Cookies disclaimer

I agree Our site saves small pieces of text information (cookies) on your device in order to deliver better content and for statistical purposes. You can disable the usage of cookies by changing the settings of your browser. By browsing our website without changing the browser settings you grant us permission to store that information on your device.

Current Filters

Recipients:
University of Oxford

Results

Modernising Medical Microbiology: Establishing how new technologies can be optimally integrated into microbiology. 16 Sep 2008

This proposal should lead to a comprehensive web-based tool managed by the HPA which microbiologists in NHS Trusts could use to harness genomics in optimising management of local infection control and halting transmission of major pathogens. It will also provide a data/sample repository which national researchers could exploit, in conjunction with those at the cutting edge of bioinformatics, to elucidate host pathogen interactions and thus identify future targets for medical or strategic interventions. The programme of work will produce more complete descriptions of routes of pathogen transmission, which will lead to improvements in current guidelines for infection control. In terms of leadership and training, the Consortium will mature a group of young researchers excited about the genomic revolution, who have seen the techniques applied successfully and are now ready and want to go and do it themselves. These individuals will be key future leaders in microbiology and infectious diseases.

Amount: £2,829,138
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Vacation Scholarships 2008. 27 May 2008

Not available

Amount: £21,600
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Value in People Award. 17 Oct 2007

Not available

Amount: £350,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Student Elective Prize for Ms Kathryn E Newell 29 Aug 2008

Do adverse social factors in a resource poor environment impact on the aetiology, identification and treatment of multi-drug resistant (MDR) in a Tibetan refugee population?

Amount: £1,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Strategic Award for the Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics. 31 Dec 2007

The Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics was established in 1994 to undertake research into the genetic basis of common diseases. The scientific objective of the Centre is to gain insight into mechanisms controlling genetic susceptibility to human disease including the localization and identification of disease genes, functional characterization of gene variants responsible for susceptibility, understanding how gene variants contribute to risk of disease in the population and how genetic fa ctors contribute biologically to a disease process, and the development and application of new analytical tools. In order to achieve this objective the Centre has brought together multidisciplinary research groups collaborating on human and rodent genetics, genetic epidemiology and statistical genetics, functional analysis of disease genes, cell and developmental biology and structural biology. The Centre has a strong focus of expertise, equipment and resources centralized in Core groups allow ing all research groups to benefit and expand their research strategies. This grant follows the recent appointment of Professor Peter Donnelly as Centre Director and recent discussions with the Wellcome Trust on three high priority investment areas in the Centre: 1) additional computing infrastructure, 2) a Solexa sequencing machine, 3) part-funding of additional office space.

Amount: £2,020,414
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Student Elective Prize for Ms Katherine Talbot 29 Aug 2008

Are increases in intracranial pressure at high altitude correlated with acute mountain sickness?

Amount: £1,600
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Developing research capacity and leadership in East Africa from the KEMRI- Wellcome Trust Research Programme, Kenyq. 18 Feb 2008

This proposal aims to develop health-related research capacity and research leadership in East Africa out of the longstanding Wellcome Trust-funded major overseas programme in Kenya. Its central aim is to enable the KEMRI Wellcome Trust Research Programme to produce a cadre of researchers from Kenya and the East African region who are internationally competitive in developing and leading sustainable research programmes throughout the region. The key goals are (1) To provide a coherent car eer development track for health researchers in East Africa. (2) To specifically target key areas of health related research that need particular strengthening in East Africa: translational research, social science research, and clinical trials (3) To build regional research capacity through developing networks with universities and research centres within the region

Amount: £798,336
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Student Elective Prize for Mr Edmund Naylor 29 Aug 2008

An evaluation of the effectiveness of home-based treatment of Multi-Drug Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa.

Amount: £1,588
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Student Elective Prize for Mr Adam Handel 29 Aug 2008

Magnetoencephalographic (MEG) study of facial pain

Amount: £1,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Improving Health Outcomes for Looked After Children and Young People: A multi-method exploration. 14 May 2014

This research will adopt a mixed methods approach. This will include quantitative analyses of the Children Looked After dataset (www.data.gov.uk/dataset/children-looked-after-data), an audit of statutory health assessment forms, and qualitative interviews with LACYP and health and social care professionals. The project will be aided by an advisory panel compiled of LACYP, health and social care professionals, and academics who work in this field. Timeline for the research: Year one: o The y outh panel will be developed. o A review of the literature will be conducted. o The introductory background and methods chapters of the thesis will be drafted. o Research and ethical approval will be sought from authorities as required. o Participants will be recruited. o Planning and organising of field work. o Descriptive statistical analyses of the Children Looked After Database. o An audit of the health assessment forms will be started. Year two: o Quantitative analysis. o Qualit ative data collection; o Initial qualitative data analysis will be conducted concurrently with interviewing. Year three: o Data Analysis and write up. o If appropriate, revisit quantitative analysis to further investigate issues that have been raised in interviews.

Amount: £95,967
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

The role of the innate immune system in repair and regeneration following myocardial infarction. 28 Aug 2014

After myocardial infarction in the adult heart, a stereotyped innate immune response drives persistent inflammation, leading to impaired healing, scar formation, adverse remodelling and heart failure. In contrast, the murine neonatal heart heals by regeneration after injury, without scar or fibrosis. In both the adult and neonatal murine myocardium, the monocyte-macrophage system is central to control of inflammation and the switch to subsequent repair. The mechanisms by which the innate immune system mediates regeneration and/or repair following myocardial infarction is the focus of this project proposal. The specific aims are To define the effects of discrete monocyte-macrophage populations in mediating cardiac regeneration and/or repair following myocardial infarction To assess how signalling cross-talk between the heart and the monocyte-macrophage system modifies regeneration/repair following myocardial infarction

Amount: £319,816
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Identification and functional analysis of susceptibility genes in multi- factorial diseases. 15 Apr 2008

The Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics was established in 1994 to undertake research into the genetic basis of common diseases. The scientific objective of the Centre is to gain insight into mechanisms controlling genetic susceptibility to human disease including the localization and identification of disease genes, functional characterization of gene variants responsible for susceptibility, understanding how gene variants contribute to risk of disease in the population and how genetic factors contribute biologically to a disease process. In order to achieve this scientific objective the Centre's strategy was to bring together multidisciplinary research groups collaborating on human and rodent genetics, genetic epidemiology, functional analysis of disease genes, cell and developmental biology and structural biology. In addition, the Centre has a strong focus of expertise, equipment and resources centralized in Core groups allowing all research groups to benefit and expand their research strategies. The Core groups in Genomics, Molecular Cytogenetics and Microscopy, Bioinformatics and Statistical Genetics, and Transgenics provide first-rate services and perform research and development on new platform technologies as well as algorithms and databases needed to analyse complex datasets. This application is to continue our Centre status and provide funding for the running of these Core groups over the next five years.

Amount: £2,092,216
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Investigation into the functional role of ROR-gamma T in inflammatory bowel disease models. 29 Aug 2008

Mucosal immune responses are actively regulated to prevent development of harmful cell mediated immune responses, yet little is known about the cell types and cytokines involved in this regulation. Two broad approaches will be used to identify the basic mechanisms of mucosal immune regulation. In the first, a recently described murine model of colitis with similarities to Crohn's disease in man, which develops spontaneously in SCID mice restored with CD45RBhigh CD4+ T cells from normal donors and is completely prevented by co-transfer of the reciprocal CD45RBlow population, will be used to investigate mechanisms of disease induction and prevention. The mechanism of action of the regulatory CD45RBlow population will be dissected in vivo, including identification of immunosuppressive cytokines and their cellular source, which are critical for suppression of disease and effects of the CD45RBlow population on the homing properties of CD45RBhigh population. Experiments using gnotobiotic mice suggest components of the normal flora are involved in disease induction and these experiments will be extended to identify the antigen specificity of cells which cause disease and those that prevent it. The second approach will involve study of T-helper cell subset differentiation in the gastrointestinal tract in both tolerance and non-responsiveness. A TCR transgenic mouse line will be used to determine which T helper cell subsets are induced by oral tolerance regimes compared with oral immunisation and which cytokines are involved in the differentiation and effector functions of these cells. Recent evidence suggests that induction of TGF-ß and IL-10 producing regulatory cells may be an important component of oral tolerance. A genetic approach will be taken to allow the detection of IL-10 producing cells in vivo, providing information on the anatomical location of regulatory cells within the gut associated lymphoid tissue. The results of these experiments should define the rules that govern T helper cell subset differentiation in the gut, providing a basis for manipulation of T helper cell responses to ingested antigen. This may be particularly useful in a number of autoimmune diseases where induction of cells that suppress cell mediated immune responses is desirable.

Amount: £9,901
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Wellcome Trust Centre of Clinical Tropical Medicine, University of Oxford - extension 28 May 2007

The Wellcome Trust Centre for Research in Clinical Tropical Medicine, University of Oxford, proposes to continue its role in coordinating and facilitating the large programme of research carried out by the Oxford Tropical Network. This programme aims to improve the prevention, diagnosis and management of important tropical diseases through a better understanding of their pathogenesis, pathophysiology, genetics and epidemiology and the development of new treatments and vaccines. The main areas of interest are the major infectious diseases causes of morbidity and mortality in the developing world; malaria, pneumococcal disease, tuberculosis, HIV associated opportunistic infections , melioidosis, typhoid, tetanus, rickettsial diseases, dengue and viral encephalitides, as well as emergent western diseases such as hypertension and type II diabetes mellitus, thalassaemias and non-infectious problems such as poisoning and envenomation. As in previous years related basic science research will be carried out in the Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, the University Department of Paediatrics, and the Institute of Molecular Medicine, in support of epidemiological and clinical investigations in the Oxford-linked Wellcome Trust Tropical Units in Thailand, Viet Nam and Kenya and other overseas investigators and collaborators. Close links will be developed with the department of Public Health. The main role of the Oxford Centre is to provide administrative and logistic support for the overseas units and to identify, recruit, encourage and support the training of outstanding young clinical scientists in Oxford and in its linked tropical units. Continuing support for the Oxford Centre is justified by the achievements of the Oxford Tropical Network which, over the past five years, has yielded more than 400 peer-reviewed publications which have been influential in changing health policy and medical practice, and has trained 22 young medical scientists.

Amount: £186,023
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Initiating Dissemination / Professional Engagement - Child & Newborn Health Group KEMRI / Wellcome Trust Programme, Nairobi. 18 Jun 2007

Our key goals in initiating a series of engagement activities are: 1) To host a joint Ministry of Health (MoH) / Child and Newborn Health (CNH) Group (KEMRI / Wellcome Trust) meeting to discuss early findings of attempts to introduce evidence based guidelines for care for sick children in hospitals and to report on lessons learned. 2) To host a Child and Newborn Health Group Conference with partners from the Ministry of Health, The University of Nairobi, The Kenya Paediatric Association and other medical training institutions to present research findings and discuss their implications for the future direction of and partnerships for research in these areas. 3) To survey medical trainees to establish their exposure to, access to and appreciation of research evidence. 4) To develop a pilot problem-based interface for medical trainees to illustrate the role and contribution of research to improving clinical care of the very sick child in low-income settings.

Amount: £19,738
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Controversies in Motor Neuron Disease Research and Practice. 06 Feb 2007

Motor neuron disease is an age-dependent neurodegenerative disease characterised by loss of motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord leading to rapidly progressive weakness and wasting of voluntary muscle with devastating consequences. Patients develop progressive disability, dependence on others for activities of daily living and ultimately succumb to respiratory failure a median of approximately 20 months from diagnosis. MND, also known as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a complex disease at every level; clinical, aetiological, and in its effects on people living with the disease. Approximately 10% of affected individuals have a genetic form of MND, while in the remaining 90% the cause is unknown. The most popular model for sporadic ALS/MND is as a multifactorial disease with a complex genetic susceptibility profile acting as a foundation for environmentally driven or age-dependant stochastic triggers for cell death. However, many of the key questions about the disease are unresolved and there is considerable divergence in expert opinion. These 'faultlines' of divergent opinion in MND research and practice may actually be the very key to advancing our understanding of the disease and will be the subject of this meeting. The specific aim of this Masterclass is to bring together clinicians and basic scientists to discuss these fundamental areas which could provide a 'way in' to disease pathogenesis and a way forward for collaborative research.

Amount: £33,825
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Open Access Award. 31 Oct 2006

Not available

Amount: £30,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Do no harm: A neural and ethical analysis of actions and omissions in moral decision-making. 14 May 2014

I will utilize a combination of experimental tools to investigate the neural mechanisms driving systematic decision patterns related to the heuristic to do no harm. I initially develop a laboratory model of moral decision-making, demonstrating a greater aversion to harmful actions relative to harmful omissions in decisions involving real harmful consequences to an anonymous other person. Next, healthy participants will perform the task in an fMRI scanner, where I will use the model to test compe ting hypotheses that asymmetries in harm aversion for actions vs. omissions result from either (i) impoverished neural representations of the consequences of omissions, or (ii) stronger negative representations of harmful actions. I will then investigate whether asymmetries between harmful actions and omissions can be modulated by the neurotransmitter serotonin using a commonly prescribed antidepressant drug. Finally, I will explore the ethical and policy implications of my research findings. Du ring this time, I plan to apply for the Wellcome Trust-POST Fellowship where I can engage with a parliamentary audience on intervention strategies for relevant public health issues. My research will culminate in a number of research papers and a final dissertation describing the empirical findings and their implications for policy and practice.

Amount: £87,645
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

The Politics of Psychiatry?: A Critical Examination of Seven Influential Sources in the History of Autism. 13 May 2014

This project critically examines the claims and context of seven influential sources in Autism's history and their impact upon scientific and public understanding. The goal is in each instance to distill scientific from rhetorical claims, document their disparate modes of acceptance, and make this distinction explicit. These sources are: (1) Leo Kanner's written corpus and affiliated records held by the Johns Hopkins University and the American Psychiatric Association. (2) Hans Asperger's surviv ing written corpus and affiliated records. (3) Uta Frith and Rab Houston's history of the 18th century Scottish court case of Hugh Blair of Borgue and the case itself held by the National Archives of Scotland. (4) Bruno Bettelheim's written corpus and associated records of the Orthogenic School held by the University of Chicago. (5) Bernard Rimland's written corpus and affiliated records. (6) Ari Ne'eman and related Autism activist's written corpus. (7) Laurence Mottron and related pro-Autism scientist's written corpus.

Amount: £109,566
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Advancing cognitive therapy for anxiety disorders and PTSD 05 Apr 2016

The proposed research addresses two of the major problems in psychotherapy research: How can effective psychological treatments be made available to the large number of people with mental health problems?, and How can researchers make rapid progress in making the treatments even more effective? The applicants have developed leading psychological therapies for three anxiety-related disorders (social anxiety disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder and panic disorder). They now propose to harness the power of the internet to solve both problems. Internet-delivered versions of the treatments will be developed and evaluated that require much less therapist time and can be delivered anywhere. Dissemination and evaluation of the treatments within NHS Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services will create a large database that will enable rigorous study of moderators and mediators of therapeutic change to identify targets for further improvements. Modifications of the treatment will then be evaluated in experimental treatment studies. The work will help realise the population level mental health benefits of previous Trust investment in psychological therapy research and align with the Trust’s new focus on maximizing the application of research to improve health by focusing on new product development and the uptake of patient-oriented research advances.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford