areas to be highlighted and segmented in order to isolate tissues of interest virtually for analysis. The imaging allows for quantitative measurement of samples to be taken, such as volume measurements of specific tissue or hard tissue (bone/enamel/dentine) density. The microCT requested will be utilised almost exclusively by a small team of internationally renown researchers investigating craniofacial development and regeneration, using the equipment to image and measure both hard and soft tissue changes in mouse models of human disorders, in human embryonic tissue and in regenerating tissues. The key goal will be to allow fast and accurate imaging and quantification of important samples to stimulate our understanding of development and disorders, and enhance the move towards new regenerative therapies.

Amount: £262,937
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London

King’s NMR Facility for structural biology, metabolic profiling and drug discovery 16 Jun 2016

We seek a one-third contribution from the Trust towards the acquisition of 800MHz and 600MHz NMR spectrometers and resources for automation to be housed within the existing NMR Facility in the Centre for Biomolecular Spectroscopy at King’s. The new equipment will deliver higher resolution, sensitivity and throughput and enjoy the benefits of the very latest advances in electronics, probe design and automation, enabling the implementation of new methodologies that are not possible on the current instrumentation. This will create a state-of-the-art centre for high-resolution and high-throughput applications to support a large and vibrant research community (including several externally-funded Centres) that has experienced a remarkable growth in NMR-based research, from structural biology to drug discovery and metabolomics. The expanded Facility will provide a centre for scientists from 18 departments spread over 4 Faculties, including biologists, chemists and clinicians. It will promote exchange of ideas and catalyse unique and innovative interdisciplinary approaches for tackling fundamental biomedical questions and meeting new therapeutic challenges in the fields of cardiovascular disease, neurological disorders, diseases of pregnancy, viral infections and cancer. This instrumentation will support King’s major strategic goal of fostering close relationships between basic and clinical scientists, aiming to provide real benefits for human health.

Amount: £1,000,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London

Open access block grant 2016/17 30 Sep 2016

Not available

Amount: £161,223
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London

Characterization of human interferon stimulatory genes with antiviral potential against Ebola virus 27 Apr 2017

The understanding of the innate immune response to the highly pathogenic ebolavirus (EBOV) is currently limited. This project focuses on the IFN-stimulated gene SLC15a3 and its antiviral effect on EBOV in a recent unpublished screen by the host laboratory. The first main goal is to characterize how SLC15a3 inhibits EBOV replication using a safe replication-defective version of the virus by analyzing its effects on viral mRNA and genomic RNA production by qRT-PCR. Biochemically and fluorescently tagged versions of SLC15A3 will be analyzed by fluorescence microscopy to determine its localization within the cell and by using site directed mutagenesis to mutate the trafficking sequence of SLC15a3 to observe what effect this has on its antiviral properties. The second goal is to produce CRISPR/CAS9 SLC15a3 knockout cells and determine what effect the absence of SLC15a3 has on the sensitivity of the EBOV-like particles to type 1 IFN treatment. This project will lead to a greater understanding on how SLC15a3 effects the lifecycle of ebolavirus.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London

Nociceptive and anti-nociceptive actions of Cnidaria toxins. 27 Apr 2017

Chronic pain is prevalent, affecting 20% of adults (eg https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK92525/). It is poorly controlled by existing therapies because of limited efficacy or very significant side effects. We know that most chronic pain can be relieved – at least temporarily – by local anaesthetic blockade of peripheral nerves. Genetic studies have identified some ion channels that are specifically expressed in sensory neurones that, when mutated, cause either congenital analgesia (total absence of pain sensibility, specifically seen with mutations in Nav1.7) or episodic spontaneous pain. Natural occurring toxins and venoms have been found to have a range of actions on these peripherally expressed ion channels. For instance, Omega-Conotoxin from cone snails is a selective calcium channel blocker that has found limited use (because of side effects) in the treatment of intractable pain. Cnidaria (jellyfish, corals etc.) are amongst the most iconic residents of the sea and are arguably the most primitive of venomous animals, yet their venoms have never been screened for neurotoxic compounds. This project will test the hypothesis that Cnidarian toxins will affect affect the excitability of adult rodent nociceptors studied in vitro.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London