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Funders:
Paul Hamlyn Foundation
The Wellcome Trust

Results

Influence of vitamin D on metabolism of immunomodulatory lipid mediators in tuberculosis 01 Apr 2016

<p><strong>Background:</strong></p> <p>Understanding the mechanisms whereby vitamin D may enhance resolution of inflammation post-tuberculosis might lead to new host-directed therapies for this disease. My supervisor has previously shown that the active vitamin D metabolite 1,25(OH)<sub>2</sub>D induces the 5-lipoxygenase enzyme which is key to the production of a novel genus of host protective mediators termed &lsquo;specialized pro-resolving mediators&rsquo; from essential fatty acids. These mediators include the lipoxins from arachidonic acid and the resolvins, protectins and maresins from docosahexaenoic acid. The effects of <em>M. tuberculosis</em> and vitamin D on the metabolism of these mediators have yet to be characterised.</p> <p><strong>&nbsp;Key Goals:</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;To determine the influence of <em>in vitro </em>co-culture with 1,25(OH)<sub>2</sub>D and its precursor 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) on:</p> <p>1. Concentrations of pro-resolving mediators in supernatants aspirated from <em>M. tuberculosis</em>-stimulated monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM)</p> <p>2. Expression of key enzymes implicated in the synthesis and catabolism of pro-resolving mediators in <em>M. tuberculosis</em>-stimulated MDM.</p> <p><strong>&nbsp;Methods</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;MDM co-cultured with vitamin D metabolites vs. vehicle control will be infected with M. tuberculosis: supernatants and RNA will be harvested at 96 hr post-infection. Concentrations of lipid mediators will be determined by LC MS-MS at the QMUL Lipid Mediator Unit, and gene expression will be assayed by RT-PCR.</p>

Amount: £1,500
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Queen Mary University of London

Mediterranean diet and cognitive decline: using epidemiologic and pilot study data to inform a large-scale intervention. 08 Apr 2016

<p>Given the lack of effective treatments and projected increased prevalence of dementia<sup>1</sup>, there is a need to identify strategies to prevent cognitive decline. The Mediterranean diet (MD) has anti-inflammatory<sup>2</sup> and vascular benefits<sup>3</sup> and may be neuroprotective. Meta-analyses have demonstrated protective associations between MD adherence and cognitive decline<sup>4,5</sup> but evidence is limited<sup>6</sup> and the effect of MD on cognitive function is uncertain<sup>7</sup>. Further research is needed to investigate MD-associated neurological change from the earliest through to latest stages of cognitive decline. Furthermore, intervention strategies require insight into mechanisms involved in diet-induced cognitive change<sup>8</sup> and an understanding of how to support MD behaviour change, particularly in non-Mediterranean populations<sup>9</sup>.&nbsp; This proposal integrates epidemiologic and pilot behaviour change data to address identified gaps in existing knowledge and to inform the development of a large trial where the efficacy of a MD intervention to preserve cognitive function will be tested.&nbsp; Key goals are to:</p> <p>1. Comprehensively examine associations between MD adherence and cognitive function in non-Mediterranean populations</p> <p>2. Evaluate the feasibility of MD behaviour change in adults at high risk of cognitive decline</p> <p>3. Study mechanistic pathways by which a MD may act and identify cognitive outcomes most likely to respond to dietary change</p>

Amount: £76,820
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Queen's University Belfast

Symposium on Drugs, Politics and Society in the Global South 30 Apr 2016

<p>The two-day symposium intends to tackle the issue of illicit drugs through an interdisciplinary, multi-sited approach, which is also peculiar to the tradition of St Antony&rsquo;s College and the Department of Politics and International Relations at Oxford. The objective is to bring together scholars whose interest in drug politics, <em>sensu lato</em>, and area expertise can contribute to triggering meaningful comparative debate. By focusing on several themes in two days, this would allow a comprehensive discussion of major aspects of drug policy around the world. One major contribution of this symposium would be to discuss the issue of drugs in those regions, which have often been left out of the international drug policy debate. Apart from scholars working on Latin American drug politics, the events will include participation of scholars working on the Middle East, Russia, Africa and China. This would fit the area studies vision that is peculiar to the hosting college, St Antony&rsquo;s, which is known to have a strong international perspective. Similarly, it will allow reserachers from the Department of Politics and International Relations to attend and participate in the event, thus injecting new analytical and investigative input into the ongoing themes of research existing in Oxford.</p>

