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Results

LifeLines 20 Apr 2016

This is the expansion of a project supporting volunteers aged 50 plus to run activities for vulnerable older people to improve health and well-being. These have previously included art classes, creative writing, yoga and computer club. The group will expand across the city, recruiting more volunteers, supporting more than 800 new people and establishing a Men’s Network to encourage older men to socialise regularly. It will also extend its HealthLink scheme to help older people get to medical appointments.

Kilkeel RBL - Saving Our Community Venue 22 Oct 2015

The group is a community and voluntary based organisation providing a range of services and activities to the local community. They received a grant of £10,000 to make improvements to their venue so that it can be used for more classes and activities.

Grant to Royal British Legion Tipton Branch 19 May 2016

Remembering Tipton's World War One Heroes

Grant awarded to The Royal British Legion (Forest Hall) Branch And Club (Tyne & Wear) 20 Nov 1998

Towards improving access and facilities for disabled people at the Forest Hall Ex-Servicemen's Institute.

Grant awarded to Community Service Volunteers (Training and Enterprise NE) (Tyne & Wear) 13 Jul 2004

To provide daycare services to older people living in high rise flats in Newcastle.

Thomas Hardy and Biology: Character, Culture and Environment, 1859-1928. 08 Jun 2011

Hardy was deeply interested in Victorian scientific and medical questions, listing among the thinkers who had most influenced him Charles Darwin, T.H.Huxley and Herbert Spencer, and taking notes from Darwin, Galton, Eduard von Hartmann, Huxley, George Henry Lewes, Maudsley, George Romanes, Spencer and August Weismann. Examining his notebooks, correspondence, fiction and poetry, I will also consider his meetings and correspondence with physicians, psychiatrists, eugenists and degenerationists ( including Crichton-Browne and C.W. Saleeby), as well as his critical reception, including the interest in his work by, for example, the sexologist Havelock Ellis. The first key goal of the research is to demonstrate the extent to which Hardy explored in his fiction the ideas which contemporary scientists were researching and debating, on the physical basis of mind, the relation of psychology and physiology, the unconscious, the physiological basis of the emotions, psychological differences be tween humans and animals, the role of instincts in the development of the moral sense, and evolutionary and medical ideas about war. The second key goal is to shed new light on Hardy's novels. The third key goal is to ask what antecedents there are in Hardy's fiction for postgenomic science and medicine.

Amount: £31,475
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

"Darwin, Medicine and the Humanities symposium" to be held in Exeter on 18th and 19th September 2009 21 Apr 2009

The symposium has four main objectives. Firstly, to identify key new research on Darwin and the history of medicine; secondly, to bring together new and established scholars across disciplines and from both sides of the Atlantic to open up and develop new research questions on the significance of Darwin to the history of medicine; thirdly, to engage with and develop new methodologies and research insights from a range of disciplines and foster ongoing constructive collaborations; and finally to link up with Darwin-related outreach activities in the South West which have been initiated this year in celebration of the bicentenary of Darwin's birth. The symposium will seek to involve younger and new scholars, possibly at the beginning of their academic careers. To support this involvement up to four bursaries will be offered to doctoral or postdoctoral students working in relevant areas. A journal publication of papers from the symposium is planned, and it is hoped that work from bursary-supported students will be included.

Amount: £4,800
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

Improving Psychological interventions for Mood Disorder: A translational research approach. 18 Jul 2008

The next generation of psychological treatments must directly target improved outcomes and increased availability for difficult-to-treat psychiatric patients. To accomplish this, a better understanding is required of the cognitive and emotional mechanisms causally involved in the onset and maintenance of mood disorders and of the mechanisms of change associated with effective treatments. Further, innovative and effective ways to deliver cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) to mood disorders need to be established. Accomplishing these objectives will require infrastructure support for collaborative research teams that have established experience in the testing, development, and integration of translational research findings. The Mood Disorders Centre (MDC) is uniquely positioned to be able to accomplish these aims: The MDC has an excellent track record in both experimental and clinical trial research in mood disorders, and has recently recruited international experts who bring experience in translational research paradigms and personality disorders. However, the MDC has outgrown its current facilities. This proposal will develop the MDC's internationally competitive leading-edge research through the provision of (1) a fit-for-purpose Biobehavioural and Virtual Reality Laboratory and (2) a dedicated and specialized Research Clinic. This infrastructure will support the following key objectives: (a) extending MDC research programmes investigating the mechanisms of dysfunctional and disordered affect by adding behavioural laboratory, psychophysiological, neural imaging, and virtual reality technologies to the portfolio of research methodologies, (b) the conduct of large-scale clinical trials to improve the efficacy and accessibility of psychological treatments, and (c) developing and testing novel treatments (e.g., cognitive bias modification, extinction and learning reminders).

Amount: £3,605,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

MA History of Medicine 29 Aug 2008

Not available

Amount: £21,442
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

Environments, expertise and experience: the transmission and boundaries of medical knowledge and practice. 21 Jul 2009

Our key objective is to expand and sustain a critical mass of researchers exploring three inter-related themes. 1. Environments, bodies and boundaries. Research will focus on the impact of domestic, occupational, and urban environments on medical understandings and patient experiences of disease. Revolving partly around research on stress, this strand will also focus on `sick building syndrome', child health, and the relationship between environmental change and health. 2. Sexual knowled ge, sexual experiences and health. This strand explores theories of sexuality, sexual practice and health from ancient to modern worlds. It encompasses projects on impotence and infertility, bodies, sex and health, and how representations of sexual practices in `other historical contexts have shaped modern debates. 3. Transmission and boundaries of medical knowledge. Much of our research analyses the construction and transmission of medical knowledge across time and space and exchanges betw een expert understandings and lay experiences of disease. We aim to develop these themes into a designated strand that encompasses work on the reception and dissemination of Galen s physiology and research on the cultural history of heredity. Seminars, joint conferences, staff exchange schemes and collaborative research projects will be used to disseminate research findings, strengthen international links, and facilitate comparative research.

Amount: £30,805
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

Rewriting the System of Nature: Linnaeus's Use of Writing Technologies. 13 Nov 2008

Although the cultural turn in the history of science and medicine has considerably raised awareness for the contextual importance of material artefacts and practices, medical and scientific knowledge itself is still largely seen as something which is exemplified by cognitive entities: the concepts, theories, and methodologies that scientists hold and use. This project would start from a different perspective by assuming that any form of socially organized knowledge is essentially written knowled ge, and proceeds through the development, deployment and dissemination of writing technologies. While the project focuses on the corpus of manuscripts and publications of a single scientist, Carl Linnaeus (1707 1778), I conceive it as a pilot project that will serve to develop both a terminology and a methodology that is attentive to the materiality of writing, and will have ramifications for how the history of science and medicine is done in general. In particular, it will bring historiography closer again to the defining mark of modern science and medicine: their reliance on forms of inductive reasoning operating on a social and global scale, and the concurrent emergence of ontological concepts of collective entities like species, disease categories, and human types .

Amount: £119,746
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter
Amount: £76,508
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

"Stress, shock and adaptation in the twentieth century" to be held in Exeter NLM and NIH on 9-10 November 2010 31 Aug 2010

This workshop will explore what happens when the concept of "stress" enters into medical discourse and policy. While there have long been associations made between modernity and illness, the concept of stress has intensified and refocused such debates. No longer restricted to maladapted individuals and groups, the problem of stress is shared by all, becoming the most widely utilized medical concept in the twentieth century. In this workshop we will be exploring the scientific, intellectual and political decisions underlying the emergence of the stress concept; its uses in making novel linkages between disciplines such as ecology, neurology, physiology, psychiatry, public health, and a range of social sciences; and its application in a variety of sites or places, such as the battlefield, the office-building, the transport system, the hospital, and home. The workshop will bring together leading historians of science and medicine, exploring many different perspectives on stress - from scientists and physicians, to health activists, urban planning and environmental design professions, industry, policy makers, and regulators. The very diversity of .conceptions and varied applications of "stress," ensures its value as a means of exploring how social, political, and economic concerns have shaped the production and application of scientific knowledge.

Amount: £5,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

"Human heredity in the twentieth century" to be held at the University of Exeter on 2-4 September 2010 15 Feb 2010

The idea that physical and mental characters can be attributed to discrete hereditary factors or "genes" has profoundly affected our understanding of human nature and society. The perceived social implications of genetic knowledge have, in turn, had a profound effect on the development of scientific methods, concepts, theories and technologies. Modern knowledge about human heredity, however, does not only stem from the discipline of genetics. Various fields such as medicine, anthropology, and psychology have maintained and developed their own ways of analysing and explaining the phenomena of heredity through technologies such as intelligence testing, surveys of fertility, patterns of disease, blood groups and linguistic boundaries. The workshop will produce a much needed and comprehensive picture of the various scientific, medical and political practices that have shaped the notion of human heredity from 1900 to the mid-1970s (when new biotechnologies opened up a new age of human heredity). It will focus on developments that have hitherto attracted little attention in the historiography of human heredity, and which shed new light on the interaction between science and society and on the transfer of knowledge and practices between scientific fields.

