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Results

LifeLines 20 Apr 2016

This is the expansion of a project supporting volunteers aged 50 plus to run activities for vulnerable older people to improve health and well-being. These have previously included art classes, creative writing, yoga and computer club. The group will expand across the city, recruiting more volunteers, supporting more than 800 new people and establishing a Men’s Network to encourage older men to socialise regularly. It will also extend its HealthLink scheme to help older people get to medical appointments.

Kilkeel RBL - Saving Our Community Venue 22 Oct 2015

The group is a community and voluntary based organisation providing a range of services and activities to the local community. They received a grant of £10,000 to make improvements to their venue so that it can be used for more classes and activities.

Grant to Royal British Legion Tipton Branch 19 May 2016

Remembering Tipton's World War One Heroes

Grant awarded to The Royal British Legion (Forest Hall) Branch And Club (Tyne & Wear) 20 Nov 1998

Towards improving access and facilities for disabled people at the Forest Hall Ex-Servicemen's Institute.

Grant awarded to Community Service Volunteers (Training and Enterprise NE) (Tyne & Wear) 13 Jul 2004

To provide daycare services to older people living in high rise flats in Newcastle.

Jewish mothers and Jewish babies: Childbearing and childrearing amongst Jewish women in England and Israel c. 1948-1990. 13 Jun 2012

Combining archival research with oral history, this research will contrast the experience of three groups: (i) women from Jewish communities in England, (ii) Jewish women of European (Ashkenazi) heritage in Israel and (iii) Jewish women of North African and West Asian (Mizrahi) heritage in Israel, in order to examine the relationship between scientific and religious discourses in the fields of maternal and child health. The project seeks to question existing historical interpretations which hav e viewed the approbation of medical technologies that intervene in maternity and reproduction as a facet of modernity and secularization. The project will examine the national and cultural differences that led to the divergence in responses towards the medicalization of birth in the two countries and will ask whether the Israeli state imposed one model of maternity care specifically in order to deal with the diversity of its population and establish national unity. It will interrogate how diff erent traditions of collective childcare in England and Israel shaped mothers' experiences, and the flow of ideas on child development between the two nations. Finally it will explore the effects of the different patterns of migration and settlement upon the three groups' experiences of childbearing and childrearing.

Amount: £229,613
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Warwick

Conformational, dynamic and ligand-binding properties of protein disulphide-isomerase: studies with site-specific NMR and fluorescent probes. 14 Oct 2010

We will use state-of-the-art spectroscopic methods to probe the structure and dynamics of full-length PDI (abb xa c domains) and various domain combinations. We will determine relative domain orientations within the full-length protein, measuring residual dipolar couplings of PDI biosynthetically labelled with 15N-Leu. The Leu residues will be assigned using our existing full backbone assignments of domains and domain pairs and will also act as probes within each domain to reveal dynamics by NOE , relaxation and exchange studies. We will use FRET to measure distances between sites and single-molecule FRET to determine the distribution of distances and resolve multiple conformers; we will place FRET pairs on the redox-active sites in a and a domains of PDI, subsequently introducing Cys residues at other defined sites, to obtain several distances and so triangulate conformations and understand domain motions. We will repeat these studies in presence of unfolded and part-folded protein li gands to determine effects on PDI conformation and dynamics, and also study mutants which constrain the relative orientations of b and x regions. We will provide novel structural, kinetic and thermodynamic information on the interaction between PDI and ligands by introducing site-specific fluorescence and NMR probes into peptide and protein ligands.

Amount: £236,581
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Warwick

FluPro - a novel flu antiviral. 11 Sep 2009

"Influenza ranges from seasonal disease to catastrophic pandemics. Anti-flu measures include vaccines and antivirals. Vaccines have their problems as they act only against the current viruses and are ineffective against new pandemic strains. The antivirals Tamiflu and Relenza act against all flu viruses, but there is already widespread resistance to Tamiflu. New measures are urgently needed. Warwick's approach has been to isolate a natural 'protecting virus' called FluPro®. This is a harmless version of the flu virus itself and is delivered to the nose. Only those cells that influenza normally infects get treated. FluPro has been tested in laboratory models where a single intranasal dose completely prevents disease caused by several different flu viruses. Post-infection treatment is also effective. FluPro tricks infectious flu viruses into making non-functional virus particles (i.e. more FluPro) instead of the infectious virus. In this way it reduces the infection and the spread of infection, and increases the amount of protection."

Amount: £444,542
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Warwick

Biomedical vacation scholarship. 29 May 2009

Not available

Amount: £2,880
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Warwick

Open Access Award. 16 Sep 2008

Not available

Amount: £20,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Warwick

Value in People Award. 29 Mar 2010

Not available

Amount: £200,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Warwick

Open access award. 22 Sep 2009

Not available

Amount: £30,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Warwick

Temporal regulation of endocrine gene expression - timing in living cells and tissues. 31 Aug 2010

We aim to understand the dynamic regulation of pituitary hormone gene expression in living cells and tissues using valuable transgenic rat models generated over our previous period of funding. Using luciferase or destabilised fluorescent proteins to report promoter activity in real time, we will use pituitary cells and tissue slice preparations to understand the spatio-temporal patterns of gene expression, with 4-dimensional non-linear mathematical modelling approaches to test in what ways cells are transcriptionally coordinated in different circumstances, including fetal and neonatal development, responses to oestrogen, and lactotroph hyperplasia. The transgenic rat models we have generated have shown dramatic induction of human prolactin gene expression in extra-pituitary tissues after inflammatory stress. In addition to detailed assessment of endogenous prolactin gene expression in human tissues, we will use this to identify the pathways involved in prolactin's role in different types of inflammatory response.

Amount: £177,860
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Warwick

RNA localisation in the Xenopus oocyte. 20 Feb 2008

The development of the early embryo depends on the polarisation of the egg and an important component of this is the localisation of mRNAs that determine cell fate. In vertebrates the Xenopus oocyte has been particularly productive in understanding RNA localisation, which has been ascribed to several kinds of simple repeated sequences found in the 3 UTRs of localised mRNAs. These direct RNAs either to the germ plasm, which controls germ line development, or to the wider vegetal cortex, where th ey control early embryonic patterning (these are early and late pathways). Exactly how this is achieved is only partially understood. We have made preliminary quite unexpected and novel observations that localisation to germ plasm can be achieved in late oogenesis and involves co-operation between 3 UTRs and previously unsuspected 5 sequences. These interactions may be intermolecular, suggesting they are the basis of mRNP particle building. We will define the 5 localisation sequences in s everal mRNAs and establish the nature of their interactions with 3 sequences. The role of these sequences and their interactions in building mRNP particles will be studied, and the proteins that bind to them will be identified.

Amount: £232,455
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Warwick

"Signalling Sound" to be held at the University of Warwick on 7th March 2009 16 Sep 2008

International Symposium, 'Signalling Sound'

Amount: £4,967
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Warwick

'Medicine and New Media' Summer School 2008 to be held at the Centre for the History of Medicine, Warwick University. 19 Feb 2008

The first Summer School organized by the Centre for the History of Medicine at the University of Warwick will explore the history of medical imaging from the Renaissance to present times. Participants will trace technological developments and their consequences in medicine, alongside consideration of how these new ways of 'seeing' the human body reflected and were shaped by the concerns of scientists, physicians, artists and the general population. Each day of the Summer School will be devoted to a particular technology and the period in which this was received as a new medium for visualizing the body and its functions. These are: print in the early modern period; photography in the nineteenth century; X-ray in the early-twentieth century; digital imaging techniques from the twentieth century through to the contemporary era. Participants will consider the meaning of images of the human body and how agreement about such meaning is negotiated (in the laboratory, in modern mass-media, public displays in museums, in university anatomy teaching). What are the epistemological, moral and philosophical consequences of our desire to picture all functions of the human body? What does it mean to be human in a world of global mass media in which the individual body is central, yet completely public and commercialised? Are there alternatives to the understanding in Western science since the nineteenth century that vision is the primary avenue to knowledge and sight takes precedence over the other senses as a tool in the analysis of living things? The emphasis of the course will be on encouraging discussion and exchanging ideas across disciplinary boundaries, yet with a focus on the history of medicine, giving emerging scholars the opportunity to work closely with senior academics and become versed in interdisciplinary debates and approaches relating to the theme. The participants will meet every morning with two experts to discuss the topic of the day. The afternoon will be reserved for activities related to the theoretical issues discussed in the morning such as digital anatomy, scanning, and photography sessions etc. A background reading pack will be sent to each participant in advance to prepare them for discussion. With the success of Medicine and New Media, the Centre hopes to hold a Summer School on a different theme every two yeas. This event figures in our proposal for a second Strategic Award on the theme 'Situating Medicine'.

Amount: £3,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Warwick

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship. 20 May 2011

Not available

Amount: £1,440
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Warwick

Transforming statistical methodology for neuroimaging meta-analysis. 26 Nov 2012

Neuroimaging Meta-Analysis (NMA) is used to synthesize multiple brain imaging studies, a crucial tool for a discipline where N's of 20 or less are typical. Use of NMA has been growing rapidly but suffers from critical limitations of which most users are unaware. Given a selection of neuroimaging studies, e.g., on reward processing, a meta-analysis will produce a picture of coloured regions of significance; a user will use this picture to make spatial and reverse inferences: Spatial, in assertin g that an effect corresponds to a specific anatomical location, and reverse in that a study attribute (i.e. reward processing) is specifically associated with that region. In fact, standard NMA methods cannot provide either: No confidence volumes (3-dimensional confidence intervals) that quantify the uncertainty in the localisation are available, nor can the user conclude that a region is uniquely associated with the selected studies (e.g., reward processing may activate the nucleus accumbens, but so may emotion processing tasks). My fellowship will focus on transforming NMA through development of new methodology and software tools that will address these and other problems. Specific goals include: 1. Development of spatial Bayesian models for NMA data, to deliver true spatial and reverse inferences through a detailed generative statistical model. 2. Detecting, exploring and accommodating inter-study variability with exploratory and confirmatory methods. 3. Correcting publ ication bias (aka the file drawer problem ) & voxel-selection bias (aka the voodoo correlation problem) for NMA inferences. 4. Neuroinformatic tools to facilitate data-sharing and minimize errors and information loss in the process: Data->analysis->publication->meta-analysis.

Amount: £1,250,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Warwick

Medical Prognosis in Late Antiquity. 05 Dec 2012

This project will offer the first comprehensive study of ancient medical prognostic tools and predictive strategies in late antiquity. Taking Galen's oeuvre as a pivotal moment in the development of such tools and strategies, it will focus on post-Galenic medicine with the aim of reviewing and explaining the deep transformations, as well as the threads of continuity, that characterize the field of medical prognosis between Galen's legacy and the end of antiquity. Specifically this project will f ocus on this transitional period for three crucial areas of ancient medical prognostication, namely uroscopy, sphygmology and, to a lesser extent, astrology. Analysis of these methods will allow a realistic assessment of Galen's input in this crucial area of ancient medicine. The project will examine the overused notion of Galenism (Temkin 1973) in the context of late-antique prognosis in order to propose hypotheses about (1) the transformation of prognostic strategies, (2) the paths of knowledg e that allowed their transfer to the West in late antiquity, and (3) the exact role of Galen in late antique medical theory and practise. To this end, a number of works ascribed to Galen, of disputed date and authorship, will form the textual basis of the enquiry.

Amount: £235,410
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Warwick