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Results

DSI - Debating Science Issues 13 Sep 2007

DSI - Debating Science Issues, is a dynamic debating competition which invites young people to engage in debate on the cultural, societal and ethical implications of advances in biomedical science. Open to students in the senior cycle of Irish Second Level Education (15-18) years), participating students take part in a series of 3 hour workshops which facilitate discussion and learning about biomedical science - from stem cell research to nanotechnology - in an informal round table forum. Providing an open and impartial environment, these workshops challenge students to think about the ethical and societal impact of biomedical research and stimulates them to learn more about this important area of research. This enthusiasm finds an outlet in the debating competition. Inspired by Wellcome Trust funded Debating Matters, DSI - Debating Sciences Issues is a dynamic, exciting and interactive debating model where debaters are challenged by judges, fellow students, teachers and audience members to defend their argument. Co-hosted by 4 Irish research centres and W5 in Belfast, DSI is what true debate is all about.

Amount: £29,560
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: National University of Ireland Galway

Early Irish female medical graduates, 1872-1922 27 May 2008

The primary aim of my project is to illuminate the history of the first women to qualify in medicine in Ireland in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The first female medical graduates in Ireland qualified with medical licences in 1877 from the King's and Queen's College of Physicians of Ireland, with the first 'lady' medical students matriculating at an Irish university (Queen's College Belfast) in 1889. I have chosen to begin the project in the early 1870s in order to examine the attitudes of the medical profession towards women entering the medical profession and analyse the discussions that led up to the opening of medical examinations to Irish women.

debating Science issues - DSI 16 Sep 2008

Debating Science Issues is a dynamic debating competition where young people are invited to engage in debate on the cultural, societal and ethical implications of advances in biomedical science. Open to senior cycle students of Irish Second Level Education (15-18 years of age), participating students partake in a series of 3 hour workshops teaching the fundamentals of biomedical science (including nanotechnology, stem cell research, genetically modified foods) and facilitating group discussion in an informal round table venue. Providing an open and impartial forum, the workshops challenge students to think about the ethical and societal impacts of biomedical research and stimulate them to delve more deeply into these important areas of research science. This enthusiasm finds an outlet in the debating competition. Inspired by Wellcome Trust funded Debating Matters, DSI is an exciting, interactive debating model where debaters are challenged by judges, peers, teachers, and audience members to defend their positions. Co-hosted by 4 Irish research centres and W5 in Belfast, DSI is a model of classical debate. In its first year, 432 students were involved in biomedical science workshops at 36 schools throughout Ireland. One Hundred One students were directly involved in the DSI debate process. Debating Science Issues is a dynamic debating competition where young people are invited to engage in debate on the cultural, societal and ethical implications of advances in biomedical science. Piloted in 2008, and fine-tuned through reflection on past practice and formal evaluation, DSI has evolved in scope and size.

Amount: £29,659
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: National University of Ireland Galway

Gender and the medical profession in Britain and Ireland c. 1800-1950. 30 Nov 2009

The main objective of this meeting is to explore the importance of gender as a mode of investigation within the history of medicine. This workshop will bring together historians of medicine from Ireland and the United Kingdom who are working on themes relating to gender and the medical profession in order to discuss most recent research that is being conducted within the field. Through the discussion of gendered themes relating to the history of medicine, participants will provide useful feedback to each other's' work in addition to focusing on the relevance of gender to modern research in the history of medicine. Another crucial aim is to provide for a useful networking opportunity for historians of medicine, in particular for those working in Ireland where the history of medicine is still a growing field of academic study. Additionally, through inviting members of the medical profession and academics working in related fields of history to attend, the workshop hopes to inform others of work being conducted in the area.

"Science and technology on the European Periphery" to be held at the National University of Ireland Galway on 17-20 June 2010 13 Apr 2010

Science and Technology on the European Periphery (STEP) is a network (rather than a society, it has no funding) which includes representatives from a wide range of European countries. Members' work focuses on countries other than Britain, Germany and France which arc traditionally viewed as the major players in the history of science. This meeting is the first to take place in Ireland and will particularly serve to incorporate Ireland's history of science, technology and medicine community into broader European networks. The meeting particularly encourages transnational comparisons. Previous STEP meetings have tended to be dominated by the history of physical sciences. The organizers have explicitly sought to involve historians of the biomedical sciences in this conference in order to make the group more inclusive and interdisciplinary. To this end, Professor Nick Jardine of Cambridge University has been confirmed as a plenary speaker. He will speak on natural history and peripheries in the nineteenth century. Papers on the history of medicine were solicited and form a significant component of the programme. We also wish to invite a second plenary speaker, Daniela Bleichmar (University of Southern California) to speak on the subject of colonial botany and eighteenth-century medicine.

Debating Science Issues. 07 Oct 2009

Debating Science Issues (DSI) is an exciting, interactive programme and debating competition where participants are invited to engage in debate and discussion on the cultural, societal and ethical implications of advances in biomedical science. Shareholders, including senior cycle students of Irish Second Level education (15 -18 years of age) partake in one of a series of 3 hour workshops teaching the fundamantals of biomedical science (including nanotechnology, stem cell research, genetically modified foods, immunisations, and health and self-testing diagnostic kits) and facilitating group discussion in an informal round table venue. Given the multi-disciplinary nature of biomedical science and the challenge to provide an open and impartial forum, the workshops are designed to inspire partisans to think about the ethical and societal impacts of biomedical research and stimulate them to delve more deeply into these important areas of research science. The DSI bioethical workshops will be offered through Education Centres throughout the Republic and Northern Ireland for the professional development of teachers, and for community groups such as Macra, womens' groups or groups at senior centres. Harnessing the enthusiasm gained, a dynamic debate will ensue amongst students from schools throughout the four provinces of Ireland. Debaters are challenged to defend their positions in front of judges, peers, teachers and audience members. Piloted in 2008, fine-tuned through reflection on past-practice and formal evaluation, and co-hosted by eight Irish research and discovery centres, DSI has evolved in scope and size for 2009-2010 with the addition of CLARITY in Dublin and Queen's University, Belfast.

Amount: £29,505
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: National University of Ireland Galway

Biomedical Vacation Scholarships 20 May 2011

Not available

Debating Science Issues 13 Oct 2010

Debating Science Issues (DSI) is a dynamic, cross-border competition where young people are invited to engage in debate and discussion on the cultural, societal and ethical implications of advances in biomedical science. Shareholders, including senior cycle students of Irish Second Level education (15 -18 years of age) partake in one of a series of 3 hour workshops teaching the fundamantals of biomedical science (including nanotechnology, stem cell research, genetically modified foods, immunisations, and health and self-testing diagnostic kits) and facilitating group discussion in an informal round table venue. Given the challenge to provide an open and impartial forum, the workshops are designed to inspire partisans to think about the ethical and societal impacts of biomedical research and stimulate them to delve more deeply into these important areas of science. Workshops will be offered through Education Centres throughout the Republic and Northern Ireland for the professional development of teachers. Showcasing DSI with the aim of empowering teachers with this topical, engaging project, we seek to have DSI incorporated into text books and curriculum guides. Harnessing the enthusiasm gained, a dynamic debate will ensue amongst students from schools throughout the four provinces of Ireland. Debaters are challenged to defend their positions in front of judges, peers, teachers and audience members. Piloted in 2007, fine-tuned through reflection on past-practice and formal evaluation, and co-hosted by seven Irish research centres and W5 and Queen's University Belfast, DSI has evolved in scope and breadth for 2010-2011 with the addition of CRANN at Trinity College Dublin.

Amount: £25,772
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: National University of Ireland Galway

Characterisation of the pharmacology of leelamine, and isolation and characterisation of related endogenous ligands. 22 Jun 2011

Leelamine, a novel diterpene, exhibits potent cannabinoid-like behavioural effects in mice, however its mechanism of action is currently unknown. We would like to characterise a leelamine receptor or binding site using [3H]leelamine in a radioligand binding assay in CB1 receptor knockout mice. This assay will then be used to screen for endogenous leelamine-like compounds in brain. Brain fractions will be separated using low and medium pressure, and normal phase and reverse phase, column chromat ography. The structure of active constituents will be identified using HPLC-MS and NMR. Any leelamine-like compound(s) will be assessed for its activity in the cannabinoid tetrad tests of hypomotility, antinociception, catalepsy, and hypothermia using mice. Overall, we would like to characterise a potentially new neurotransmitter receptor system in the brain, which may lead to new therapeutically useful targets, and the development of new drugs.

Amount: £328,471
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: National University of Ireland Galway

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship. 25 Jun 2012

Not available

Amount: £12,969
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: National University of Ireland Galway

Debating Science Issues (DSI) 30 Nov 2011

Not available

Amount: £30,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: National University of Ireland Galway

Vacation biomedical scholarship 24 Jun 2013

Not available

Amount: £21,240
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: National University of Ireland Galway

Assembly and function of Drosophila melanogaster centromeric chromatin during meiosis and development. 13 Nov 2012

Centromeres are key regions of eukaryotic chromosomes that ensure proper chromosome segregation at cell division. In most eukaryotes, centromere identity is defined epigenetically by the presence of a centromere-specific histone variant CenH3. How CenH3 is incorporated and reproducibly propagated during the cell cycle is key to understanding this essential epigenetic mechanism. Improper regulation of CenH3 assembly leads to hallmarks of cancer including the formation of extra centromeres, aberra nt segregation of chromosomes and aneuploidy. Recent studies in single cell eukaryotes or cultured cells have identified molecules critical for CenH3 assembly during the mitotic cell cycle, paving the way for investigations into the mechanisms that specify centromere identity, function and regulation in animals. Meiosis is an essential part of the reproductive cycle and chromosome segregation defects result in aneuploid eggs, sperm and resulting zygotes. However, in contrast to mitosis, the func tional requirements, cell cycle timing and regulation of CenH3 assembly in the specialised meiotic divisions are largely unknown. This proposal aims investigate the function and timing of CenH3 assembly during meiosis and early development in Drosophila melanogaster. A major goal is to uncover the contribution of centromeric chromatin to the maintenance of genome stability in meiotic and mitotic cells in multi-cellular animals.

Amount: £517,976
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: National University of Ireland Galway

Cell explorers a model for sustainable public engagement by third level institutions. 11 Jul 2013

Cell EXPLORERS is an exciting science engagement programme linking university and primary schools. It is the only programme in the West of Ireland to promote biological and biomedical sciences through a practical biology programme. Cell EXPLORERS stimulates interest and excitement through discovery learning in school visits and interactive workshops. The success of Cell EXPLORERS relies on its novel way of bringing teams of volunteer students and researchers to engage with the public in pract ical activities. Cell EXPLORERS has run as a successful pilot project and has been chosen to integrate the science outreach and public engagement programme of the highly research active NUI Galway School of Natural Sciences. This new stage of development will enable sustainable public engagement within SNS, by integrating staff engagement and enabling undergraduate student participation in science education. The objectives of this project are: 1. To develop a model that engages un dergraduate Biochemistry students in biomedical science communication and generates sustainable public engagement tools. This will contribute to the training of the next generation of science ambassadors and science educators. 2. Support formal learning by delivering schools workshops and creating a teacher training programme in collaboration with the Galway Education Centre Further development of Cell EXPLORERS at a larger scale will allow its future integration in the undergraduate curricu lum and its potential use as a STEM promotion model within Ireland and the UK.

Amount: £29,987
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: National University of Ireland Galway

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship 23 Jun 2014

Not available

Amount: £33,750
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: National University of Ireland Galway

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship 22 Jun 2015

Not available

Amount: £48,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: National University of Ireland Galway

'From a source of shame to the pride of the Island:' Disability, Advocacy & the Media in Ireland, 1959-2003. 12 May 2015

This project will examine the treatment and perception of the disabled community in Ireland during the period 1959-2003. Its objectives are fourfold. First, to provide the first detailed history of disability/disability provision in Ireland in this period. Second, to examine how the perception of the disabled changed, from viewing disability as indicative of divine will (necessitating seclusion from broader society), to the view that state policy must show an awareness of the need for self-regul ation and autonomy for members of the Disabled Community. Third, to unravel the impact of those changes in the development of the Irish state's system of disability provision, as the duty of care increasingly shifted towards state mechanisms of support and care. This led to the introduction of new systems of care, provided by the state, including disability benefit and the carer's allowance, fundamentally changing the level of state intervention in their lives. Finally, to provide an insight int o how community integration became the standard mode of disability care and how the current system of state provision for the disabled came into being. Thus, the central research questions will be around what shaped and catalysed change to the care systems for the disabled in Ireland?

Amount: £81,095
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: National University of Ireland Galway

Assessment of the association of FOXP3 positive tumour infiltrating lymphocytes with therapeutic response in triple negative breast cancer. 01 Apr 2016

Tumour infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) have been shown to be associated with a positive therapeutic response in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). However TILs can have both pro-tumour and anti-tumour properties. It is thought that FOXP3 expression in TILs can downregulate their ability to target and inhibit tumour cells. In this proposed summer project, we will assess the levels of TILs in a cohort of 383 patients with triple negative breast cancer who specimens are arrayed on a tissue microarray. The cohort includes 100 cases treated with neoadjuvant therapy and 283 with adjuvant therapy. We will further assess the phenotype of the TILs using FOXP3 immunohistochemistry to determine the levels of FOXP3 positive TILs in TNBCs. We will then correlate TILs and FOXP3+TILs with histological subtype, tumour stage at diagnosis, tumour grade at diagnosis using logistic regression and chi square analysis. Additionally we will assess the ability of TILs and FOXP3+TILs to predict response to adjuvant therapy, and assess if tumours with which did not respond to neoadjuvant therapy possess increased levels of FOXP3+TILs.

Investigating the role of intronic polymorphisms in NRG1 and DIRC3 in breast cancer predisposition 01 Apr 2016

Multiple genetic loci are associated with breast cancer, although only a small proportion are individually associated with a high relative risk of disease. Only a minority of the risk of familial breast cancer is explained by mutations in single genes. It is hypothesised that the remaining heritability of breast cancer may be attributed to the cumulative contribution of a number of low-risk variants. This risk may also be modified by environmental and hormonal factors. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) refer to DNA sequence variation at one base pair between paired alleles in an individual or between two individuals. There are approximately ten million SNPs in the human genome, occurring with a frequency of one per 300 nucleotides.The majority are benign, but they may become pathogenic if they occur in a critical coding or regulatory region. The aim of this study is to investigate the frequency of intronic single nucleotide polymorphisms in NRG1 (Neuregilin 1) and DIRC3 (Disrupted in Renal Cancer 3) in a cohort of Irish patients with breast cancer, and to evaluate their association with disease.