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Results

Vacation Scholarships 2008. 27 May 2008

Not available

Amount: £10,640
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: St George's University of London

Value in People Award. 17 Oct 2007

Not available

Amount: £250,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: St George's University of London

Student Elective Prize for Mr Tharindu Bandara 29 Aug 2008

The burden of Metabolic Syndrome in patients with stages 3-5 CKD between an urban and a rural population in Chandigarh, India

Amount: £1,600
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: St George's University of London

Student Elective Prize for Mr Rickey Raja 29 Aug 2008

The burden of Metabolic Syndrome in patients with stages 3-5 CKD between an urban and a rural population in Chandigarh, India

Amount: £1,600
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: St George's University of London

Student Elective Prize for Ms Chiara Morrison 29 Aug 2008

''Is podoconiosis associated with decreased lung function (restrictive or obstructive pattern)?''

Amount: £1,531
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: St George's University of London

Student Elective Prize for Ms Emily Burridge 29 Aug 2008

'Is podoconiosis associated with decreased lung function (restrictive or obstructive pattern)?''

Amount: £1,531
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: St George's University of London

Cryptococcal antigen screening and targeted pre-emptive therapy in patients initiating ART: a prospective cohort study. 14 Jun 2011

Cryptococcal meningitis is a leading cause of death in HIV-infected patients in the developing world. Many patients continue to present late for antiretroviral treatment (ART), and many die just before and after starting therapy. Cryptococcal meningitis causes many of these early deaths. However, many cases of cryptococcal meningitis may be preventable. Routine screening for serum cryptococcal antigen (CRAG), indicating sub-clinical infection, can identify the 10% of patients with CD4+ cells

Amount: £386,695
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: St George's University of London

Open Access Block Grant 2016/17 30 Sep 2016

Not available

Amount: £7,899
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: St George's University of London

Turnover, differentiation and senescence of CD8 memory T cells in vivo 05 Oct 2010

This proposal employs high-resolution modifications of several elegant techniques to examine whether CD57+ memory T-cells are truly senescent. The techniques employed include in vivo stable isotope labelling of human subjects with deuterated water, state-of-the-art multiparameter flow cytometric sorting, and T-cell clonotyping. Recent refinements to these techniques now allow reliable measurements from very low numbers of cells. Therefore, it is now possible to take full advantage of the power o f multiparameter, multidirectional fluorescence-activated cell sorting to simultaneously measure the kinetics of multiple, even rare, subpopulations of cells, including memory CD57+ CD8+ T-cells that are infrequent in healthy subjects. The key goal of this proposal is to reveal whether CD57+ CD8+ T-cells as well as antigen-specific CD57+ CD8+ T-cells accumulate in chronic infections because of increased proliferation or because of phenotypic conversion from a precursor memory T-cell subset. This information will help to illuminate the ontogeny and significance of memory CD57+ CD8+ T-cells and determine the impact of specific antigen-driven processes in the generation and maintenance of this enigmatic memory T-cell subset.

Amount: £53,397
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: St George's University of London

Regulation of hnRNP K and 4E-BP1 in response to DNA damage. 10 Jul 2007

This collaborative project will investigate mechanisms regulating the stability and functions of two proteins involved in a network of transcriptional and translational control during the cellular stress response to DNA damage. The proteins in question are the DNA-and RNA-binding protein heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNPK) and the translational regulatory factor eIF4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1). Current evidence indicatesthat the phosphorylation of hnRNPK is enhanced, and that of 4E-BP1 decreased, during the DNA damage response. Both proteins are substrates for ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation and their stability is increased by DNA damage. Our preliminary data suggest that ATM-dependent phosphorylation of hnRNPK and mTOR-dependent phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 have opposite effects on ubiquitination, resulting in a coordinated inhibitory effect on the turnover of the two proteins. Key goals will therefore be to investigate the phosphorylation events critical for the ubiquitination of hnRNP K and 4E-BP1, characterise the ubiquitin ligase(s) that modify 4E-BP1, and study the consequences of ubiquitination of the two proteins for their stability and role in the DNA damage response. We will also analyse the mechanisms by which DNA damage controls the pathways involved and will investigate the regulatory network involving hnRNPK and 4E-BP1 that centres onthe translation factor eIF4E.

Amount: £226,826
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: St George's University of London

What are the consequences for the immune system of persistent antigen stimulation by cytomegalovirus? 24 Apr 2007

CMV has a major impact on the human immune system, generating very high frequencies of antigen specific CD4 and CD8 T cells. CMV-seropositivity is also a component of the immune risk phenotype and is predictive of poor survival in elderly individuals. In this proposal we will determine whether CMV-specific immune responses differ from those to antigens that are only intermittently present, in T cell kinetics, in the type of effector cells generated and in the rate of turnover of responding T cell clones. We will also determine how great is the extent of contraction of the T cell repertoire in elderly CMV-seropositive and seronegative donors. Finally we shall determine whether the titre and avidityof anti-CMV antibody alter in the elderly and whether a large fraction of memory B cells are directed toward CMV antigens, as is the case for T cells. These data will throw light on the mechanisms by which CMV alters immune function in the elderly.

Amount: £93,700
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: St George's University of London

Assessing the preservation and conservation needs of the archival and historical collection of St George's Medical School. 29 Aug 2014

The purpose of this application is, following a visit from the Wellcome Research Resources team, to set up a scoping project using two external advisors to assess the content and condition of the St George's Medical School archival collection. The funding applied for will be used to pay for two advisors, an archivist and a conservator to appraise the collection and write reports and make recommendations of how the collection should be managed and looked after. The diverse collections of material cover the history of the medical school and its connections with St George's Hospital. There is increasing interest in this collection and this project would enable us to identify the component parts of the collection and to establish preservation and conservation requirements. This seeping project will also enable us to gain a better understanding of the collections and develop a strategy for cataloguing and preservation, with the ultimate aim of the archives being available for use by the academic community, researchers and medical historians.

Amount: £8,036
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: St George's University of London

Value in People Award. 18 Jul 2007

Not available

Amount: £200,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: St George's University of London

Student elective for Mark Lawrence 19 Jul 2006

Characterisation of sensory neurons produced by pluripotent mouse neural crest-like stem cells The regulation of cell determination is a central issue in developmental biology. There has been much recent interest in postnatal stem cells and their unexpectedly broad differentiation capacity because of the potential therapeutic implications. We established from neonatal mouse skin three immortal, pluripotent stem cell lines that resemble neural crest stem cells and are capable of producing at least three cell lineages (melanoblasts/melanocytes, neurons and Schwann precursor cells).They promise to be valuable tools for study of cell determination. Neuronal differentiation of these cell lines is the least well characterised. We plan to expose pluripotent neural crest-like stem cells to growth/differentiation factors known to control determination of sensory neurons in short-term cultures: brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophic factor (NT3), fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) and nerve growth factor (NGF). We have preliminary data showing that in the presence of these factors very long bipolar neuron-like cells and large, dendritic cells resembling sensory neurons appear in the cultures. The student will repeat and confirm these observations, analysing and recording changes of cell morphology using photo microscopy. He will also study effect of these factors on cell proliferation by counting cell numbers before and some time after growing the cells in the presence of these growth actors by haemocytometer. To test whether morphologically different cells are indeed sensory neurons he will perform immunocytochemical analysis of these cells by using a marker of sensory neurons (substance P) and neuronal markers (neuronal tubulin beta 3 and a neurofilament subunit).

Amount: £1,600
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: St George's University of London

Student electives for Cemile Kalkan and Randal Stronge. 19 Jul 2006

Characterisation of sensory neurons produced by pluripotent mouse neural crest-like stem cells The regulation of cell determination is a central issue in developmental biology. There has been much recent interest in postnatal stem cells and their unexpectedly broad differentiation capacity because of the potential therapeutic implications. We established from neonatal mouse skin three immortal, pluripotent stem cell lines that resemble neural crest stem cells and are capable of producing at least three cell lineages (melanoblasts/melanocytes, neurons and Schwann precursor cells).They promise to be valuable tools for study of cell determination. Neuronal differentiation of these cell lines is the least well characterised. We plan to expose pluripotent neural crest-like stem cells to growth/differentiation factors known to control determination of sensory neurons in short-term cultures: brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophic factor (NT3), fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) and nerve growth factor (NGF). We have preliminary data showing that in the presence of these factors very long bipolar neuron-like cells and large, dendritic cells resembling sensory neurons appear in the cultures. The student will repeat and confirm these observations, analysing and recording changes of cell morphology using photo microscopy. He will also study effect of these factors on cell proliferation by counting cell numbers before and some time after growing the cells in the presence of these growth actors by haemocytometer. To test whether morphologically different cells are indeed sensory neurons he will perform immunocytochemical analysis of these cells by using a marker of sensory neurons (substance P) and neuronal markers (neuronal tubulin beta 3 and a neurofilament subunit).

Amount: £2,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: St George's University of London

Open access award. 21 Sep 2010

Not available

Amount: £45,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: St George's University of London

The Functional Genomics Cell Bank at St George's: extension of activities. 11 Jun 2015

Support is sought for the maintenance and further development of the [Wellcome Trust] Functional Genomics Cell Bank. This unique resource, established with the Trust's support, holds a large collection of mammalian cell lines, especially lines of mouse melanocytes (pigment cells) and melanoblasts carrying congenic pigmentary mutations. The melanocytic lineage is invaluable as a genetic model, because of the rich genetic resources of many defined murine coat-colour mutations, and their human homo logous loci. The Bank provides immortal melanocytes to hundreds of institutions worldwide. The cells are used to study the actions of the mutated genes, which affect many body systems besides pigmentation, thus fostering research widely relevant to human and animal health. The key objectives are: to preserve and expand the Bank's genetic resources, of incalculable value; and to continue and expand its other services. We will provide on request cells, advice and training in specialized culture techniques, and derivatives such as DNA. We will increase publicity and information about the Bank. We will establish further mutant melanocyte lines of specific current research interest, and will employ our specialized skills to collaborate with users where it will facilitate their research.

Amount: £299,570
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: St George's University of London

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship 24 Jun 2013

Not available

Amount: £1,520
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: St George's University of London