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Results

Cremation Archive Cataloguing Project 25 Nov 2016

The principal objective of this project is to catalogue and make accessible for research archive material of the Cremation Society of Great Britain. This will provide an invaluable resource for academic research by various disciplines into cremation and society's disposal of its dead. The Cremation Society of Great Britain first deposited journals and part of its archive with Durham University in 1998. These were catalogued and made available for research. The Society then made a further substantial addition to that material in 2015, which now needs to be catalogued. The material covers all aspects of the Society's administration dating back to the late 19th century, the provision of its facilities for members, including funding schemes, and the development of the crematoria themselves. It also includes records of the International Cremation Society, particularly their annual conferences around the world. A professionally qualified archivist will be employed for six months to: 1. Sort and produce an online catalogue of the archival material to the current best practice ISAD(G) guidelines, overseen by similarly qualified professionals. 2. Package, box and label the material using the appropriate archival-quality materials to ensure long-term preservation and accessibility of the material, with the advice of professionally-qualified conservation staff.

Amount: £21,416
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Durham

Identification of Alternative Transcript Isoform Switches in Ageing and Senescene using Next Generation Sequencing (RNA-seq) 01 Apr 2016

During my project I aim to identify genes with alternatively expressed isoforms in mice when the individuals are subject to normal ageing, and/or under calorie restricted diet ageing. I will further study the selected candidate isoform switches, such as those predicted to regulate insulin signalling for mTOR pathways, in depth, with the intention of understanding their mechanism of regulation and how this causes the debilitating effects as so commonly associated with ageing. As the calorie-restricted diet has proved to significantly increase lifespans of mice I am personally interested to find isoforms and the mechanism that results in this drastic change between the two populations. Using the results of the bioinformatics analysis I will select candidate splice switches through filtering the data based on: statistical measure; relevance to ageing; relevance to restricted diet ageing. Once identified, the isoform switching regulatory mechanism will be studied using mini-gene constructs and designed primers to confirm the alternative events across ageing from mouse RNAs. In the future site directed mutagenesis will be used to identify the regulatory elements involved. These results could be used to target regulation of specific isoforms that may play roles in causing age-related cellular loss of function and cell senescence.

Amount: £2,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Durham

Human Cloning and Stem Cell Research Through the Medium of Law. 15 Jan 2014

The project uses Law as a medium to inform, inspire and involve 16-18 year old students in exploring conceptual, social and ethical issues related to human cloning and stem cell research. Law represents one of the most important means by which society decides and communicates its values, so offers an ideal medium for debate. The project will deliver events in three streams: one on stem cell research in 2014; a second on human cloning in 2015; and a third involving dissemination in 2016. Stre ams 1 and 2 each comprise three days: one teacher preparation, one student preparation and one law-in-action workshop. Student preparation days will provide scientific background knowledge. Law-in-action workshops will involve student participation in a mock parliamentary debate (stream 1) and a mock court case (stream 2). Students' and teachers' understandings of the science and responses to events will be measured using education research methodologies. Stream 3 will disseminate outcomes via p ublication of research findings and CPD for teachers and lecturers, enabling replication of Stream 1 and 2 events. The principal objective is to develop young people's conceptual, ethical and social understanding of arguments/issues surrounding stem cell research and human cloning by providing insights into the means by which our legal system addresses and/or resolves controversies. This will be achieved by providing knowledge and opportunities to engage in constructive, structured debate and discussion. Participants will be better equipped as active members of a society in which these technologies may feature as sources for medical treatments.

Amount: £29,961
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Durham

Hearing the Voice 2. 23 Jul 2015

Not available

Amount: £2,692,090
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Durham

The Hububb Hub at Wellcome Collection. 04 Mar 2014

The urge to be busy defines modern life. Rest can seem hard to find, whether in relation to an exhausted body, a racing mind or a hectic city. Should we slow down, or should we embrace intense activity? What effects do each of these states have on the health of our bodies and minds? Such questions frequently find their way into media reports and everyday conversations, but there has never been any sustained interdisciplinary attempt to answer them. In The Hubbub Hub, international experts investigating hubbub and rest at different scales will, for the first time, be gathered in a shared space – to breathe new life into the questions we ask about rest and busyness. Our ambitious project will be nourished by the unique resources available in Wellcome Collection and the noisy city beyond, and from the start the public and Wellcome Trust staff will be at its heart. The Hub is the uniquely versatile space we need to perform rigorous, creative research and to stage our scientific and artistic experiments, data-gathering and public events. While neuroscientists study the ‘resting’ brain, artists will explore the borders between signal, sound and noise, psychologists will track the activity of our bodies, and social scientists will map the city’s noise and silences. Our multidisciplinary team will transcend boundaries of scientific and artistic practice, leaving a rich legacy for academic and creative inquiry, clinical practice and public policy, and for the Hub’s future as a crucible for world-leading interdisciplinary research.

Amount: £550,957
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Durham

'Frissure': a book about a scar. 16 Jul 2012

Following a diagnosis of breast cancer and resulting mastectomy the poet, Kathleen Jamie approached artist, Brigid Collins, 'to be her eyes'. The ensuing sittings and conversations between poet and artist began as an exploration of line, initially Kathleen's mastectomy scar line, but they also became a 'laying down of layers', of reciprocity, of experience and, ultimately, of transformation. These sittings prepared the ground from which a significant body of work began to emerge, consist ing of a series of prose poems and of artworks. At its heart lies a consideration of a particular way of looking. It contrasts the artist's looking with the 'medical gaze'. In these works the subject: the scar, or line, is not the end of the story, but instead it leads out of loss, and back into the natural world, and the beautiful. This work has been developed in association with discussions during Kathleen's fellowship at Durham University's Centre for Medical Humanities which is supp orting the development of an art book entitled 'Frissure'. The book combines the prose poems and the images to create an object of beauty that is intended to explore the disruption of the body and its transformation as a result of surgery.

Amount: £4,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Durham

Identity and role of integral membrane proteins of Nuclear Envelope Precursor Vesicles in Membrane Fusion and Nuclear Pore Assembly. 10 Nov 2008

Two distinct Nuclear Envelope Precursor (NEP) vesicles in Xenopus eggs, NEP-A and NEP-B, are essential for Nuclear Envelope (NE) assembly. Recently, we showed that fusion between NEP-A and NEP-B initiates the formation of Nuclear Pore Complexes (NPCs). This might be because essential components of NPCs are segregated between each NEP and can only interact following vesicle fusion. Alternatively, remodelling of membranes during fusion might topologically favour NPC assembly. The proposed investig ations will test these hypothesise. Our first objective is to use a proteomic approach (MudPIT) to identify NEP-A and NEP-B specific proteins. Our second objective is to use a rational bioinformatics approach to identify those proteins in NEP-A that could be involved in NPC assembly (we already know which NEP-B proteins are involved in NPC assembly). Our third objective is to use immunogold E.M, live confocal imaging and protein-protein interaction assays to further refine the list of NEP-A prot eins likely to be involved in NPC assembly (because they are located within NPC assembly intermediates and/or interact with NPC proteins). Our final objective is to use functional assays to determine whether, within a final list of candidate proteins, some or all are necessary for NPC assembly.

Amount: £222,069
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Durham

Biomedical vacation scholarship. 29 May 2009

Not available

Amount: £2,880
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Durham

MA in History of Medicine 29 Aug 2008

Not available

Amount: £21,438
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Durham

Value in People award. 18 Jul 2007

Not available

Amount: £150,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Durham
Amount: £1,500
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Durham

The effect of redox modulators on the LINC complex in metastatic breast cancer cells 31 May 2018

The LINC complex is a nuclear membrane protein complex, which controls nuclear stiffness. This protein complex has been found to be deregulated in metastatic breast cancer cells, decreasing cell stiffness, and therefore increasing the cells’ ability to deform its nucleus and pass through pores and restricted spaces. This project aims to characterize the LINC complex of metastatic breast cancer cells, and to study the modifications that occur in its quaternary structure when cells are treated with drugs that alter their redox potential. Because this complex is stabilized by disulphide bonds, we propose that treatment of metastatic cells with drugs that modify the redox status of the cell and cause ER stress could have an effect on the LINC complex and restore its function. Thapsigargin is a natural endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress inducer, and this increased ER stress will trigger apoptotic signalling pathways in the cell. Function restoration of the LINC complex would allow control over metastatic breast cancer cell migration, preventing the tumour from spreading and focalizing it in a specific area. The results obtained from this study may open up new treatment opportunities and the restriction of cell migration may improve the effectivity of current clinical treatments.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Durham

Development of the Durham Centre for Medical Humanities 30 Sep 2017

With the support of the Wellcome Trust, the Durham Centre for Medical Humanities will become a nexus for world class medical humanities research. Spanning disciplines and periods, this research seeks to improve human health through an enhanced understanding of human experience. Over the next five years we will extend the significance and impact of existing medical humanities initiatives at Durham, while also fostering new ideas and projects within four distinct strands of work. Our central goals are to develop more effective ways of understanding human experience; to build interdisciplinary research projects that will enable us to influence clinical and health research, practice and policy; to transform views about and approaches to health care research by involving multiple stakeholders; and to promote and champion our approach across disciplinary, institutional and wider research contexts. Key to achieving these ambitious and longer-term goals will be an application for Wellcome Trust Centre status to continue our work beyond the period of this award.

Amount: £1,031,135
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Durham

Optical Cannula: Development of a tool for studying the inside of tubular organs under physiologically relevant conditions by imaging from within 16 Jun 2016

Building on our recent imaging advances (refs-1-4), we will develop an optical platform to provide imaging access inside blood vessels and ‘hollow organs’ (within. Advanced confocal and widefield microscopy techniques will be combined with focus-locking and adapive field-curvature correction to facilitate large-field (hundreds of cells) high-resolution imaging of the deepest, hard to access, layers of blood vessels, overcoming the small image fields, and imaging aberrations associated with conventional approaches. Automated data collection and analysis will provide high throughput ex vivo imaging in a physiologically intact manner not previously possible. Validating our technology in both our labs, and those of our project partners, we will iteratively refine and develop our platform for use on all pathological conditions linked to cardiovascular disease, and explore uses with other tubular organs. Wider dissemination of our platform will be assured through open access portals. Our project will deliver organ scale, physiologically relevant high resolution and high speed imaging, integrated data extraction and high-throughput analytical capacity. These breakthroughs will stimulate new understandings of cardiovascular disease with immediate impact on biomedical investigations.

Amount: £301,557
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Durham

Assuring the future of medical humanities in the UK: a post-graduate conference Embodied understandings . 11 Feb 2013

Funding is requested to enable free participation in the first dedicated conference for post-graduates in Medical Humanities: Understanding human flourishing: a postgraduate medical humanities conference. 16-17 May 2013, Durham University. Front page Costs include catering and the expenses of three visiting speakers. Medical Humanities is growing rapidly with several new interdisciplinary university centres across the UK. Ensuring this continued growth and future research excellence in Medi cal Humanities requires recognition and intellectual support for the burgeoning community of postgraduates associated or self-affiliating with these new initiatives. The conference is timely in bringing together these postgraduate researchers to explore and exchange their interdisciplinary perspectives and methods on health, illness and human flourishing and to build networks and collaborative relationships for the future. A panel discussion on academic publishing will provide information and ad vice for those embarking on a career in medical humanities. The keynote speaker is Professor Stuart Murray, director of the new Centre for Medical Humanities at Leeds University. Panellists are Professor Brian Hurwitz from the Wellcome-supported Centre for Humanities and Health at Kings College, London and Dr. Deborah Kirklin, editor of the BMJ Medical Humanities journal, London, who join Professor Martyn Evans, co-director of Wellcome-supported Durham Centre for Medical Humanities

Amount: £4,350
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Durham

Pesticides and global health: an ethnographic study of agrochemical lives. 30 Jul 2014

The overall aim is to provide a qualitative account of agrochemicals' social, ethical, and political lives as they travel from point of development to point of use, to illuminate the ways they become part of local rhetorics of human health. Instead of simply tracking 'positive' and 'negative' outcomes, the objective is to understand how agrochemicals accrue types of medical, public, and policy knowledge, and thereby provide a more nuanced account of the ways in which health benefits and risks ar e constructed. Ethnographic and interview research will be conducted into the 'life' and 'death' of one product, the herbicide, paraquat, which has attracted particular controversy in academic, public, and activist circles. This also includes in Sri Lanka, where agrochemicals are implicated in three contemporary health crises (suicide, kidney disease, diabetes), extensive regulations have been put in place, and paraquat was recently banned - with varying health and economic consequences. Focusin g on paraquat as a narrative device to explore much broader themes, the research will produce a 'biographical narrative' of agrochemical use, regulations, and bans to identify tensions, frictions, and controversies, and their political, economic, and epistemological roots. Opportunities include advancing theoretical and policy-practice knowledge on agrochemicals, culture, political-economy, and global health.

Amount: £221,824
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Durham

Trust, risk and uncertainty in medicinal transactions in Sub-Saharan Africa: Integrating Behavioural Game Theory and Ethnography to develop a robust analytical framework to address a major global public health challenge. 18 Sep 2015

Medicines are at the centre of a major global public health crisis. Widespread counterfeiting and unprecedented global traffic of pharmaceuticals have created significant trust problems for patients and others, particularly where regulation is weak, with serious risks for individual and public health. We propose to develop a robust analytical framework to understand the mechanisms that foster the production of trust in medicinal transactions in sub-Saharan Africa. Our question is: how, under con ditions of uncertainty and informational asymmetry, do actors (consumers and providers) come to trust and distrust particular medicines, and how does this shape practice? Our goal is to bring together the richness of ethnographic enquiry with the powerful analytical approaches offered by Behavioural Game Theory in order to address this pressing global public health problem. This seed award application, to support the development of a full Wellcome Collaborative proposal, would be used to conduct a pilot and feasibility study in Ghana and Tanzania; collect preliminary data to underpin theoretical and methodological development; build/consolidate international academic and stake-holder partnerships; and develop local research capacity. This is particularly important given the theoretically-novel and ambitious nature of the proposed larger study and the new international, inter-disciplinary research consortium we are building.

Amount: £49,954
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Durham

The Qualitative Health Research Writing Group Network. 29 May 2015

The Qualitative Health Research Writing Group Network (QHRWGN) was created to provide a forum which addresses the writing needs of PhD students and ECRs undertaking qualitative health research in Northern England. An inaugural network event was held in October 2014 where attendees received guidance on writing qualitative health research and as a result there are now five writing groups which meet regularly, providing peer support. It is hoped that the support offered to network members can be ex tended and formalised by providing two further training opportunities over this year; a writing retreat and a one day symposium. Fifteen delegates will have the opportunity to attend a three day residential writing retreat, with a focus on producing specific outputs and the chance to receive expert guidance from Prof. Rose Barbour. The one day symposium will allow all network members to receive training on three pertinent areas; academic writing (Prof. Roweena Murray), writing for publication (P rof. Melissa Leach) and writing for policy makers (Jennifer Jeffes). Delegates will have the opportunity to present their own research. These events will develop the skills and confidence of PhD students and ECRs, positively contributing to the development of the next generation of research leaders.

Amount: £4,896
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Durham

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship. 20 May 2011

Not available

Amount: £6,840
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Durham

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship 25 Jun 2012

Not available

Amount: £1,440
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Durham