Amount: £5,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Transfection technologies for investigating the role and antimalarial potential of GPCR-like proteins in Plasmodium 08 Apr 2016

<p>Malaria causes more than 650 000 deaths annually, and new antimalarial therapies are urgently needed. Signalling pathways acting through GPCRs are the targets of &gt;50% of drugs currently in therapeutic use, so have high potential as antimalarial drug targets. This project is aimed, therefore, at exploring the function and therapeutic potential of <em>Plasmodium </em>members of an evolutionary-ancient family of proteins, GPR89, that are classified as divergent G-Protein Coupled Receptors and have been implicated in environmental sensing in a diverse range of eukaryotes. &nbsp;</p> <p>We aim to investigate the role of <em>Plasmodium&nbsp;</em>GPR89 in the regulation of parasite growth, differentiation, virulence and immunogenicity, and gain insights into signaling pathways operating through GPR89 by identifying binding partners within the infected-erythrocyte. &nbsp;Our approach will take advantage of our unique expertise in transfection technologies for <em>Plasmodium chabaudi</em>; a particularly useful and relevant mouse model for studying acute and chronic malaria infection and for investigating host-parasite interactions that regulate cell-cycle progression, differentiation and immune evasion during blood-stage infection. These studies will advance our understanding of GPCR-like proteins in <em>Plasmodium</em> and will bring technological advances to the <em>P.chabaudi</em> model; so providing an experimental framework for the investigation and validation of a new class of therapeutic targets.</p>

Amount: £99,893
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Edinburgh

Oncoenhancers: hubs for early embryonic reprogramming in cancer 08 Apr 2016

<p><strong><span>Genome-wide studies have underscored a role for regulatory elements (REs) as cooperative facilitators or drivers of tumour progression. &nbsp;This is partly because&nbsp;structural/epigenetic alterations&nbsp;to&nbsp;REs appear to reactivate dormant embryonic processes such as stemness leading to chemoresistance, metastasis and dormancy. However, the reactivated REs (I dub oncoenhancers) and the mechanisms regulating their early hijack remain unexplored. Therefore, I propose to build on my previous findings to delineate and characterise oncoenhancers reactivating&nbsp;the Wilms&rsquo; tumour protein (WT1)&nbsp;in epithelial cancers. Promisingly, WT1-based immunotherapy clinical trials&nbsp;are underway. WT1 has topped a National Cancer Institute antigen prioritisation list because as a developmental regulator, its well-documented expression in adult tissues is restricted to few non-epithelial cell types yet it is abnormally reactivated uniquely in epithelial cancer cells. Here, we will use a well-established inducible Ras<sup>G12V</sup>-transformed human mammary epithelial cell model (HMLER), where WT1 is abnormally reactivated, to a) identify using sequencing-based approaches and b) functionally characterise the WT1-associated oncoenhancers as an exemplar of RE reactivation in cancer. Future work will explore the functional relevance of oncoenhancers in maintaining the epithelial-mesenchymal balance upstream of WT1. The dissection of&nbsp;WT1-related&nbsp;oncoenhancers will be a paradigm for understanding dynamic embryonic enhancer malfunction in pathology.</span></strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £99,983
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Bristol

Social and economic impacts of Zika virus infection in Brazil 30 Sep 2016

<p>This proposal is for a two-site study in Brazil, focussing on Recife, where Zika virus (ZIKV) is highly endemic, and Rio de Janeiro, where it has been less common up until now. We plan to use mixed methods to assess the social and economic impacts of ZIKV at the individual (mother), family and societal level, by collecting quantitative, economic and qualitative data. The focus of the proposal is on Congenital Zika Syndrome (CZS), given the great expertise of the applicants in this area. Outputs will include scientific papers on the social and economic impacts of ZIKV at the individual and societal level and a stakeholder workshop.</p> <p>This application is being submitted by a multi-disciplinary group, which includes epidemiologists, economists and anthropologists. We are requesting supplementary funding for the two sites where fieldwork is ongoing and where we have full access to pregnant women and families of children with microcephaly and other manifestations of CZS. In Recife, the cohort study is conducted by the Microcephaly Epidemic Research Group (MERG) who have been leaders of the research response to ZIKV; and in Rio de Janeiro this is the urban Rio de Janeiro component of the cohort that reported preliminary results in the NEJM.<a href="file:///C:/Users/lanes/AppData/Local/Microsoft/Windows/Temporary%20Internet%20Files/Content.Outlook/PQS1B54L/Social%20and%20economic%20impact%20of%20Zika%20June%2015%20submission%20LSHTM.DOCX#_ENREF_1" target="_blank"><sup>1</sup></a> The two cohorts use the same standardized protocols, and the two diverse sites will allow us to investigate if the impacts are similar in different settings.&nbsp; Quantitative and economic data will be collected within the cohorts and these data will be complemented by qualitative data collected from a range of people affected by ZIKV and key stakeholders.</p> <p>The overall funding requested is &pound;299,965 over 12 months, of which &pound;90,000 is for each of the 2 sites and &pound;85,880 for the LSHTM, &pound;26,085 for international travel, and &pound;8,000 for workshop costs in Brazil.&nbsp;</p>

Low cost paper-based biosensors for point-of-care nucleic acid diagnostics of pathogens 08 Apr 2016

<p><strong>This project aims to develop ultra-low cost, paper-based biosensors that can provide point-of-care nucleic acid diagnostics of target pathogens in various specimens. As a proof-of-concept, we will design synthetic HPV viral DNA responsive genetic circuits and validate their diagnostic efficacy in a portable filter paper-based cell-free gene-expression system. This can be freeze-dried and rehydrated, and can produce graduated colorimetric outputs to indicate HPV subtype and load in cervical cell samples lysed by inexpensive nonionic detergents. We envision the proposed is an exciting, feasible and elegant solution to a major global challenge &ndash; providing kits for self-diagnosis, at home, of infectious agents that are sufficiently simple, cheap and robust to be used across the poorest countries in the world.&nbsp;</strong></p>

Amount: £99,845
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Edinburgh

Evaluation of feasibility of assessing liver function during ex situ liver perfusion using microdialysis 01 Apr 2016

<p>Each year 15% of patients on the UK liver transplant waiting list die awaiting a donor liver, while a significant proportion of livers go unused because clinicians are&nbsp;unsure that the liver would provide life sustaining function. We are now able to perfuse a liver&nbsp;ex situ&nbsp;with oxygenated blood while evaluating markers of damage&nbsp;and function, enabling better assessment of organ viability.&nbsp;<br /><br />Microdialysis is a method in routine use in neurosurgery to evaluate brain metabolism following trauma, and involves passing a fine dialysis catheter into the brain parenchyma and perfusing it with an isotonic perfusate and examining the dialysate for metabolic markers such as glucose, lactate, and pyruvate. It can also be&nbsp;used to interrogate metabolism by introducing labeled substrates. &nbsp;Microdialysis has been used to study liver transplants post transplant, but has not been used to&nbsp;evaluate function&nbsp;ex situ&nbsp;where its relatively rapid readout may facilitate early and accurate decision making.<br /><br />This project will examine the feasibility of using microdialysis in perfused livers. &nbsp;Human livers that have been declined for transplantation will be studied and the&nbsp;optimal technique developed. Microdialysis results will be correlated with perfusate chemistry (lactate fall, maintenance of pH, ALT, AST) and metabolomic profile.</p>

Amount: £2,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

Citizen-Led Accountability: Applying systems thinking to understand and strengthen health system responsiveness to marginalized communities 15 Mar 2016

<p>Citizen-led accountability initiatives have great potential to strengthen health systems by mobilizing collective action and supporting civic engagement with authorities to bolster responsiveness. While positive results have been demonstrated, the current evidence base is limited by the methodological challenge of capturing the complex nature of change pathways. This project seeks to develop a systems thinking approach that will help address this challenge by generating understanding of the function of networks in citizen-led accountability initiatives and how they contribute to health system strengthening. The research will be carried out in two phases, in indigenous communities participating in a well-established citizen-led accountability initiative in rural Guatemala. Social network analysis (SNA) will be employed in the first phase to define transmission of information and other resources and qualities of relationships that connect citizens in networks of collective action, and to examine patterns of interaction between these networks and state authorities. SNA permits visualization of the structure of a network and patterns of connections among actors, as well as identification of key actors that facilitate connectivity. The second phase will employ qualitative interpretation of SNA results to enable deeper insight into what the relational qualities mean in practice, as well understanding of conditions shaping the network's capacity to achieve health system responsiveness. The knowledge generated through this approach will be highly relevant for understanding the function of citizen-led initiatives as networks of collective action, and indicating directions for strengthening alliance-building and communication strategies. Research outputs will contribute to strengthening citizen action for health system accountability in Guatemala, advancement of conceptual understanding of accountability networks, and will provide methodological tools for further study.</p>

Design and synthesis of Inhibitors of PfDHODH: Towards a new treatment for malaria 01 Apr 2016

<p>An estimated 3.3 billion people are at risk of malaria, with populations living in sub-Saharan Africa having the highest infection rates, resulting in ~219 million documented cases of malaria and in excess of 660,000 deaths in 2010. The treatment and control of malaria is increasingly difficult due to the spread of resistance to antimalarial drugs. This is a concern even for artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs)- the first-line of treatment, where there is evidence of altered parasite sensitivity in a number of countries. In order to eradicate malaria it is clear we will need new classes of antimalarial with novel mechanisms of action and defined pharmacological profile. It is reassuring that&nbsp;several potential drugs are entering clinical trials but their success or longevity is unknown, necessitating development of new inhibitors operating on novel targets. Work at Leeds and elsewhere has identified the enzyme DHODH as an attractive target for the development of new antimalarial drugs. This project will apply structure-based drug design and synthesis to produce drug-like DHODH inhibitors as potential new antimalarial drug leads, which will then be evaluated biologically.</p>

Amount: £2,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds

The molecular mechanism of chromosome condensation mediated by cohesin and condensin 08 Apr 2016

<p>The condensation of chromosomes in the eukaryotic nucleus is essential for life, without it cells cannot faithfully segregate chromosomes. It is well known that the highly conserved condensin and cohesin protein complexes are the key factors for DNA condensation, but the physical mechanism for condensation remains unknown. One possible basis of high-order DNA organisation is that distant DNA segments (within one molecule) interact with each other mediated by cDNA bound condensin and/or cohesin. While extensive methods have been established to study inter-DNA interaction (e.g. sister chromatid cohesion), no techniques have been established to investigate biochemical properties of proposed intra-DNA interactions, required for chromosome condensation. To understand how chromosomes are organised by condensation, it is essential that new technologies are developed, as proposed here.</p> <p>Condensation in <em>Saccharomyces cerevisiae</em> has been studied using repetitive rDNA sequences as a model for conserved DNA condensation. I have established a novel genetic system to permit isolation of<em> </em>condensed chromatin formed <em>in vivo</em> by intra-rDNA interactions. Using Cre recombinase condensed native rDNA discrete chromatin circles can be liberated for biochemical characterisation. These studies will help us formulate a hypothesis on how cohesin/condensin organises rDNA, to build up a solid foundation for further grant application.</p>

Amount: £99,856
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Sheffield

Determining the Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Lysosome Damage & Repair Pathways 08 Apr 2016

<p>Lysosomes are ubiquitous membrane bound organelles that when ruptured, release hydrolytic enzymes and Hydrogen ions into the cytoplasm. This can result in DNA damage, impeded degradation of lysosomal substrates, inflammation and neurodegenerative diseases. Understanding how cells respond to such stress and how the repair/removal pathways are regulated is paramount to controlling cellular and tissue homeostasis as well as developing future therapeutic strategies. Currently, a number of stimuli can induce lysosomal damage and rupture, including bacterial pathogens, viruses, Silica crystals and lysosomotrophic agents (LLOMe). In addition, inducing lysosome damage in cancer cells with high levels of cathepsins is seen as a viable therapeutic option. However, there is a serious lack of knowledge regarding the lysosome damage sensing, repair or removal mechanisms that are initiated upon lysosomal permeablization. Therefore, I propose to use a siRNA screen to identify key regulators of this process, with particular emphasis on potentially druggable targets. We will focus our efforts on Kinases, phosphatases, de-ubiquitinases and membrane trafficking genes. By the end of this study, I hope to identify a number of candidate genes to take forward for more in-depth analysis with particular focus on regulation of bacterial infection and lysosome induced cancer cell death pathways.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £98,129
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Dundee

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship Programme - University of Dundee 30 Sep 2019

