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Results

LifeLines 20 Apr 2016

This is the expansion of a project supporting volunteers aged 50 plus to run activities for vulnerable older people to improve health and well-being. These have previously included art classes, creative writing, yoga and computer club. The group will expand across the city, recruiting more volunteers, supporting more than 800 new people and establishing a Men’s Network to encourage older men to socialise regularly. It will also extend its HealthLink scheme to help older people get to medical appointments.

Kilkeel RBL - Saving Our Community Venue 22 Oct 2015

The group is a community and voluntary based organisation providing a range of services and activities to the local community. They received a grant of £10,000 to make improvements to their venue so that it can be used for more classes and activities.

Grant to Royal British Legion Tipton Branch 19 May 2016

Remembering Tipton's World War One Heroes

Grant awarded to The Royal British Legion (Forest Hall) Branch And Club (Tyne & Wear) 20 Nov 1998

Towards improving access and facilities for disabled people at the Forest Hall Ex-Servicemen's Institute.

Grant awarded to Community Service Volunteers (Training and Enterprise NE) (Tyne & Wear) 13 Jul 2004

To provide daycare services to older people living in high rise flats in Newcastle.

Cytoadherence-mediated pathology in cerebral malaria. 10 May 2011

The outcome of this work will be to have tested the primary hypothesis that the efficiency of recruitment to endothelium at the vessel wall is a major component of disease in P. falciparum malaria. In addition we will understand how different endothelial receptors contribute to this recruitment and retention of IE. This research will also provide information on the impact of cytoadherence on the circulation, the local endothelial response (inflammation and signalling) and effects at the level of the tissue. Our intention is to use this data to identify specific adhesion-based therapies that target recruitment and retention of IE in the brain and develop them into products that will reduce the mortality of cerebral malaria.

Amount: £1,517,906
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine

Investigating patterns of insecticide resistance in Central African populations of Anopheles funestus a major malaria vector 07 Apr 2011

DDT and dieldrin resistance was recently observed in a Cameroonian An. funestus population. The resistance status to the pyrethroid insecticides, used to treat bednets, is unknown. There are also fears that unless barriers to gene flow exist, these resistances could spread rapidly throughout Cameroon and neighbouring countries such as Gabon and Congo and disrupt malaria control programs in Central Africa. However, little is known about the extent, distribution and mechanisms of insecticide resistance in An. funestus throughout the country and Central Africa. Such information is crucial for a successful implementation and management of control programs against this important malaria vector. Therefore, to improve our ability to control malaria in Central Africa, the aim of this proposal is to characterise insecticide resistance in field populations of An. funestus in this region. The project encompasses three aims: Aim 1 is to assess the susceptibility status of An. funestus populations to main insecticide classes in different regions in Cameroon and neighbouring countries. Aim 2 is to characterise resistance mechanisms in An. funestus populations from Cameroon through target-site detection and microarray. Aim 3 is to assess and predict levels of gene flow between An. funestus populations in Central Africa using microsatellites and DNA sequence polymorphism analysis.

Amount: £103,795
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine

The aetiology of anaemia in HIV positive adults in Blantyre, Malawi: The contribution of anaemia of chronic disease and lymphoma. 20 Nov 2008

HIV affects one in seven of the population of Malawi; 19% of HIV+ve adults admitted to the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Blantyre have severe anaemia (Hb <8g/dl). Such patients have a high mortality during admission (28%), but survival increases with even modest improvements in anaemia. There are very few systematic studies of HIV related anaemia in Africa. A study in Malawi identified a primary cause of severe anaemia in 67% of HIV-infected adults. No cause for anaemia was identified in 33% of case s but as the study did not assess whether treatment lead to a resolution of anaemia, other aetiologies would have been missed. My hypotheses are i) that in adult populations with a high HIV seroprevalence, severe anaemia is often multi-factorial, and ii) that anaemia of chronic disease (ACD) and sub-clinical lymphomas are significant, but hitherto undiagnosed, causes of severe anaemia. State-of-the-art technologies (e.g. immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR, FISH) will be used to investigate all ca uses of severe anaemia, including those unresponsive to first line treatment, to identify multiple aetiologies. For the first time in Africa this study will utilise trephine biopsies to identify lymphoma and will examine the usefulness of serum erythropoietin in differentiating ACD from other causes of anaemia.

