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Results

Retinoic acid receptor a agonists for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease 31 Jan 2010

Retinoic acid receptor a agonists for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. The current licensed treatments for Alzheimer's disease improve the symptoms that people experience but do not alter the progression of the underlying disease changes in the brain.Most of the attempts to develop new treatments have focused on altering deposits of the amyloid protein in the brain, but despite more than a decade of intensive research this has still not yielded any new therapies in the clinic. The studies of Dr Jonathan Corcoran of King's College London highlight a specific retinoic acid receptor (RAR)a agonist as a novel and exciting target for the development of new treatments. This agonist has two mechanisms of action - it regulates amyloid deposits in the brain and also plays a key role in the survival of neurons. In their project they will generate novel RARa agonists for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

Amount: £354,795
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London

Identifying low frequency and rare genetic variation involved in type 2 diabetes using next generation sequencing data. 24 May 2010

To answer my research question, I will utilize the following datasets: Dataset 1: Whole genome sequence from 1500 Type 2 diabetes patients and 1500 characterised controls at 4 fold coverage. Dataset 2: Targeted sequencing of 50-200 selected genes from 480 young onset diabetes patients and 480 normo-glycaemic controls, at 50 fold coverage. Dataset 3: Variant data from the publicly available 1000 genomes project My project will then proceed in four stages. In Stage 1 I will use NGS data fr om datasets 1-3 to identify low frequency and rare variants in the coding regions of selected candidate genes. In Stage 2 I will annotate these variants including their likely functional effect and genomic context. In Stage 3 I will prioritise variants for follow up using a combination of criteria including nominal association (p<0.05). In Stage 4 I will follow up prioritised rare variants by genotyping in additional samples of up to 50,000 cases and equivalent numbers of controls. I will also t est the impact these variants have on beta-cell function and insulin resistance in well phenotyped non-diabetic cohorts. My fellowship will improve understanding of biological mechanisms involved in diabetes and may lead to stratification of individuals for treatment or preventative measures.

Amount: £250,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

The ethics of organ retrieval: Goals, rights and responsibilities. 21 Sep 2010

(1) To provide a unique forum for a diverse set of professionals involved in organ donation and transplantation, and interested members of the general public to come together to discuss ethical issues raised by organ retrieval and the impact these continue to have on the delivery of clinical transplant services and transplant outcome. (2) To provide an opportunity for senior clinicians involved in organ donation and transplantation to set out the clinical goals of organ donation and transplantation and to engage with academic lawyers, ethicists, policy makers, key stakeholders and interested members of the general public about the difficult challenges current ethical, legal and regulatory policy frameworks present. (3) To promote cross disciplinary collaboration. (4) To highlight key issues affecting deceased donor organ retrieval including: a. Indications for referral for brainstem death testing and organ donation; b. Organ donation following diagnosis of cardiac death (DCD); c. Organ donation following diagnosis of brainstem death (DBD); d. Donor organ optimisation; e. Conducting research on the deceased. (5) To gather consensus views which inform public policy: (6) To develop potential public policy proposals specifically addressing: a. Whether the UK should implement a system of 'required referral for brainstem death testing and organ donation on the basis of clinical triggers'; b. Donor organ optimisation. (7) To publish a 'special issue' of the journal Clinical Ethics entitled 'The ethics of organ retrieval' which will include complex clinical case studies and papers which examine empirical ethics, law and public policy in this domain, highlighting disparate and consensus views.

Amount: £3,500
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London

"Feeling better": Recovery and recuperation in Early Modern England, c1580-1720 31 Aug 2010

I intend to spend ten days in London and Cambridge conducting preliminary research into my postdoctoral project, which is about recovery and recuperation in early modern England. The postdoctoral project has four aims: firstly. to investigate medical perceptions of recovery. a ski rig how doctors explained the processes by which the body overcame illness. Secondly, to examine the management of recuperation, exploring how doctors and laypeople cared for the recovering patient. Thirdly, the project will unravel the experience of recovery from the patient's perspective, taking an emotional, physical, and spiritual angle. Fourthly, the project will explore the family's experience of recovery, examining the celebrations that marked a loved one's return to health. During the ten days of preliminary research, my goals are, firstly, to carry out a review of the historiography of early modem recovery. Secondly, to examine a sample of primary sources to assess their potential for use in my postdoctoral project. Thirdly. I will familiarize myself with some of the repositories and archives at the University of Cambridge, so that I will be well prepared for undertaking the postdoctoral project at this institution. Ultimately. the research will help strengthen mv postdoctoral proposal by clarifying and developing my objectives and methods.

Amount: £1,429
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

Capacity building in the medical humanities 13 Jul 2010

In order to build capacity in the field of the Medical Humanities and to provide career pathways for early career researchers, the Centre for the Humanities and Health is seeking to secure funding towards 2 fees only bursaries for its new MSc Medical Humanities at King's

Amount: £5,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London

"Stress, shock and adaptation in the twentieth century" to be held in Exeter NLM and NIH on 9-10 November 2010 31 Aug 2010

This workshop will explore what happens when the concept of "stress" enters into medical discourse and policy. While there have long been associations made between modernity and illness, the concept of stress has intensified and refocused such debates. No longer restricted to maladapted individuals and groups, the problem of stress is shared by all, becoming the most widely utilized medical concept in the twentieth century. In this workshop we will be exploring the scientific, intellectual and political decisions underlying the emergence of the stress concept; its uses in making novel linkages between disciplines such as ecology, neurology, physiology, psychiatry, public health, and a range of social sciences; and its application in a variety of sites or places, such as the battlefield, the office-building, the transport system, the hospital, and home. The workshop will bring together leading historians of science and medicine, exploring many different perspectives on stress - from scientists and physicians, to health activists, urban planning and environmental design professions, industry, policy makers, and regulators. The very diversity of .conceptions and varied applications of "stress," ensures its value as a means of exploring how social, political, and economic concerns have shaped the production and application of scientific knowledge.

Amount: £5,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

"'In sickness and in Health': Medical history workshop for postgraduate historians" to be held atthe University of Exeter on 9-10 September 2010 13 Apr 2010

The workshop has five aims. Firstly, to bring together medical history postgraduates from around the country who are working on a variety of topics and time-periods. Centres for Medical History are often relatively isolated within their History Departments, and it would therefore be advantageous to provide an opportunity for strengthening ties between medical scholars, through the forging of new contacts. Secondly, the workshop will identify a number of common themes which are evident in medical histories. This will enable students to consider familiar interpretative questions in a fresh light. The third aim is to engage with a diverse range of research methodologies. Students working in different fields tend to have contrasting research backgrounds and areas of expertise. It will therefore be fruitful for students to share their research strategies in the anticipation that they will be able to incorporate effective new methods into their work. Fourthly, the workshop will furnish postgraduates with the intellectual support they need for undertaking their studies. This will be achieved through the delivery of question and answer sessions about academic and practical challenges. Finally, the workshop will provide a forum for the Trust to promote its longer-term research support strategies for doctoral and post-doctoral research.

Amount: £4,920
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

"Human heredity in the twentieth century" to be held at the University of Exeter on 2-4 September 2010 15 Feb 2010

The idea that physical and mental characters can be attributed to discrete hereditary factors or "genes" has profoundly affected our understanding of human nature and society. The perceived social implications of genetic knowledge have, in turn, had a profound effect on the development of scientific methods, concepts, theories and technologies. Modern knowledge about human heredity, however, does not only stem from the discipline of genetics. Various fields such as medicine, anthropology, and psychology have maintained and developed their own ways of analysing and explaining the phenomena of heredity through technologies such as intelligence testing, surveys of fertility, patterns of disease, blood groups and linguistic boundaries. The workshop will produce a much needed and comprehensive picture of the various scientific, medical and political practices that have shaped the notion of human heredity from 1900 to the mid-1970s (when new biotechnologies opened up a new age of human heredity). It will focus on developments that have hitherto attracted little attention in the historiography of human heredity, and which shed new light on the interaction between science and society and on the transfer of knowledge and practices between scientific fields.

Amount: £5,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

A critical study of John Money's contribution to the sexological concept of 'paraphilia' 15 Feb 2010

The project undertakes a critical investigation of the understudied concept of 'paraphilia' in the work of New Zealand-born sexologist, John William Money (1921-2006). I trace Money's debt to the foundational European texts of sexology of the late-nineteenth century that first described the sexual 'perversions' and posed them as a social and moral threat under the umbrella discourse of 'degeneration'. I explore the logic of Money's theorization of abnormal sexual development, and the practices for treating sex offenders that he pioneered at Johns Hopkins University in the 1980s and 1990s. By bringing attention to the importance of Money's work on this subject, the commonplace assumption that twentieth-century sexology is very far removed from the presuppositions and values underlying its nineteenth-century counterpart is called into question. Moreover, the project demonstrates the extent to which the significance of the diagnostic category of 'paraphilia' in twentieth-century Anglo-American sexology has been overlooked. Finally, the project offers a fuller and more accurate picture of a key figure in the history of sexual medicine than is currently available, as most published scholarship on Money focuses uniquely on his contribution to debates about gender identity, notably, his controversial involvement with the 'John/Joan' case in the 1960s.

Amount: £4,700
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

"On balance: an interdisciplinary conference on notions of balance and stability in health and medicine" to be held on 12-13 May 2010 at the University of Exeter 15 Feb 2010

The immediate aim of this conference is to bring together scholars from a range of disciplines in order to reflect on and interrogate the role of concepts such as balance and stability in debates about health and disease, both in historical and modern cultural terms. Our purpose is to include studies that relate to all periods and places, including Western and Eastern theories and treatments of disease and from ancient through to modern formulations of balance and health. As longer term goals, we intend both to publish the proceedings of the conference in some form and to develop an ambitious inter-disciplinary research programme on the medical, political and personal implications of the notion of balance within medicine.

Amount: £5,331
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

"The burthen of the mortal body: Life, death, sickness and health in the Early Modern period" to be held at the University of Exeter on 23-24 August 2010 18 Jan 2010

The conference has four main objectives: Firstly to identify, promote and publish new research in this subject area; Secondly, to introduce early career scholars working in the same field, and create and develop a network of scholars involved in researching the body, health, sickness and death in the early modern period; Thirdly, to develop further the historical understanding of the body, and sickness, within the context of early modern social, cultural and religious concerns; Finally, through discussion open up new research questions and develop new approaches, across .a range of disciplines, to the study of the body and its ailments across the sixteenth, seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

Amount: £1,800
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

First European Advanced Seminar in Philosophy of Life Sciences" to be held on 6-10 September 2010 at Hermance 20 Oct 2009

This is the first of a planned series of biennial meetings of senior scholars and research students from six major research centres in the philosophy of the life sciences and medicine across Europe. The aims of this series are: (1) to acquaint young researchers with recent trends in their own and neighbouring disciplines and allow them to network in an early stage of their career; (2) to facilitate exchange of young researchers among the institutions involved and potentially enhance the institutional research scope; and (3) to create a platform for more senior scientists to develop new programs and projects on a European level.

Amount: £4,500
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

The Centre for the Study of Incentives in Health. 19 May 2010

Financial incentive schemes may be more effective than existing approaches in achieving the behaviour change needed for smoking cessation and weight loss. Yet such schemes elicit strong opposition in the media and among the general public, being variously described as unfair , a reward for bad behaviour , and coercive and manipulative . We aim to describewhich characteristics of incentive schemes make them more or less acceptable to the general population, as well as explore the motivations behind judgements of acceptability, such as concern for negative consequences, protected values, judgements of responsibility, and emotions such as disgust or anger. We further aim to disentangle factors which we hypothesize to influence the perception that incentives can sometimes be coercive or manipulative, and to establish the relationship between these judgements and those of acceptability.

Amount: £8,841
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London
Amount: £7,171
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London

Radiofrequency Methods For The Non-Invasive, Non-Destructive Detection And Quantitative Analysis Of Counterfeit, Fake And Substandard Medicines. 19 Mar 2010

Counterfeit, fake and substandard medicines constitute a fast-growing threat to public health, for example, the use of substandard medicines can lead to fatalities, and the emergence of medicineresistant forms of infectious agents. Current estimates are that around 1% of medicines in developed countries, and 10 30% of medicines in developing countries, are counterfeit1. This project aims to develop a robust, economical, user-friendly and portable instrument for the non-invasive, non-destructive, quantitative and highly-specific testing of packaged pharmaceutical products, principally, but not exclusively, cartons, bottles and blister packs that will aim to give the operator an answer in a few seconds to a few minutes depending on the medicine and quantity without the need to open the pack. The instrument will operate using nuclear quadrupole resonance (QR) a radiofrequency (RF) spectroscopic technique that can detect signals through multiple layers of cardboard, glass, plastic and/or wood. QR can analyse any compound containing a quadrupolar nucleus, and, in particular, it is ideally suited for the analysis of compounds containing nitrogen, chlorine or bromine, sodium and potassium, which includes over 80% of all medicines.2 Science 7 This technology-transfer project will take this technology to the advanced demonstrator stage and serve as a springboard to commercializing the approach through licensing the technology to a commercial manufacturer or establishing a spin-out company. The key to the proposed research is that QR signals from the same nucleus have different frequencies, shapes and widths according to, for example, the molecular structure of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), the method used to prepare the API, the crystal size, number of crystal defects, the nature or quantity of impurities present and the age of the material and temperature at which it has been stored; meaning that impure, counterfeit or substandard versions of the same medicine can be distinguished and classified without the need to know what other components are present in the pill formulation.

Amount: £473,485
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London

Biomedical vacation scholarship 14 Jun 2010

Not available

Amount: £2,880
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship 14 Jun 2010

Not available

Amount: £1,520
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Medical Research Council

Biomedical Vacation scholarship 14 Jun 2010

Not available

Amount: £14,820
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London

Value in People Award. 29 Mar 2010

Not available

Amount: £350,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London

An Imaging pipeline for screening mouse embryos. 25 Feb 2009

We have established two innovative approaches for mouse embryo phenotyping. At Oxford, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a high-throughput/low-resolution approach that can quickly identify abnormal tissue or organ morphology using fixed embryos; at NIMR, high resolution episcopic imaging (HREM), a low-throughput/high-resolution approach based on block face imaging of fixed embryos, provides extremely detailed morphology of whole embryos, with resolution approaching that obtained by hist ological analysis. We propose to establish an imaging pipeline that combines MRI and HREM analysis of whole mouse embryos. We will complement the existing Oxford MRI facility with a dedicated HREM facility at NIMR. This pipeline will be used to analyse embryos from ongoing mutagenesis screens in the mouse. The data collected will, for the first time, provide systematic and comprehensive imaging in a form that permits analysis at high resolution by both 2D and 3D methods. Such data will be pro vided to the research community as a resource to investigate any aspect of mouse embryo morphology and for identification of mutant lines in which the organ or tissue of interest is affected. Such a resource will facilitate others to exploit the use of mutagenesis programmes for studies of many aspects of embryo development.

Amount: £384,906
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Medical Research Council