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Results

LifeLines 20 Apr 2016

This is the expansion of a project supporting volunteers aged 50 plus to run activities for vulnerable older people to improve health and well-being. These have previously included art classes, creative writing, yoga and computer club. The group will expand across the city, recruiting more volunteers, supporting more than 800 new people and establishing a Men’s Network to encourage older men to socialise regularly. It will also extend its HealthLink scheme to help older people get to medical appointments.

Kilkeel RBL - Saving Our Community Venue 22 Oct 2015

The group is a community and voluntary based organisation providing a range of services and activities to the local community. They received a grant of £10,000 to make improvements to their venue so that it can be used for more classes and activities.

Grant to Royal British Legion Tipton Branch 19 May 2016

Remembering Tipton's World War One Heroes

Grant awarded to The Royal British Legion (Forest Hall) Branch And Club (Tyne & Wear) 20 Nov 1998

Towards improving access and facilities for disabled people at the Forest Hall Ex-Servicemen's Institute.

Grant awarded to Community Service Volunteers (Training and Enterprise NE) (Tyne & Wear) 13 Jul 2004

To provide daycare services to older people living in high rise flats in Newcastle.

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship 25 Jun 2012

Not available

Amount: £7,200
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of York

Master's Studentship 12 Jul 2011

Not available

Amount: £18,705
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of York

Identifying the contribution of the prevalent, diverse, phage-derived gtr operons to O-antigen modification and Salmonella diversity, virulence and persistence. 07 Mar 2011

Salmonella enterica enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis are a major cause of gastroenteritis but a specific Typhimurium strain lineage is associated with systemic disease. Strain evolution by genome degradation and horizontal gene transfer is ongoing. This application focuses on a diverse group of glycosyltransferase (gtr) operons that are phage derived or encoded, and of which individual Salmonella genomes can encode multiple variants. Our hypothesis is that these gtr operons med iate significant diversity in immunodominant antigens of Salmonella, specifically of the O-antigen or capsule. This could facilitate co-infection in animal reservoirs and thus persistence, and may directly enhance virulence. The overall goal of the project is to further our understanding of the role and significance of the gtr operons. Our three Specific Aims are to determine signals occurring during infection that alter gtr expression, to identify the biochemical activity of members of differ ent and diverse gtrC families, and to assess the role of the gene products in host-pathogen interactions. This builds upon current work that identified phase variation as a common gtr regulatory mechanism and novel O-antigen gtr mediated changes. A better understanding of gtr-mediated modification may contribute to the development of improved tools for epidemiology and vaccines.

Amount: £204,876
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of York

Biomedical vacation scholarship. 29 May 2009

Not available

Amount: £3,960
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of York

Value in people award. 21 Oct 2008

Not available

Amount: £200,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of York

A combined in vitro and in virtuo multi-scale approach to understanding calcium signalling as a signature and integrator of cellular response. 04 Feb 2010

An integrated process of computational model development, quantitative experimentation and iterative cycles of simulation and hypothesis testing will be used to characterise calcium signals generated during epithelial scratch-wounding and explore how these are translated into individual cell response and emergent tissue behaviour. Calcium-signalling and cell response will be monitored in scratch wounded uro-epithelial cell cultures. Candidate receptor and ion channel expression will be inferred from pre-existing transcriptome data and confirmed functionally using agonists/inhibitors. These data will be used to inform modules of a computational model incorporating different mechanisms of calcium release and signal transmission. The calcium signature (amplitude and duration) experienced in response to a specific stimulus will be mapped to the resultant cell response and used to inform a software agent model that will be used to explore wound healing as an emergent context-specific prop erty of individual cell response. The key goals are 1) Characterisation of calcium signalling mechanisms during urothelial self-repair. 2) Integrate calcium signalling with individual cell response in a nondeterministic agent-based computational model in order to investigate emergent field properties. 3) Develop an extensible computational tool for biologists to relate calcium signalling and cell behaviour in different tissues and situations, such as compromised wound healing.

Amount: £371,918
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of York

The epidemiology and immunology of Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus in Uganda. 24 Nov 2009

The impact of the HIV epidemic on the spread of Kaposi s sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is poorly understood and is of significant public health concern. We plan to exploit the unique resources available at MRC/UVRI to investigate the epidemiology and immunology of KSHV in longstanding cohorts of well-characterised people. The research questions are: 1) has the prevalence of KSHV increased in the last 20 years in a population in which HIV is relatively common? 2) is the prevalence of KSHV higher among couples in which one or both partners is infected with HIV than in couples without HIV infection? 3) among children born to mothers infected with KSHV, is the prevalence of KSHV higher among those children whose mothers also have HIV infection, than in those whose mothers do not? 4) does the age of infection correlate with subsequent anti-KSHV antibody titres (which are related to risk of KS)? We will also conduct innovative research on the cellular immune response to KSHV in a pop ulation where the infection is endemic. Because we plan to use existing biological samples and data, this study represent significant added value to current research activity and can be completed within the available time.

Amount: £294,219
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of York

Value in People Award. 17 Oct 2007

Not available

Amount: £200,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of York

Open Access award. 31 Oct 2006

Not available

Amount: £10,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of York

Open access award 2012/13. 17 Sep 2012

Not available

Amount: £60,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of York

Dissecting bacterial interactions with the urothelium using emergent mass al spectrometry techniques 25 Jun 2012

Urinary tract infections (UTI) caused by uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) cause significant levels of morbidity across a broad spectrum of clinical populations. The urothelium is recognised as an active tissue, with important roles in damage response and sensing within the bladder, including its role asthe primary effector of the immune response to UPEC infection. Previous work in the Southgate group has shown that diffusible mediators, such as ATP, play an important role in urothelial response to damage and healing. Evidence exists that extracellular ATP can also stimulate bacterial biofilm formation, offering protection against the immune response. The effects of UPEC-urothelial interaction and its respective effects on UPEC phenotype ad urothelial homeostasis are poorly understood. We aim to develop state of the art mass spectrometry techniques to enable the analysis of the intracellular metabolome and the extracellular secretome of normal human urothelial (NHU) cells in order to further understand the role that diffusible mediators play in the interaction between the urothelium, UPEC, and the urothelial response to damage and repair.

Amount: £150,048
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of York

Structure and mechanism of multicomponent protein-nucleic acid assemblies. 26 Mar 2012

The research will focus on analysing protein-nucleic acid interactions in the framework of large assemblies. Although the main emphasis is on X-ray analysis, several complementary techniques such as electron microscopy, mass spectrometry, surface plasmon resonance, polarisation anisotropy and analytical ultracentrifugation, which provide insight into the assemblys composition and the strength of interaction, will be applied. Key goals: (1) To continue investigations into the mechanism of DNA t ranslocation by double-stranded DNA viruses, using motor proteins of several bacteriophages belonging to Siphoviridae. To characterise interactions between the large and small terminase proteins, portal protein and DNA. To analyse the three-dimensional organisation of the motor using a combination of X-ray structural analysis with electron microscopy. To understand how structural events associated with ATP hydrolysis are coupled with the mechanical translocation of DNA. (2) To understand the st ructure-function relationship for several tRNA modifying enzymes, with particular focus on human hDus2 protein linked with lung cancer. To characterize protein interactions with tRNA and determine the crystal structures of protein-tRNA complexes. (3) To use structural knowledge on the viral motor and other oligomeric assemblies for pilot studies aimed at engineering a stable molecular device that can be used for transfer of genetic information in a controlled fashion.

Amount: £1,301,433
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of York

Open access award. 21 Sep 2010

Not available

Amount: £30,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of York

A T cell receptor transgenic model for studying CD4+ effector and regulatory T cells in bacterial-induced colitis. 19 Oct 2006

The intestinal bacterial flora and the CD4+ T cell response to these bacteria play an important role in the induction and regulation of chronic intestinal inflammation. The process by which bacteria-specific CD4+ T cell responses are initiated, and the factors that determine pathogenic versus disease-protective CD4+ T cell effector choice, are however not well understood. The objectives of this project are to define the mechanisms by which specific bacterial antigen/CD4+ T cell interactions trig ger colitis in disease-susceptible hosts and suppress its induction in disease-resistant hosts. We will use a newly developed transgenic mouse model based on the T cell receptor of a disease-inducing CD4+ T cell clone specific for the flagellar hook protein (FHP) of Helicobacter hepaticus. This system will enable us to distinguish bacterial from host-directed immune responses and to study the development of pathogenic effector and disease-protective T regulatory (Treg) cells. The goals of the pr oject are to i) identify the process whereby FHP-specific CD4+ T cells trigger inflammation in the intestine of H. hepaticus-infected mice, ii) define the interaction between H. hepaticus and dendritic cells (DCs), and iii) determine whether mucosal DCs can induce the differentiation of FHP-specific CD4+ Treg cells.

Amount: £287,708
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of York

Biophysical and structural characterisation of an in vitro-assembled viral DNApackaging system 24 Jun 2013

During the assembly of herpes viruses a DNA packaging motor inserts the viral genome into procapsids. Related motors from tailed bacteriophages have proved to be excellent models for understanding this process. Thus, we propose to assemble in vitro the motor system of Escherichia coli phage HK97 for further biophysical and structural studies. Single-molecule magnetic tweezers experiments will be conducted to explore the kinetics and thermodynamics of packaging as well as the requirements for a functional system. Electron microscopy and Xray crystallography will be used to determine structures of the assembly intermediates and of individual components and sub-complexes. Ultimately, we hope to elucidate the mechanisms of viral DNA packaging so that we are better informed when studying more complicated systems such as herpes viruses.

Amount: £149,673
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of York