Amount: £476,979
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine

Learning & Training Extension to MLW Research Labs -reissue in dollars (exchange rate 1.988) -replace D record 18 Feb 2008

Since its inception in 1995 the Malawi-Liverpool-Wellcome (MLW) Programme has become an internationally recognised centre for research and research training. Malawi faces a disproportionate burden of serious health problems related to deprivation, a high prevalence of infectious disease and an over-stretched health infrastructure. Many of these health threats are potentially preventable or treatable. Attempts to tackle these threats are severely limited by the absence of a fundamental understand ing of disease process and the lack of diagnostic and interventional tools on which to base a comprehensive public health strategy. The origins, epidemiology and mechanisms of many of the underlying diseases remain unknown. There is an urgent need to identify and better understand the biological events, biomarkers, targets and disease pathways that will lead to the development of affordable diagnostic tools and therapeutic interventions. The MLW Programme therefore aims to: (1) Conduct biomedica l research on tropical health problems in a place where those problems occur; (2) Provide training in research skills for clinical and laboratory scientists both from the host country and abroad; (3) Strengthen the local institution (College of Medicine) in its capacity to conduct research on health problems of local importance.

Amount: £795,734
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine

Open access award. 22 Sep 2009

Not available

Amount: £30,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine

Surveillance for influenza in the context of pandemic H1N1 in an African population with a high burden of HIV, Malaria and Malnutrition. 30 Sep 2009

Sub-Saharan countries such as Malawi have a very high infectious disease burden. Although influenza is likely to be prevalent, there is little or no infrastructure to capture the contribution of influenza to morbidity and mortality or define the potential for pandemic influenza to be more severe in these frequently more immunocompromised populations. In this project we will: 1) Assess the burden of Influenza-like Illness (ILI) and Severe Acute Respiratory Infection (SARI) amongst adults and c hildren presenting to a large Central Hospital in Malawi and to determine the contribution of seasonal (including H3N2 and H1N1) and pandemic H1N1 influenza virus to this disease. 2) Describe the severity and outcome of laboratory proven seasonal and pandemic H1N1 influenza in a population with a high prevalence of HIV, malnutrition and malaria. 3) Determine the influence of HIV on the duration of shedding of seasonal and pandemic H1N1 influenza virus. 4) Document the frequency of secon dary invasive bacterial infections in adults and children with influenza-associated SARI. The findings that arise from this study will provide the detailed understanding of the epidemiology, clinical presentation and outcome of influenza urgently required by public health planners and policy makers in Africa.

Amount: £373,143
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine

The safety and efficacy of umbilical cord blood transfusion in severe malarialanaemia in children. 28 Mar 2008

Severe anemia in young children is a major public health problem in the malaria-endemic regions of Africa. Emergency blood transfusion can be a life-saving procedure in the management of these children, the majority of which are aged less than 12 months. Despite World Health Organisation recommendations, most hospitals rely on relative donation of blood for transfusion and in many cases blood is not available when required. I have demonstrated in a feasibility study that umbilical cord blood, which is otherwise discarded, can be collected in sufficient volumes on an African labour ward to be of use in the treatment of severe anaemia associated with malaria. If cord blood can be safely collected and screened in this setting, it could have a major impact on the management of severe malarial anaemia in children but also benefit other patient groups requiring scarce blood. This strategic research project aims to address the practical issues that need to be resolved before routine cord blood collection and transfusion can be recommended for wider application. These are: To demonstrate the minimum contamination rates with which umbilical cord blood can be collected in the African setting. To establish a safe, pragmatic and ethical screening strategy for transfusion transmissible infections in cord blood. To demonstrate the safety and efficacy of cord blood transfusion in the treatment of severe malarial anaemia in children. I aim to carry out this study at KEMRI/Wellcome Trust Unit, Kilifi, Kenya where there is the necessary paediatric and laboratory support and follow up mechanisms in the community are well established.

Amount: £31,578
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine

The role of von Willebrand Factor (VWF) in malaria pathogenesis. 16 Oct 2006

The pathogenicity of Plasmodium falciparum is thought to relate to the unique ability of infected erythrocytes to adhere to and subsequently activate the vascular endothelium. The primary process of cytoadherence has been studied in detail and a large number of receptors have been identified as being able to mediate binding of infected erythrocytes (IE). Host endothelia have differential receptor expression, for example cerebral endothelium has little or no CD36 which could influence parasite sequestration, limiting it to IE able to bind to other receptors. Recently however sequestration of IE to brain endothelium by CD36-binding variants has been demonstrated in paediatric cerebral malaria through bridging by platelets. Our recent work has shown that levels of von Willebrand factor (VWF) and its pro-peptide are elevated in malaria, indicating fulminant and specific endothelial activation and providing a mechanism for platelet accumulation on endothelium. The aims of this study ar e; i) To confirm the increased regulated expression of VWF in malaria. ii) To elucidate its potential role in the platelet bridging adhesion mechanism, including VWF multimerisation and proteolytic turnover. iii) To investigate the molecular mechanisms of VWF-mediated cytoadherence. iv) To examine its significance in paediatric disease.

