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Results

Open Access Awards 2017/18 30 Sep 2018

Not available

Amount: £21,050
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Birkbeck University of London

Speech perception in amusia. 17 Sep 2015

Amusia is a disorder characterized by impaired pitch discrimination, which interferes with both music and speech perception in the laboratory. However, paradoxically, amusics do not report problems with speech perception in everyday life. We hypothesize that amusics compensate for their deficit by focusing on durational information in speech, which provides cues to some of the same structural elements marked by pitch changes. Here we propose to develop a behavioural and functional magnetic reson ance imaging battery designed to test this compensatory hypothesis. Lexical stress perception, prosody perception, and speech-in-noise perception tested will be tested in three different conditions: with unaltered stimuli, with only pitch cues, and with only durational cues. We predict that amusics will be impaired only on the conditions containing only pitch cues. We further predict that in amusics the pattern of activation elicited when both pitch and duration cues are present will closely res emble the pattern when only durational cues are present, while in control subjects pitch- and duration-tracking networks will be equally represented. The development of this testing paradigm would enable evaluation of pitch and duration processing during speech perception in a variety of populations.

Amount: £98,068
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Birkbeck University of London

Open access publishing costs 2014/15. 15 Sep 2014

Not available

Amount: £13,891
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Birkbeck University of London

Institutional Strategic Support Fund 07 Sep 2016

Not available

Amount: £900,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Birkbeck University of London

The reception and application of degeneration theory and the concept of atavism in Scandinavian racial sciences, literature, cultural debate, and satire, 1880-1922 10 May 2016

The objective of my doctoral thesis will be to examine how degeneration theory, as both a scientific and cultural concept, was received and disseminated into Scandinavian racial biology and anthropology, literature, cultural debate, and satire. I will contend that degeneration theory may be viewed as a prism reflecting the relationship between nineteenth- and early twentieth-century science and culture: culture popularising science through periodicals, satire, and literature, and science examining and diagnosing culture. Furthermore, this project aims to broaden the geographical and cultural scope of degeneration studies by delineating the unique character of Scandinavian degeneration theory, strongly emphasising heredity over environment as the main cause of degeneration. I will also juxtapose the notion of late nineteenth-century British, French, German, and Italian degenerationist thought as closed systems of knowledge with a wider, more inclusive network of mutual contributions between European scientists, critics and authors. I will be focusing on the time period between 1880 and 1922, as the spectre of degeneration began to emerge in Scandinavian debate in the 1880s, and the study will conclude with the founding of the Swedish National Institute for Eugenics in 1922, which positioned Scandinavia at the forefront of European research into the mechanisms of racial heredity.

Amount: £89,829
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Birkbeck University of London

Data Worlds and Futures: Archives, Bioinformation and Evidence 27 Jun 2018

As body fragments, tissue samples and DNA sequences are progressively transformed into highly mobile and replicable data, bioinformation raises urgent questions about the entanglement of (life and) death with the materialities and mechanisms of data worlds. This project explores the relation between bioinformation, infrastructures and evidence in relation to forensic archival practices and data processing. It examines the social lives of data through practitioners’ day-to-day activities, social practices of collection, storage and use through associations that privilege particular data types and configurations. An integrated programme of activities will: 1) establish a research network of bioinformation scholars; 2) engage forensic specialists and data scientists in two collaborative workshops to explore the digitisation and storage of biomaterials and the algorithmic applications used to interpret data and produce evidence; 3) produce exploratory empirical research at a forensic services provider and repository, as a background case study to analyse digitisation and data processing in forensic research and forensic service provision. This project will open up major areas of enquiry that will improve public understandings of evidence intersecting forensic science, genetic profiling, and algorithmic processing. It will foster new avenues in bioinformation research, data policy and algorithmic governance in the field of health and wellbeing.

Amount: £29,084
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Birkbeck University of London

Waiting Times 01 Feb 2017

This project brings together an interdisciplinary team to investigate waiting as a cultural and psychosocial concept, and an embodied and historical experience, in order to understand the temporalities of healthcare. It represents a fundamental rethinking of the relation between time and care through a critical analysis of waiting in the modern period. Working across Medical Humanities and Psychosocial Studies, we will uncover the history, cultural representation, and psychosocial organisation of delayed and impeded time, from 1860 to the present. This work will underpin focused investigations of ‘watchful waiting’ in current general practice, psychotherapy, and end of life care. We ask which models of time operate within healthcare practices and develop new models of durational temporality to conceptualise how waiting can operate as a form of careful attention, historically and in the present. Contextualising these healthcare practices within broader social organisations of time, we open up the meanings, potentialities, and difficulties of waiting in current times. Through academic publications and extensive public engagement, we will reframe debates about waiting in and for healthcare, moving beyond the urgent need to reduce waiting times in the NHS, towards a more comprehensive understanding of the relation between waiting, care, and changing experiences of time.

Amount: £636,821
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Birkbeck University of London

Life and Death in Early Modern Philosophy 29 Feb 2016

Proposal Summary In collaboration with a group of European colleagues, I am applying for a grant to run an international conference on Life and Death in Early Modern Philosophy at Birkbeck College London, from 14-16 April 2016. The conference aims to deepen cultural and philosophical understanding of the interconnections between changing scientific conceptions of life and death and normative conceptions of a healthy life, in early modern Europe. It is sometimes difficult to remember that early modern natural philosophers radically disagreed about what is and is not alive. (Some held that all natural things, stones as much as human beings, are living.) We want to know how their views on this topic were reflected in ethical debates about what it is to live healthily, and how ethical conceptions in turn shaped arguments about the nature of life and death. Further key goals: To extend our understanding of how early modern, philosophical conceptions of a healthy life can inform contemporary debates, e.g. concerning a healthy relation to the environment. To agree a set of research questions for further study. To initiate an international research network To publish a selection of the papers presented at the conference

Amount: £4,871
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Birkbeck University of London

Cultures of Harm in Institutions of Care. Historical and Contemporary Perspectives 29 Feb 2016

This two-day event titled ‘Cultures of Harm in Institutions of Care: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives’ brings together scholars from around the world working in the humanities, social sciences and medicine to share new research on this pressing and topical social issue that has been seriously under-researched by historians. Uniquely, we will take a multi-disciplinary approach to address different types of institution - hospitals, psychiatric facilities, asylums, care homes and children's homes - at different periods of history from the mid eighteenth century to the present day. Our ultimate aim is to forge a crucible of rigorous cutting-edge scholarship that will not only lead to a far deeper understanding of how systemic abuse is brought about and perpetuated in institutions, but which will have the potential to inform public policy and official inquiries. More specifically, we will: Explore continuities and change over time and within different cultural and institutional contexts Create an interdisciplinary network from which other events and publications can be launched Edit a special journal issue or a volume of essays based on selected conference papers (talks are already underway with interested publishers) Launch an ongoing programme of workshops and public events.

Amount: £5,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Birkbeck University of London
Amount: £150,535
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Birkbeck University of London

Institutional Strategic Support Fund Phase2 FY2014/16 27 Oct 2014

The Wellcome Trust has recently awarded the University of Aberdeen £600,000 in funding to support a range of strategic research activities that fall within the Wellcome Trust's remit. Projects must fall within the remit of the Wellcome Trust and be within the strategic remit of the Aberdeen ISSF including; Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, particularly Medical Mycology Understanding the molecular basis of obesity for the development of interventions Applied Health Sciences, particularly through our Chief Scientist Office-funded Health Economics Research Unit and Health Services Research Unit. The support strategy for the fund is to: Facilitate more interdisciplinary research across the schools and institutes Enhance research impact through its translation into practice and dissemination through public engagement Enhance our Career Development Support in biomedical research

Amount: £600,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Birkbeck University of London

Establishing objective measures for identifying children with Autism Spectrum Disorders using eye-tracking technology in the UK and India 09 Nov 2016

Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) contribute significantly to total years lived with disability globally. Most people with ASD in low-income countries are belatedly or never diagnosed, mainly due to the paucity of mental health specialists - hence critical years for treatment are missed. Objective measures for ASD detection are needed. Multiple cognitive markers of ASD have been identified using eye-tracking technology; testing these markers in combination holds promise for effective identification of children with ASD. This proposal aims to establish objective measures for identifying children with ASD using eye-tracking technology in high and low-income settings. Stage 1 will analyse existing eye-tracking data from the British Autism Study of Infant Siblings, to establish a combination of eye-tracking tasks that has the highest probability of identifying children with an ASD diagnosis. Stage 2 will be a case control pilot study to determine whether the same combination of markers identifies children with an ASD diagnosis in India. The feasibility and acceptability of these eye-tracking tasks will also be assessed in an Indian context. Establishing effective, acceptable and feasible methods for objectively identifying children with ASD will improve detection in these settings and translate into a greater number of children benefiting from early interventions worldwide.

Amount: £250,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Birkbeck University of London

Open access award 2015/16. 21 Sep 2015

Not available

Amount: £13,891
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Birkbeck University of London

Public health and outsiders': British responses to refugees in the twentieth century. 01 Dec 2011

This project uses public health policy towards refugees as a way into understanding the nature of health citizenship and belonging in twentieth century British society. The 1951 Refugee Convention implied a social contract between the receiving state and refugees over citizenship rights, including health citizenship. And yet experience has shown that through port-of-entry examinations, camps and the exclusion of asylum seekers from particular services, refugees have often been treated as outside the British community of health and subject to extraordinary measures. Public health policy has been enacted within two further contexts: the shifting geo-political landscapes of the Cold War, post-colonialist and post-Soviet eras, which created different waves of refugees; and the changing form and functions of the British state and welfare state which profoundly affected the influence and work of local health departments. Through using evidence from four case study groups - refugees from Naz ism in the 1930s; Displaced Persons relocated to Britain after 1945; Ugandan Asians in the 1970s and post-1991 refugees/asylum seekers the research will reconstruct public health policy towards refugees at different times and at different levels of the state, and reveal how public health was experienced by refugees themselves.

Amount: £179,171
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Birkbeck University of London

Open access award 2011/12. 20 Sep 2011

Not available

Amount: £30,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Birkbeck University of London

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship. 20 May 2011

Not available

Amount: £1,520
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Birkbeck University of London

Insights into pore-formation from studies of Clostridium perfringens Epsilon-toxin. 01 Oct 2009

Clostridium perfringens epsilon-toxin is uniquely lethal and exquisitely specific. It causes pulpy kidney disease which in unvaccinated livestock can devastate herds in a few days. Pathological changes associated with epsilon-toxin occur mainly in the brain, and it binds MDCK and rat brain synaptosomal cells. Our structure of the monomeric proto-toxin revealed that it is a beta-pore-forming toxin. This family generally shows activity against a broad range of cell types with much larger lethal doses than epsilon-toxin. Understanding why epsilon-toxin shows this atypical behaviour could help the design of a specific, efficient cytolytic agent. We will study oligomerization and receptor interaction. Micro-array analysis has revealed candidate genes for epsilon-toxin sensitivity. We will use siRNA to suppress expression of these genes in MDCK cells and assess their contribution to toxin recognition. We will mutate residues previously identified by structure comparison and conser vation analysis to assess their involvement in receptor interaction. We will determine the heptamer structure by cryo-electron microscopy and crystallography. We already have promising negative stain EM images. Residues revealed to be in the heptamer interface will be mutated and any changes in oligomerization investigated. Non-oligomerizing variants will be used in models of disease to assess their suitability as molecular vaccines.

Amount: £308,240
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Birkbeck University of London

A direct electron detector for electron cryo-microscopy. 08 May 2013

The field of electron cryo-microscopy (cryo EM) is playing an increasingly important role in structural molecular and cellular biology, owing to advances in hardware and software that improve the image quality and facilitate the work. A major limitation has been the low quality of image recording, because of the low contrast and high radiation sensitivity of biological samples. Digital detectors are essential for high-throughput data collection, but the commonly used CCD detectors have worse res olution than photographic film. They convert electrons into visible light for signal recording, and this conversion degrades the image quality. Recent developments have led to commercially available direct electron detectors giving far superior performance for EM, with excellent test results already published. They provide information to the theoretical limit of resolution, whereas CCD images lack the higher resolution details. The signal/noise ratio of direct detectors at maximum resolution is at least 10-fold superior, providing major advantages for both single particles and cryo tomography. Since cryo EM operates at the limits of detection for delicate biological structures, this instrumental advance makes a vast difference to feasibility, resolution and efficiency of data collection. The resulting improvements in biological output lead to a much better use of expensive facilities.

Amount: £387,500
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Birkbeck University of London

Open access award 2013/14. 16 Sep 2013

Not available

Amount: £30,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Birkbeck University of London