<p>This award is for 6 students per year for 5 years. It includes ?a salary at the national living wage plus holiday pay and national insurance or equivalent,?as well as?funds to cover or significantly subsidise accommodation and travel (&pound;1500 outside of London and up to &pound;2000 in London).??? It includes &pound;500 to each studentship towards research expenses.??? Unspent funds can be repurposed on further students or recruitment costs.&nbsp; Wellcome wishes to ensure a greater diversity of students (in relation to socio-economic background and ethnicity) progress to postgraduate research.&nbsp;<br> Over 5 years of the Programme we encourage organisations to aim for:&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> <br> -At least 50% of students recruited to the programme to be from underrepresented or disadvantaged groups, depending on priorities set by each organisation.&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> <br> -At least 50% of students recruited to the programme to be from non-Russell Group Universities. For the remaining 50%, organisations should consider how to recruit students from other universities as well as their own. Wellcome has included this recommended target as research indicates that most of the high-achieving STEMM graduates from minority ethnic backgrounds are located outside of Russell Group universities.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £166,500
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Dundee

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship Programme - University of Glasgow 30 Sep 2019

<p>This award is for 6 students per year for 5 years. It includes ?a salary at the national living wage plus holiday pay and national insurance or equivalent,?as well as?funds to cover or significantly subsidise accommodation and travel (&pound;1500 outside of London and up to &pound;2000 in London).??? It includes &pound;500 to each studentship towards research expenses.??? Unspent funds can be repurposed on further students or recruitment costs.&nbsp; Wellcome wishes to ensure a greater diversity of students (in relation to socio-economic background and ethnicity) progress to postgraduate research.&nbsp;<br> Over 5 years of the Programme we encourage organisations to aim for:&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> <br> -At least 50% of students recruited to the programme to be from underrepresented or disadvantaged groups, depending on priorities set by each organisation.&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> <br> -At least 50% of students recruited to the programme to be from non-Russell Group Universities. For the remaining 50%, organisations should consider how to recruit students from other universities as well as their own. Wellcome has included this recommended target as research indicates that most of the high-achieving STEMM graduates from minority ethnic backgrounds are located outside of Russell Group universities.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £166,500
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Glasgow

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship Programme - King's College London 30 Sep 2019

<p>This award is for 6 students per year for 5 years. It includes ?a salary at the national living wage plus holiday pay and national insurance or equivalent,?as well as?funds to cover or significantly subsidise accommodation and travel (&pound;1500 outside of London and up to &pound;2000 in London).??? It includes &pound;500 to each studentship towards research expenses.??? Unspent funds can be repurposed on further students or recruitment costs.&nbsp; Wellcome wishes to ensure a greater diversity of students (in relation to socio-economic background and ethnicity) progress to postgraduate research.&nbsp;<br> Over 5 years of the Programme we encourage organisations to aim for:&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> <br> -At least 50% of students recruited to the programme to be from underrepresented or disadvantaged groups, depending on priorities set by each organisation.&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> <br> -At least 50% of students recruited to the programme to be from non-Russell Group Universities. For the remaining 50%, organisations should consider how to recruit students from other universities as well as their own. Wellcome has included this recommended target as research indicates that most of the high-achieving STEMM graduates from minority ethnic backgrounds are located outside of Russell Group universities.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £197,340
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship Programme - Queen Mary, University of London 30 Sep 2019

<p>This award is for 6 students per year for 5 years. It includes ?a salary at the national living wage plus holiday pay and national insurance or equivalent,?as well as?funds to cover or significantly subsidise accommodation and travel (&pound;1500 outside of London and up to &pound;2000 in London).??? It includes &pound;500 to each studentship towards research expenses.??? Unspent funds can be repurposed on further students or recruitment costs.&nbsp; Wellcome wishes to ensure a greater diversity of students (in relation to socio-economic background and ethnicity) progress to postgraduate research.&nbsp;<br> Over 5 years of the Programme we encourage organisations to aim for:&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> <br> -At least 50% of students recruited to the programme to be from underrepresented or disadvantaged groups, depending on priorities set by each organisation.&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> <br> -At least 50% of students recruited to the programme to be from non-Russell Group Universities. For the remaining 50%, organisations should consider how to recruit students from other universities as well as their own. Wellcome has included this recommended target as research indicates that most of the high-achieving STEMM graduates from minority ethnic backgrounds are located outside of Russell Group universities.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £197,340
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Queen Mary University of London

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship Programme - University of Bristol 30 Sep 2019