Amount: £5,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

"On balance: an interdisciplinary conference on notions of balance and stability in health and medicine" to be held on 12-13 May 2010 at the University of Exeter 15 Feb 2010

The immediate aim of this conference is to bring together scholars from a range of disciplines in order to reflect on and interrogate the role of concepts such as balance and stability in debates about health and disease, both in historical and modern cultural terms. Our purpose is to include studies that relate to all periods and places, including Western and Eastern theories and treatments of disease and from ancient through to modern formulations of balance and health. As longer term goals, we intend both to publish the proceedings of the conference in some form and to develop an ambitious inter-disciplinary research programme on the medical, political and personal implications of the notion of balance within medicine.

Amount: £5,331
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

First European Advanced Seminar in Philosophy of Life Sciences" to be held on 6-10 September 2010 at Hermance 20 Oct 2009

This is the first of a planned series of biennial meetings of senior scholars and research students from six major research centres in the philosophy of the life sciences and medicine across Europe. The aims of this series are: (1) to acquaint young researchers with recent trends in their own and neighbouring disciplines and allow them to network in an early stage of their career; (2) to facilitate exchange of young researchers among the institutions involved and potentially enhance the institutional research scope; and (3) to create a platform for more senior scientists to develop new programs and projects on a European level.

Amount: £4,500
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

Mechanisms of persistence of B. pseudomallei. 24 Apr 2008

Melioidosis, caused by the Gram negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, is an often fatal disease of humans and animals. Human melioidosis is characterised by a profound difficulty in eradicating the pathogen either via the immune response or by antibiotics. Our hypothesis is that the ability of B. pseudomallei to establish a persistentinfection is central to the inefficiency of current antibiotic treatment, the susceptibility of individuals to re-infection and the difficulties associated with vaccine development. If the molecular basis of persistent infection was understood this would allow new pretreatments, therapies and diagnostics for melioidosis to be established and would address fundamental questions in the biology of persistent infection caused by bacteria. Our aims are to; i) Identify B. pseudomallei genes associated with chronic disease in humans and in mice ii) identify B. pseudomallei genes associated with the appearance of metabolically inactive (persister) cells in vitro which are resistant to antibiotics iii) construct bacterial mutants lacking genes identified in Aims 1&2 and assess their virulence and susceptibility to antibiotic treatment in a murine model of infection iv) investigate ways in which chronic or persistent infection might be more effectively controlled by antibiotics

Amount: £259,794
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

The Medical World of Early Modern England, Wales and Ireland, c. 1500-1715. 31 Jan 2012

This project will develop and make public a groundbreaking database with biographies of all medical practitioners active in England, Wales and Ireland c.1500-1715, which will then be used to produce the first all-round study of the nature and impact of medical practice in early modern Britain, to be published as a major monograph by a leading university press. The database will build on a prototype already created by Dr Peter Elmer, a senior researcher on the project (which already includes much of the necessary coverage for England, and some material for Wales and Ireland), to which will be added information from existing databases of other scholars, notably Dr Margaret Pelling, and from family and local history groups. Research assistants with expertise in Welsh and Irish sources/languages will be employed to ensure full coverage of those countries. The database (hosted initially by the Centre for Medical History (CMH) at Exeter) will be developed as a permanent online resource, link ed to other existing online resources, with the facility for others to add to the database under controlled arrangements. The project researchers, together with other CMH staff (directed by Professor Barry), will analyse the data on medical practitioners to produce the first comprehensive analysis of early modern British medical practitioners. This will explore not only their education, career patterns and medical activities, but also their major contribution to science, the arts, business, reli gious and political thought, revealing the key contribution of medical practitioners to the revolutionary changes in Britains place in the world.

Amount: £923,122
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

Open access award 2012/13. 17 Sep 2012

Not available

Amount: £50,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

Prisoners as patients: Homosexuality and same-sex desire in German prisoner of war camps in the United States during World War II 19 Oct 2010

The project will study the experience of German soldiers who were caught in sexual activities with other prisoners while in captivity in the United States during World War II. The U.S. Army considered these prisoners 'sexual psychopaths' and ordered that they should be transferred to hospitals for treatment if deemed 'reclaimable'. Nothing has so far been written about these prisoners and little is known about their experience. The key goal of this project is to change that by locating primary sources dealing with this little known chapter of World War II history and by publishing the results in a journal article.

Amount: £1,370
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter