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Results

LifeLines 20 Apr 2016

This is the expansion of a project supporting volunteers aged 50 plus to run activities for vulnerable older people to improve health and well-being. These have previously included art classes, creative writing, yoga and computer club. The group will expand across the city, recruiting more volunteers, supporting more than 800 new people and establishing a Men’s Network to encourage older men to socialise regularly. It will also extend its HealthLink scheme to help older people get to medical appointments.

Kilkeel RBL - Saving Our Community Venue 22 Oct 2015

The group is a community and voluntary based organisation providing a range of services and activities to the local community. They received a grant of £10,000 to make improvements to their venue so that it can be used for more classes and activities.

Grant to Royal British Legion Tipton Branch 19 May 2016

Remembering Tipton's World War One Heroes

Grant awarded to The Royal British Legion (Forest Hall) Branch And Club (Tyne & Wear) 20 Nov 1998

Towards improving access and facilities for disabled people at the Forest Hall Ex-Servicemen's Institute.

Grant awarded to Community Service Volunteers (Training and Enterprise NE) (Tyne & Wear) 13 Jul 2004

To provide daycare services to older people living in high rise flats in Newcastle.

Sheffield Human 3T MR Imaging & Spectroscopy Facility. 03 Mar 2011

Part capital-funding for a whole-body, human, in-vivo, superconducting Magnetic Resonance (MR) research system is required to provide a continued, sustainable, leading-edge, multi-nuclear, 3T MR imaging resource based in Sheffield. This equipment will facilitate ongoing and novel investigations. Current key areas of application include: a) clinical neuroimaging - cerebrovascular dysfunction in diabetes - CNS pain matrix associated with chronic neuropathies - schizophrenia fMRI correlates of auditory hallucinations, cognitive status and therapeutic intervention - neuro-oncology lesion characterization - neurodegenerative diseases such as the ataxias and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (emphasis on therapy monitoring) - metal ion exposure sequalae of hip-implant resurfacing - computational neuro-modeling for clinical decision support b) basic science fMRI neuro- - emotion and executive function, notably in dramatic arts - musical rhythm performance - mathematical process ing - mistruths c) Inhaled hyperpolarized 3-He and 129-Xe lung imaging with simultaneous multi-nuclear excitation d) Hyperpolarized 129-Xe labeling and 1-H imaging for linked cardiac and brain perfusion assessment We also aim to conjoin imaging measures of CNS, heart and lung status and function. Provision of state-of-the-art imaging equipment will help to drive and facilitate other areas of research, in particular, in-vivo monitoring following translational research / novel interventi ons, including those developed in the part-Wellcome-funded Medical School.

Amount: £1,000,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Sheffield

Understanding epilepsy in the active brain. 07 Oct 2010

Neuroimaging techniques (like functional magnetic resonance imaging; fMRI) are increasingly being used to localise epileptic foci in partial epilepsy as part of pre-surgical evaluation and decision making. However, neuroimaging techniques rely on indirect measures of neural activity afforded by accompanying changes in hemodynamic parameters and we have very little understanding of how the relationship between neural activity and hemodynamics (neurovascular coupling) is affected by the epileptic state: something crucial for interpreting neuroimaging data in epilepsy. The proposed studies will use a variety of techniques in an animal model of partial epilepsy to characterise, define and measure the hemodynamic and neural events underlying epileptic activity. We will also assess whether any long term changes to normal neurovascular coupling mechanisms persist after epileptic activity, and whether antiepileptic medication can restore normal neurovascular coupling relationships. This resear ch will develop the use of neuroimaging (in particular fMRI) as a tool for pre-surgical localization of epileptic foci in cortical partial epilepsy and ultimately improve outcomes for surgical interventions in human epilepsy patients.

Amount: £385,713
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Sheffield

Biomedical vacation scholarship. 29 May 2009

Not available

Amount: £8,280
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Sheffield

Sheffield RNAi Screening Centre. 10 Jul 2008

The discovery of the RNAi effect and its application both in cultured cells and in vivo has revolutionised the field of reverse genetics. For the first time systematic genome-wide approaches can feasibly be undertaken to investigate the consequences of knocking down expression of essentially every gene. Using a range of assays including luminometry and high-content imaging, genome wide RNAi screens can identify loci whose products are involved in a wide range of biological processes. This appl ication aims to set up the first stage of a centre to allow whole genome RNAi screening to be made available at low cost to a wide scientific community. Using a second generation in silico optimized library of dsRNA in cultured cells, as well as a subset of a recently developed in vivo library, we will develop and make available a resource to rapidly and cost effectively undertake genome wide screens. This will use Drosophila as a low complexity, RNAi tractable, gateway to provide starting point s by which to better understand higher complexity vertebrate systems. It is planned to establish and trial this centre locally before ultimately opening it to the wider UK scientific community.

Amount: £916,912
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Sheffield

Open Access Award. 16 Sep 2008

Not available

Amount: £30,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Sheffield

The molecular mechanism of active nucleoside transport across biological membranes. 22 Apr 2010

Nucleoside transporters are essential for the salvage synthesis of nucleotides by many cell types, and for the efficient uptake of hydrophilic nucleoside drugs. By regulating the extracellular concentrations of adenosine and other nucleosides, they also modulate numerous physiological processes, ranging from cardiovascular activity to lipolysis. Elucidating their molecular mechanisms is therefore not only crucial for a fuller understanding of nucleoside biology, but should also underpin the deve lopment of novel therapeutic strategies for human disease. Towards this end, the key goals of the proposed research are: [1] To elucidate the structures of bacterial representatives of the ubiquitous concentrative nucleoside transporter (CNT) family, in particular NupC from Escherichia coli. 2-D and 3-D crystallography of NupC will exploit the availability of large amounts of wild-type and conformationally locked mutant proteins. [2] In parallel to investigate helix arrangements and dynamics in NupC by non-crystallographic approaches, including Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and thiol cross-linking. [3] To perform complementary investigations on homologous sodium- and proton-linked CNTs from humans to elucidate the mechanisms underlying nucleoside selectivity, cation-coupling, and conformational changes. [4] To attempt the production of human CNTs in amounts sufficient for structural investigations, exploiting recent advances in high-throughput methods for screening euk aryote membrane protein expression.

Amount: £260,227
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Sheffield

How and when are bacterial flagellins glycosylated? 01 Oct 2009

Post-translational modification of proteins was not thought to occur in bacteria. Recently there have been a number of reports about bacterial protein glycosylation. Interestingly most bacterial glycoproteins are involved in pathogenesis or they are surface exposed/polymeric protein structures such as flagella or pili. Glycosylation appears to be a fundamental aspect of flagellar assembly however it may also serve specific roles in infection and pathogenesis. Nothing is known about when the gly can is transferred onto flagellin during the filament assembly process. We aim to establish whether this occurs before interaction with chaperones or recognises chaperone-subsunit complexes during passage to the export apparatus. We believe this process occurs via the members of the Maf protein family. Therefore we wish to investigate the interaction of this family of proteins with the flagellin or flagellin specific chaperones and determine whether glycosylation is required for entry into the f lagella export pathway or to ensure polymerization of a functional flagellum. Other questions to be investigated include identification of he glycosylation sites and to establish the minimum amount of glycosylation required for filament assembly.

Amount: £184,992
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Sheffield

Student Elective Prize for Mr Ugochukwu Ihekwaba 29 Aug 2008

The correlations of Outcome from Herpes Simplex Virus Infections of the Central Nervous System with Virus Load as Determined by Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)

Amount: £1,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Sheffield

Analysis of the role of the Pex1 complex on peroxisome stability 06 Oct 2011

The goal of my research is to dissect the molecular events that underlie transport of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane constituents to peroxisomes. My working hypothesis is that Pex3 is first inserted into the ER membrane, where it is concentrated into a subdomain, followed by release in the form of a membranous carrier that subsequently fuses with peroxisomes. I use Saccharomyces cerevisiae as model system but I will also explore Drosophila S2 cells as a higher eukaryotic model system to s tudy these transport events. We have recently developed novel assays to follow peroxisome multiplication and ER-to-peroxisome transport. These assays allow us to study the ER-to-peroxisome transport pathway more easily and to analyse the role of candidate proteins in this pathway. I will use a combination of genetics, biochemical approaches, immuno-gold electron microscopy, live-cell imaging and time lapse microscopy to achieve my objectives: 1) morphological description of the transport inter mediates 2) identification and characterisation of factors involved in the ER-to-peroxisome transport. 3) characterisation of the signals in Pex3 that are required at each stage of its intracellular itinery, 4) identification of additional proteins that follow the same Pex3 route.

Amount: £110,868
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Sheffield

A randomised controlled trial of the 'Health in Early Feeding Scheme' to improve breastfeeding in neighbourhoods with low 6 week breastfeeding rates. 07 Nov 2011

Breastfeeding helps prevent disease and promote health in both babies and mothers. It is clear that breastfed babies suffer less tummy upsets, less ear and chest infrections, less eczema, and are less likely to develop childhood cancers. It is also clear that mothers who breastfeed are less likely to get breast cancer. Breastfeeding may also reduce the risk of Type 2 diabetes, coeliac disease, obesity and cardiac disease for children. The World Health Organisation recommends that all babies are breastfed up to at least 6 months. Despite many attempts by the government and the NHS, breastfeeding rates in the UK are among the lowest in the world. So in the UK many children and mothers have illnesses which would be prevented if more babies could be breastfed. Lots of things have been (and are being) tried to encourage mothers to breastfed at birth and at 6 weeks and at 6 months. But despite these efforts breastfeeding rates in the UK are still very low. Breastfeeding rates are particularly low in more deprived areas and lower income communities, and these are often areas where people are less healthy generally. One possible approach is the use of financial incentives such as cash and voucher schemes. There is a long history of taxes being applied to products that are harmful e.g. alcohol and tobacco. More recently cash and vouchers etc. are being paid to encourage healthy behaviours. For example, researchers have studied what happens if you pay some people take their medication or to help pregnant women stop smoking. More recently the government helped pregnant women eat healthy food by paying vouchers to women on Income Support and Job Seekers Allowance (Healthy Start Scheme). Researchers at the University of Sheffield (working with researchers at the University of York and the University of Brunel) are exploring a new approach to encourage women to breastfeed - a 'Health in Early Feeding Scheme'. Researchers are studying the effect of offering an incentive 'paying' women to breastfeed. The researchers are particularly interested in studying the effect of this Scheme on women who live in areas with very low breastfeeding rates (40% or less babies being breastfed at 6 weeks). These areas also tend to be areas which are very deprived and low income areas. The researchers hope that by offering women in these areas a 'Health in Early Feeding Scheme', that more babies will be breastfed at 6 weeks. They also hope this Health in Early Feeding Scheme (HEFS) will mean more babies will be breastfed when they leave hospital, at 10 days, at 12 weeks and at 26 weeks. If more babies are breastfed then many diseases will be prevented in both babies and mothers. This study has three stages. In the first stage the researchers will select 15 out of 30 neighbourhoods with the lowest breastfeeding rates in Sheffield. The researchers will then finalise the HEFS with pregnant mothers and their families from these neighbourhoods, as well as midwives, health visitors, peer supporters, and doctors. Together they will investigate any barriers, work out the best size of incentive, how often it should be paid to women, who are the best people (e.g. health visitors, peer supporters, midwives, GPs) to tell women about the scheme and to perform any checks that might be needed for this Health in Early Feeding Scheme. In the second stage, the researchers will then test the HEFS in two of these 15 neighbourhoods. They will find out if it is feasible to offer the HEFS. They will also get a rough idea of the number of extra women who decide to (and do) breastfeed because of the offer of the HEFS. In the third stage, the researchers will offer the HEF Scheme to all pregnant women in 15 of the 30 study neighbourhoods from areas with very low breastfeeding rates in Sheffield for one year (about 1,250 out of 2,500 women). They will then look at all the information they have to see what effect the HEF Scheme has on breastfeeding rates.

Amount: £203,215
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Sheffield

Open access award. 21 Sep 2010

Not available

Amount: £45,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Sheffield

Is there a future for patent ethics committees? 27 Oct 2006

The aim of the project is to provide a preliminary exploration of the issues which may arise with the creation of ethics committees attached to national patent offices or the European Patent Office to advise on individual patent applications involving morally sensitive biotechnological inventions. Although the creation of such 'patent ethics committees' (PECs) has been recommended by the European Group on Ethics and the European Parliament and, furthermore, Norway has taken the lead in appointing the first PEC, there is as yet no other international precedent and no systematic analysis of the ambit of operation of such committees or the nature of their possible relationship to existing national and supranational research ethics committees (RECs). The aim of the pilot project would be to identify the potential synergies and tensions, conflicts, duplication or disjunctions that the creation of such committees may generate between the ethical regulatory controls· on research and the additional ethical controls on patents, with a view to providing a map to chart future collaborative research with other leading partners internationally. In terms of methodology, this pilot project will build on the results of an EU funded project on the law and ethics of human embryonic stem cell research (I" January2005 - June 2006), whose preliminary findings have highlighted a possible tension between the proposal to create an ethics review committee attached to the European Patent Office and the existing system of ethical review of biomedical research in Europe. The research fellow will undertake a review of the role of existing national research ethics committees in the UK, Norway, Japan and the US on the oversight of research involving the application of new biotechnologies in biomedical research with human subjects to provide a map of the gaps, loopholes and areas of ethical or legal controversy or uncertainty at institutional and normative level. This will be followed by a comparative analysis to chart a map of the emerging ethical and legal issues regarding the creation of PECs for future consideration.

Amount: £29,018
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Sheffield

Physiological importance of SK2 in whole body K+ homeostasis. 03 Jul 2007

Regulated K+ secretion by the renal collecting duct is critical for regulation of whole body K+ homeostasis. Although the K+ channel ROMK plays an important role in this process, it is clear that additional K+ channels are also involved, e.g. BK channels in response to changes in tubular flow and dietary K+. Previous and preliminary work suggests that SK2 also plays a role in this process. In preliminary experiments plasma K+ in SK2 KO mice was increased and the fractional excretion of K+ was reduced, consistent with a role for SK2 in K+ secretion. The aim of the proposed project is to examine this further, using in vivo, molecular, fluorescence and electrophysiological approaches. Experiments will compare wildtype and SK2 KO mice examining whole renal function under control, volume expanded conditions and in response to changes in dietary K+. Molecular and fluorescence approaches will determine the cellular location of SK2. These experiments will also examine whether different K+ diets alter SK2 expression. Finally, electrophysiological studies will be used to identify SK2 at a functional level and examine physiological regulation. Elucidating the mechanisms underlying renal K+ secretion will increase our understanding of renal physiology in both health and disease.

Amount: £247,845
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Sheffield

Is subcortical input to the basal ganglia via the thalamus organised into parallel, functionally segregated channels ? 12 Oct 2006

Analysis of parallel, partially closed-loop projections connecting the cerebral cortex with the basal ganglia has been a dominant feature in basal ganglia research for the past 20 years. Although of comparable anatomical significance, input from the thalamus has received much less attention. The likely importance of this input was, however, emphasised in our recent proposal that a series of phylogenetically older, looped connections exist between the basal ganglia and important structures in the brainstem, including the midbrain superior colliculus (SC). A general feature of subcortical input to the basal ganglia (striatum) is that it arrives via relays in the thalamus (Appendix Fig 1). Thus, a direct test of the 'subcortical loops' hypothesis will determine whether the multiple thalamic relays that receive input from the SC and provide output to the striatum can be viewed as anatomically and functionally segregated channels. We propose a series of convergent anatomical, physiological and behavioural investigations to test this hypothesis. Given the evolutionary conserved nature of subcortical brain architecture, understanding this circuitry will help us appreciate how this currently poorly understood component of the basal ganglia might contribute to the basal ganglia-related dysfunctions that afflict humans.

Amount: £334,830
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Sheffield

Core costs 18 Jan 2019

To support the work of the charity r.

Amount: £1,000
Funder: County Durham Community Foundation
Recipient: Royal British Legion