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Underwire Festival 2012 17 Sep 2012

Not available

Amount: £500
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Underwire Festival

Protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions in the glycolytic pathway. 20 May 2011

T. brucei is a small parasite that causes African trypanisomiasis, commonly known as sleeping sickness, in humans and nagana in cattle in Africa. It has life cycle stages in both the mammalian host and the tsetse fly vector and makes several morphological and biochemical changes when migrating between the two. The mechanisms and control of cell proliferation and differentiation is essential to the life cycle of the parasite and thus understanding the details of these processes is important for the discovery of new drug targets to combat this disease. The genome of T. brucei and other related parasites have been sequenced and many biochemical and genetic tools are available to enable molecular dissection of the genes involved in cell division and differentiation. Previous studies of the structural mechanics of cell division have provided us with some understanding of the temporal and spatial organisation of the cell organelle and cytoskeletal structures [1]. However, much more needs to be understood about the three-dimensional spatial organisation of the cytoskeletal structures and how co-ordination of assembly and cytokinesis is performed in order to better understand the phenotypes presented by the molecular dissection experiments. During my 10 week project I used scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), immunofluorescence microscopy, and video microscopy to gain more insight into cytoskeletal organisation during cell division, and to compare the processes in the procyclic and the bloodstream forms of the parasite. SEM and video microscopy revealed important differences between the procyclic and bloodstream forms during cell division regarding attachment and growth of the new flagellum, the degree of staggering of the daughter cells during cleavage furrow ingression and the nature of the cytoplasmic connection between the two daughter cells, present just before cell abscission. Fluorescent labelling of ?-tubulin and TEM images provided some evidence for the presence of microtubules in the cytoplasmic connection in the procyclic form, although more evidence is needed.

Amount: £585
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Edinburgh

"Understanding Madness: Between Medieval and Modern Perspectives" to be held in Oxford on 29 March 2010 15 Feb 2010

Exploring the history of understanding madness Competing ways of understanding madness are not a recent phenomenon but are evident throughout history. One interesting and understudied example are the writings of the Jewish physicians who worked at the court of Saladin, the famous Muslim war hero of the Crusader period. How did they understand and treat madness at one of the apogees of medieval science? How did their interpretation compare to those of other people living in the medieval Islamic world? What can poems or the history of hospitals tell us about how madness was understood? Interdisciplinary discourse Historical interpretations of how people understood madness will be evaluated in an interdisciplinary environment. Psychiatrists, philosophers, and neuroscientists will respond to the contributions of historians, evaluating the different explanations and treatments of madness and their relevance to present day debates. Preparation of a larger symposium This workshop is intended to establish a network that will support the development of a larger symposium ?Understanding Madness? in autumn 2010 or spring 2011.

Amount: £885
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

'Chemistry and pharmacy in the colonial world' to be held at Oxford Brookes University 13th May 2010 18 Jan 2010

Intellectual historians cannot ignore the role played by alchemical practices (experiments, theories, circulation of books and manuscripts, constitution of networks covering the entire European continent and several early colonial settlements) in the agenda of Early Modern learning. Equally, studies published over the last twenty years have much contributed to the appreciation of the role of chemistry in the constitution of research practices in science, technology and medicine, and to the key social and intellectual role played by practitioners of chemistry during the 18th and 19th centuries. Finally, business historians or historians of innovation (including therapeutic innovation) can hardly escape confronting the complex interactions between university and industrial research on a continental and intercontinental level throughout the 20th century. The main goal of the joint Oxford History of Chemistry Seminar series, of which this session is to be a part, is therefore to explore and assert the centrality of the history of chemistry to a variety of research areas dealing with the social, intellectual and economic history of Europe (and beyond) over the last five centuries.

Amount: £600
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Oxford Brookes University

40 years of Family Research. 28 Mar 2006

Title of meeting: 40 years of Family Research Martin Richards has been an eminent researcher in many areas of family research and it is probably not an exaggeration to describe him as one of the pioneers in the field of psychological and social aspects of 'new' human genetics. He has raised important questions, developed research and contributed greatly in areas such as genetic screening, consent and bioethics. He has given generously of his time to serve on many committees in associated areas. The occasion of his retirement seems an appropriate time to reflect on his contributions and the way his work can be taken forward.

Amount: £750
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

The creation and early workings of the Health Service "Ombudsman", 1968-1976: historical and archival research looking into the creation, and first remit, of the Health Service Commissioner. 23 Jan 2006

The creation and early workings of the Health Service "Ombudsman", 1968-1976: historical and archival research looking into the creation, and first remit, of the Health Service Commissioner This is an application for travel expenses, further to pursue research into the creation and early history of the National Health Service 'Ombudsman'. This is the body that, since the early 1970s, has provided an avenue of complaint against 'maladministration' in the NHS. The work should clearly reflect on to contemporary practice, for the Ombudsman was to become one of the most ubiquitous new tools of government in the late twentieth century. The project asks why this was so and where the pressure came from for this reform. This being so, it should cast light on the wider mechanics of British government and politics in the post-Second World War era. The applicant has already been pursuing research into the creation of the Parliamentary Commissioner for Administration. It is envisaged that this will lead to the submission of an article to Past in Present in 2007, covering the creation of the original Parliamentary 'Ombudsman'. It is now intended to take the research on a further stage, and build on the primary evidence assembled on the Parliamentary Commissioner. The first 'Ombudsman', Sir Edmund Compton, started work in 1967. The Health Service Commissioner was not created until 1973, when Sir Alan Marre as Compton's successor took on that role. Why was the Health Service initially insulated from the work of the Parliamentary Commissioner? Why did views change about that exclusion? Why did the process take so long? Did different departments have different views? These are the questions this research will seek to answer, utilising primary materials from government, MPs and political parties. Although there are admirable histories of the Ombudsman institution in general available, especially The Ombudsman, The Citizen and Parliament by Gregory and Giddings, this will be the first historical work systematically to utilise the archives and to find out the reasons for the creation of the NHS Ombudsman, as well as the delay in its inception following the creation of the Parliamentary Commissioner for Administration.

Amount: £901
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Oxford Brookes University

Grant to Above & Beyond 15 May 2017

As requested by the donor to support care of patients at Bristol hospitals.

Amount: £500
Funder: Quartet Community Foundation
Recipient: Above & Beyond

Grant to Avonmouth Football Club 01 Aug 2017

As requested by the donor towards refurbishment of the club's facilities.

Amount: £500
Funder: Quartet Community Foundation
Recipient: Avonmouth Football Club

Grant to FareShare South West 22 Mar 2018

Grant to FareShare South West

Amount: £500
Funder: Quartet Community Foundation
Recipient: FareShare South West

Mentoring Project in Keynsham 24 Apr 2017

To support disadvantaged and vulnerable young people (aged 11 to 21) from Keynsham by providing one to one mentoring support.

Amount: £750
Funder: Quartet Community Foundation
Recipient: Mentoring Plus

Grant to Trauma Recovery Centre 22 Mar 2018

As requested by the donor.

Amount: £500
Funder: Quartet Community Foundation
Recipient: Trauma Recovery Centre

Provision of childcare for International Women's Day 23 Feb 2018

To provide childcare for 0-5s and 5-10 year olds at International Women's Day event.

Amount: £600
Funder: Quartet Community Foundation
Recipient: Bristol Women's Voice

Grant to Individual Recipient 05 Sep 2017

For travel costs and course equipment.

Amount: £800
Funder: Quartet Community Foundation
Recipient: Individual Recipient

Grant to Individual Recipient 05 Sep 2017

For transport, hobbies, textbooks, gym membership, groceries and rent.

Amount: £800
Funder: Quartet Community Foundation
Recipient: Individual Recipient

Grant to Individual Recipient 05 Sep 2017

For books, memberships, transport, stationery and software.

Amount: £800
Funder: Quartet Community Foundation
Recipient: Individual Recipient

Grant to Flax Bourton Primary School 01 Feb 2018

As directed by the donor to support additional educational intervention work with target pupil,

Grant to Anchor Society 06 Nov 2017

As requested by the donor towards housing and support for older people in need.

Amount: £500
Funder: Quartet Community Foundation
Recipient: Anchor Society