<p>This award is for 6 students per year for 5 years. It includes ?a salary at the national living wage plus holiday pay and national insurance or equivalent,?as well as?funds to cover or significantly subsidise accommodation and travel (&pound;1500 outside of London and up to &pound;2000 in London).??? It includes &pound;500 to each studentship towards research expenses.??? Unspent funds can be repurposed on further students or recruitment costs.&nbsp; Wellcome wishes to ensure a greater diversity of students (in relation to socio-economic background and ethnicity) progress to postgraduate research.&nbsp;<br> Over 5 years of the Programme we encourage organisations to aim for:&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> <br> -At least 50% of students recruited to the programme to be from underrepresented or disadvantaged groups, depending on priorities set by each organisation.&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> <br> -At least 50% of students recruited to the programme to be from non-Russell Group Universities. For the remaining 50%, organisations should consider how to recruit students from other universities as well as their own. Wellcome has included this recommended target as research indicates that most of the high-achieving STEMM graduates from minority ethnic backgrounds are located outside of Russell Group universities.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £166,500
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Bristol

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship Programme - University of Leicester 30 Sep 2019

<p>This award is for 6 students per year for 5 years. It includes ?a salary at the national living wage plus holiday pay and national insurance or equivalent,?as well as?funds to cover or significantly subsidise accommodation and travel (&pound;1500 outside of London and up to &pound;2000 in London).??? It includes &pound;500 to each studentship towards research expenses.??? Unspent funds can be repurposed on further students or recruitment costs.&nbsp; Wellcome wishes to ensure a greater diversity of students (in relation to socio-economic background and ethnicity) progress to postgraduate research.&nbsp;<br> Over 5 years of the Programme we encourage organisations to aim for:&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> <br> -At least 50% of students recruited to the programme to be from underrepresented or disadvantaged groups, depending on priorities set by each organisation.&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> <br> -At least 50% of students recruited to the programme to be from non-Russell Group Universities. For the remaining 50%, organisations should consider how to recruit students from other universities as well as their own. Wellcome has included this recommended target as research indicates that most of the high-achieving STEMM graduates from minority ethnic backgrounds are located outside of Russell Group universities.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £166,500
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leicester

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship Programme - University of Nottingham 30 Sep 2019

<p>This award is for 6 students per year for 5 years. It includes ?a salary at the national living wage plus holiday pay and national insurance or equivalent,?as well as?funds to cover or significantly subsidise accommodation and travel (&pound;1500 outside of London and up to &pound;2000 in London).??? It includes &pound;500 to each studentship towards research expenses.??? Unspent funds can be repurposed on further students or recruitment costs.&nbsp; Wellcome wishes to ensure a greater diversity of students (in relation to socio-economic background and ethnicity) progress to postgraduate research.&nbsp;<br> Over 5 years of the Programme we encourage organisations to aim for:&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> <br> -At least 50% of students recruited to the programme to be from underrepresented or disadvantaged groups, depending on priorities set by each organisation.&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> <br> -At least 50% of students recruited to the programme to be from non-Russell Group Universities. For the remaining 50%, organisations should consider how to recruit students from other universities as well as their own. Wellcome has included this recommended target as research indicates that most of the high-achieving STEMM graduates from minority ethnic backgrounds are located outside of Russell Group universities.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £166,500
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Nottingham

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship Programme - University of Cambridge 30 Sep 2019

<p>This award is for 6 students per year for 5 years. It includes ?a salary at the national living wage plus holiday pay and national insurance or equivalent,?as well as?funds to cover or significantly subsidise accommodation and travel (&pound;1500 outside of London and up to &pound;2000 in London).??? It includes &pound;500 to each studentship towards research expenses.??? Unspent funds can be repurposed on further students or recruitment costs.&nbsp; Wellcome wishes to ensure a greater diversity of students (in relation to socio-economic background and ethnicity) progress to postgraduate research.&nbsp;<br> Over 5 years of the Programme we encourage organisations to aim for:&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> <br> -At least 50% of students recruited to the programme to be from underrepresented or disadvantaged groups, depending on priorities set by each organisation.&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> <br> -At least 50% of students recruited to the programme to be from non-Russell Group Universities. For the remaining 50%, organisations should consider how to recruit students from other universities as well as their own. Wellcome has included this recommended target as research indicates that most of the high-achieving STEMM graduates from minority ethnic backgrounds are located outside of Russell Group universities.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £166,500
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge