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Results

LifeLines 20 Apr 2016

This is the expansion of a project supporting volunteers aged 50 plus to run activities for vulnerable older people to improve health and well-being. These have previously included art classes, creative writing, yoga and computer club. The group will expand across the city, recruiting more volunteers, supporting more than 800 new people and establishing a Men’s Network to encourage older men to socialise regularly. It will also extend its HealthLink scheme to help older people get to medical appointments.

Kilkeel RBL - Saving Our Community Venue 22 Oct 2015

The group is a community and voluntary based organisation providing a range of services and activities to the local community. They received a grant of £10,000 to make improvements to their venue so that it can be used for more classes and activities.

Grant to Royal British Legion Tipton Branch 19 May 2016

Remembering Tipton's World War One Heroes

Grant awarded to The Royal British Legion (Forest Hall) Branch And Club (Tyne & Wear) 20 Nov 1998

Towards improving access and facilities for disabled people at the Forest Hall Ex-Servicemen's Institute.

Grant awarded to Community Service Volunteers (Training and Enterprise NE) (Tyne & Wear) 13 Jul 2004

To provide daycare services to older people living in high rise flats in Newcastle.

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship. 25 Jun 2012

Not available

Amount: £4,320
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Southampton

Developmental programming of stress responses in Indian children and their association with cardiovascular risk and cognitive function. 07 Apr 2011

Recent studies suggest that the association between impaired growth in early life and adult chronic disease may be mediated by an exaggerated physiological response to stress, resulting in up-regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and autonomic nervous system. This study proposes to test this hypothesis in 250 children aged 13-14 years, from a birth cohort in Mysore, India. After baseline salivary cortisol and cardiac activity measurements, the Trier Social Stress Test for children , a humane method of inducing psychological stress in children, will be administered. Cardiac reactivity will be measured throughout the test and salivary cortisol concentrations will be measured afterwards. Fasting blood samples will be taken for plasma glucose and insulin concentrations, insulin resistance (HOMA), and lipid concentrations. Cognitive function will be assessed using a validated cognitive battery. This study will show whether impaired intra-uterine and infant growth and rapid childhood growth are associated with elevated stress responses and cardiovascular risk factors in Indian children. This will add to the scientific understanding of early life programming of non-communicable disease through altered stress-responsiveness.

Amount: £230,872
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Southampton

Open access award 2011/12. 20 Sep 2011

Not available

Amount: £30,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Southampton

Genetic testing of Children: Updating national guidelines. 18 Feb 2009

This meeting, which will be facilitated by the Genethics Club, will develop a proposal for updating professional guidelines on the genetic testing of children. A background scoping meeting in June 2007 sought professional and lay opinions and identified some key areas where the 1994 guidance is out of date. Genetic services and the number of genetic tests have increased substantially over the past fourteen years and genetic testing has spread outside the confines of the small speciality of clinical genetics. For example, national neonatal screening programmes, oncology and haematology are now increasingly involved with genetic testing and there is a need for clear guidance for practitioners faced with requests from parents. At the same time, research into childhood genetic testing has been extremely limited, in part because professional guidelines suggested it should not take place. We therefore plan to hold a one day meeting of key individuals to discuss the development and implementation of new guidelines taking these developments into account. Integral to the guidance revision is the identification of key avenues for future research and the development of collaborations with clinical services on a national level to facilitate its implementation.

Amount: £4,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Southampton

Extrachromosomal elements of Chlamydia: Development of an efficient transformation system for Chlamydia trachomatis. 27 Apr 2010

The inability to take a direct genetic approach to study the function and regulation of chlamydial genes has held back research progress. Whilst the possibility of introducing foreign DNA has been established the protocols are extremely inefficient, haphazard and irreproducible. The accumulated evidence strongly suggests that the replicating metabolically active form of the organism, the reticulate body (RB) is the bacterial form susceptible to DNA uptake. Accordingly we propose a systematic t echnology development programme to determine the most efficient way to introduce 'foreign' DNA firstly, to the chlamydial inclusion and secondly into chlamydia themselves (RBs). Our proposal has seven key objectives, the first three are to determine the optimal cell line, chlamydial strain and conditions for introducing DNA into the inclusion. The next steps then involve optimising the protocol for RB transformation using the phage genome (a self amplifying molecule that negates the need for sel ection) and the final step is to develop a vector carrying a selectable marker. Having established the optimal conditions and vector our sixth objective is to ensure this process is reproducible in another lab and finally we wish to disseminate this knowledge via a working protocol and workshop to our colleagues in the field.

Amount: £333,626
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Southampton

Me my health and my children's health. 01 Oct 2008

This project aims to provide secondary school students in Southampton with a deeper understanding of how they can improve their own health and the health of their future children under a framework of 'Me, my health and my children's health'. The project tests a new method of student and teacher participation in order to tackle some of the biggest contemporary health issues facing young people. This approach involves giving the students first-hand experience of modern biomedical practices carried out in their local hospital. To stimulate interest and excitement, and encourage new ways of thinking about biomedical science, these will be practical activities based at the university using authentic hospital equipment, clear links will be made to the school curriculum in partnership with Southampton City Council, and a scheme of work will be written for future use by other schools. The programme will enable students and teachers to explore the latest scientific techniques that cannot be taught in schools, and will include professional development for the teachers. There will be a half-day event at which students will present their work and engage in informed debate about these important socio-scientific issues in front of parents/guardians and invited members of the community. The project will also include professional training for science teachers to enhance formal and informal learning about the issues and maximise the impact on the students. The project will be rigorously evaluated throughout, and findings will be disseminated by means of a half-day conference for science teachers, educators and researchers.

Amount: £29,699
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Southampton

Student Elective Prize for Ms Veline Lesperance 29 Aug 2008

A study of age related automatic nervous system markers in high and low altitude Andean populations

Amount: £1,600
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Southampton

Value in People Award. 17 Oct 2007

Not available

Amount: £200,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Southampton

Lifecourse trajectory of muscle strength and the relationship with physical activity: exploiting the HALCyon and FALCon Cohort Consortia. 21 Jun 2012

Muscle strength is central to the current and future health of older people. There is increasing recognition that muscle strength in later life depends not only on the rate of decline but the peak reached earlier in life, but the trajectory of muscle strength across the lifecourse and its determinants have been little studied. As no one cohort has repeated measures of strength for the same individuals from childhood to old age, it is necessary to combine repeated measures from several cohorts in order to construct a lifecourse trajectory of muscle strength. Customary physical activity appears to be an important modifiable factor related to muscle strength but the optimal time in life for beneficial intervention is unclear. Understanding when increased customary physical activity could have maximal effect would have major relevance for potential public health interventions to improve health in old age. Aims 1. To describe a lifecourse grip strength trajectory from childhood to old a ge, by combining data from several UK cohorts 2. To compare the influence of physical activity on grip strength at different ages across the lifecourse 3. To explore the relationship between physical activity and subsequent grip strength trajectory

Amount: £176,331
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Southampton

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship. 20 May 2011

Not available

Amount: £7,200
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Southampton

Contrasting immune adaptation in peripheral organs and the central nervous system in response to chronic infection in health and disease. 03 May 2007

Systemic inflammation or infection leads to the generation of inflammatory cytokines in the periphery that communicate with the brain to initiate cytokine synthesis there. These cytokines in the brain in turn give rise to fever and behavioural changes such as anorexia, loss of activity and depression, known as sickness behaviour. It is well known that repeated or sustained systemic inflammatory challenges lead to a state of immune tolerance in the periphery: an important protective mechanism ag ainst over-activity of the immune system. We will investigate whether there is a state of immune tolerance induced in the brain, after repeated or sustained peripheral inflammatory challenges, using measures of cytokine production and the associated behaviours. We have evidence that, in brain, repeated systemic challenges do not lead to the same state of innate immune tolerance as seen in the periphery. We will investigate the cell types and potential pathways involved in the non-tolerant state. We will investigate whether an immune tolerant state is evoked in brains with ongoing neurodegeneration, in which the innate immune system is already primed by the pathology. We predict that the lack of innate immune tolerance mechanisms in the brain will exacerbate the progression of chronic neurodegenerative disease.

Amount: £327,553
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Southampton

Collagen assembly and accumulation in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. 20 Feb 2013

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic fibrotic lung disease with significant unmet clinical needs. No therapy has been shown to improve a median survival of only 35 months. IPF is characterised by excessive proliferation of fibroblasts and their differentiation into myofibroblasts that produce large amounts of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins including interstitial collagens. Although altered ECM cross-linking and stiffness at the cellular-scale are proposed to play a key role in t he mediation of IPF by promoting divergent myofibroblast behaviour, it is incompletely understood if, and at what scale, collagen assembly, accumulation, and biomechanical properties are altered in IPF. I hypothesise that aberrant collagen assembly and accumulation in IPF causes altered extracellular matrix physical properties and dynamics. This may promote the disease persistence and progression. Using cross-disciplinary collaboration, I propose to compare the ex vivo assembly and biome chanical properties of collagen in healthy and fibrotic lung tissue. I will then utilise a novel in vitro 3D primary human lung fibroblast culture model, and in vivo models, to examine the kinetics of collagen production and assembly in pulmonary fibrosis. Ultimately this work will increase understanding of ECM regulation in pulmonary fibrosis, and may aid in the identification of therapeutic targets.

Amount: £219,753
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Southampton

Core costs 18 Jan 2019

To support the work of the charity r.

Amount: £1,000
Funder: County Durham Community Foundation
Recipient: Royal British Legion

The regulation of stellate cell fate in chronic pancreatitis. 07 Dec 2006

In chronic inflammation resident pancreatic stellate cells proliferate and transform into myofibroblastic cells (activated PSC, aPSC) which produce the extracellular matrix of fibrosis. Our group has shown that agents which promote apoptosis of activated hepatic stellate cells are antifibrotic. Survival signals supporting aPSC might be good targets for antifibrotic therapy. The overall aim of this study is to examine factors that maintain survival of aPSC in CP, focusing on two candidates - tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) and insulin. A) Antiapoptotic effects of insulin and TIMP-1 on serum-deprived cultured rat aPSC will be examined using acridineorange and TUNEL staining of nuclei and cellular caspase-3 activity. Potential intracellular mediators of apoptosis to be examined using gene arrays. Expression studies and activity/reporter assays of NFkappa B will be undertaken. B) Mechanistic studies of the role of TIMP-1 in maintaining aPSC survival. We will compare both processes during development and resolution offibrosis in cerulein induced CP in normal versus TIMP-1 knockout mice. Fibrosis development and aPSC numbers and apoptosis will be assessed. C) Markers of apoptosis will be examined in thin sections of clinical samples of CP with mRNA expression examined using laser capture microdissection of aPSC then quantitative PCR.

Amount: £208,936
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Southampton

Towards understanding the molecular interactions in biological membranes: a functional approach by solid-state NMR. 29 Jun 2006

Characterisation of the molecular interactions that occur within biological membranes is vital if we are to understand the myriad of processes they support. The research proposed intends to exploit the unique and recent potential of solid-state NMR to study biological membranes without extraction of the individual components and under near physiological conditions. My goal is to provide dynamic and structural information regarding protein/protein andprotein/lipid interactions occurring within the bilayer and their modulation by small molecules. Initially this will focus on: 1) Characterisation of molecular contacts in biomembranes. This research studies the interaction of anaesthetics at the lipid/protein interface of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, a protein readily purified from T.nobiliana. Exploiting the favourable NMR properties of protons we aim to characterise the interface between these molecules at a molecular level, providing key structural data for rational drug design.2) Analyse the effect of bilayer composition on the lateral segregation, structure and oligomeric state of membrane proteins and investigate its role in protein trafficking. Systematically applying multidimensional magic-angle spinning and oriented sample NMR techniques together with diffusion measurements I aim to study these effects on Fukutins to understand how interactions with the lipid bilayer regulates their trafficking.

Amount: £433,912
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Southampton