Amount: £307,716
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine

Tackling insecticide resistance in the major African malaria vector Anopheles funestus: developing new molecular diagnostic tools, understanding the evolution of resistance and its impact on control interventions. 10 Jul 2013

Insecticide-based interventions, notably Indoor Residual Spraying (IRS) and Long Lasting Insecticide Nets (LLINs), are critical for malaria control in Africa. The recent rapid selection of resistance to the available insecticides classes in the major malaria vector Anopheles funestus across Africa is threatening the continued effectiveness of these control tools. The international community has now recognised that if suitable resistance management strategies to preserve the efficacy of current i nsecticides are not developed, this resistance will have devastating public health consequences. Unfortunately, important knowledge gaps on resistance (molecular basis, evolution and fitness cost) and the lack of adequate molecular tools to track resistance are preventing the design and implementation of suitable resistance mitigation strategies. To fill these gaps, I aim in this project to improve the control of An. funestus Africa-wide, by detecting molecular markers to track resistance, by el ucidating patterns of evolution and spread of resistance and assessing the fitness cost of resistance and its impact on control interventions. The project has three broad aims: Aim 1: To establish molecular markers and user-friendly diagnostic assays for pyrethroid, DDT and carbamate resistance and cross-resistance in An. funestus Africa-wide using Next-Generation Sequencing and functional analyses. Aim 2: To predict the evolution and spread of resistance by defining patterns of gene flow and se lective sweeps in field populations. Aim 3: To assess the fitness cost of resistance and its impact on control interventions using experimental huts trials. This project will benefit from the knowledge and tools generated during my Wellcome Trust Career Development Fellowship.

Amount: £1,855,897
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine

Investigating patterns of Pyrethroids and DDT resistance in Anopheles funestus populations in Benin: study of the distribution, resistance mechanisms and investigation on novel resistance management strategies. 26 Feb 2013

Malaria remains a major public health burden in Africa Malaria control relies heavily on insecticides-based vector control strategies. Unfortunately, the emergence of resistance to main insecticides is threatening the success of these strategies. In Benin, and its neighbouring west African countries, resistance to pyrethroids and DDT was mainly reported in An. gambiae while An. funestus, the other major malaria vector, was always considered to be susceptible and of less interest and attention to NMCP. However, our recent studies conducted in the southern Benin revealed the presence of pyrethroids and DDT resistance in populations of An. funestus. This recent discovery is prompting set of unanswered questions on

Amount: £279,258
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine

Core costs 18 Jan 2019

To support the work of the charity r.

Amount: £1,000
Funder: County Durham Community Foundation
Recipient: Royal British Legion

Pilot survey of medical history archives at Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine. 18 Mar 2007

Pilot survey of medical history archives at Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine

Amount: £11,350
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine

Ex vivo combined co-cultures of host cells, plasma and parasites isolated from patients: a new approach to cerebral malaria pathogenesis. 05 Dec 2006

The overall objective of this project is to analyse interactions between the different elements of the host (endothelium, plasma and platelets) and parasite present within brain post-capillary venules, and leading to the microvascular lesion during CM. For this, I will study the responsiveness of EC isolated from CM patients (post-mortem) to pro-inflammatory stimulation, compared to tissue-derived cells from non-fatal malaria patients (needle aspirate). In addition to endothelium, parasites will be isolated from all patients, and I will compare cytotoxicity levels among diagnostic groups. Thiswill be performed by measurement of endothelial alteration after cytoadherenceof parasite only, or clumped with platelets on human brain EC. Finally, I will set up a 'single patient' ex vivo model of CM pathogenesis by culturing EC, parasites and platelet-rich plasma isolated from the same patients. I willmeasure variations in endothelial permeability, electrical resistance and viability. By restricting in vitro bias, this model will allow more precise analysis of parameters involved in endothelial impairment in CM.

Amount: £275,473
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine

OPEN ACCESS. 30 Aug 2006

Not available

Amount: £10,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine