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Results

A multiphoton imaging facility for in vitro and in vivo studies of CNS function and disease 16 Jun 2016

This proposal seeks funding to establish a multiuser, multiphoton biological imaging facility. This will be largely, but not exclusively, used to support neurobiological research at the University Exeter. Although enjoying a considerable degree of biological imaging expertise the university presently has no multiphoton fluorescence facilities. This bid will not only eliminate this shortfall but will provide a truly cutting edge facility for use by a broad range of Exeter’s bioscientific community. The equipment purchased will also enable us to establish a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging facility available to multiple users- which we believe would be the first multiuser facility for this form of non-linear label free imaging in the UK. The system will be housed in the imaging wing of the University of Exeter’s new Living Systems Institute a 7 storey building due to open in 2016 https://www.exeter.ac.uk/livingsystems/building/about/. This facility will contain 2 independent work stations, both fed by the output of single, widely tuneable, dual beam, laser source (e.g. Spectraphysics Insight DS+ or Chameleon Discovery). These represent the state-of-the-art in terms of power output, pulse length and dispersion correction. Importantly they offer tuning across the widest range of near infrared wavelengths (circa 680-1300 nm).

Amount: £584,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

Open access block grant 2016/17 30 Sep 2016

Not available

Amount: £19,452
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

Public Engagement Provision 31 Dec 2015

Despite host shifts being a major source of emerging infectious disease, we have much to learn about why hosts vary in their susceptibilities to novel pathogens and how viruses evolve in new hosts. The first goal of this fellowship is to understand what factors affect the ability of a virus to infect a novel host. I will break the infection process down into different steps to test whether differences in susceptibility are due to the ability of the virus to: bind, enter, replicate in, and exit h ost cells. I will then examine whether the ability of the virus to suppress the host immune response can determine whether it can infect novel hosts. I will investigate the relative importance of environmental versus host-genetic factors in determining the success of host shifts by determining how susceptibility changes with temperature. Next I will use viruses experimentally evolved in different species to examine how viruses adapt to host species, and what consequences this has on their abilit y to infect further hosts. Finally, I will evolve viruses in alternating hosts, using closely or distantly related species, to examine how host breadth affects the potential of a virus to infect a range of novel hosts.

Amount: £31,100
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

Postgraduate Medical Humanities Conference 2016 30 Apr 2016

Following on from the success of preceding Postgraduate Medical Humanities Conferences in 2014 and 2015, this interdisciplinary conference aims to reflect the broad and vibrant research of the medical humanities by bringing together postgraduate researchers from a number of different disciplines from institutions across the UK and abroad. The conference will enable students at all stages of their postgraduate career to exchange ideas and share their work in a welcoming and stimulating environment, providing the opportunity to discuss their research with scholars working from a range of perspectives. Delegates have been invited to submit abstracts for a twenty-minute paper or sixty-minute workshop on any subject relating to health, illness, sex, and medicine. Panels will be supplemented by two keynote speeches, a roundtable discussion about engagement and impact, and a related performance that will be open to both delegates and the wider community. There will be a conference meal on the first evening of the conference, and a networking event on the second evening of the conference. We hope that the conference will promote interdisciplinary approaches and collaboration. We also hope to provoke lively debate about the intersection of medical practice and medical humanities.

Amount: £3,100
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

Open access award 2015/16. 21 Sep 2015

Not available

Amount: £36,560
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

Monogenic diabetes in Iran. 01 May 2015

The aim of this seed project is to establish a collaboration with hospital-based researchers in Iran to understand monogenic diabetes in this Middle Eastern country. This study is important: (i) The prevalence of diabetes and obesity is high in Iran; family history and clinical criteria used in Europe may not be useful in diagnosis. Correct diagnosis is important because monogenic forms can often be treated with oral agents rather than insulin. (ii) The rate of consanguinity is high; identificat ion of new recessive mutations/genes is easier in consanguineous families, which will inform us about the underlying mechanism and diagnostic tests for monogenic diabetes. (iii) This will be the first study of the genetics of monogenic diabetes in Iran using next generation sequencing and whole-exome sequencing. I work with one of the leading groups in monogenic diabetes (led by Professors Hattersley and Ellard). I aim to (i) Establish a collaboration with Iranian clinicians and set up cohorts of monogenic diabetes. (ii) Use advances in DNA sequencing to assess the role of known and novel genes in the pathogenesis of monogenic diabetes. (iii) Use known genetic variants and non-genetic biomarkers to help classify young patients into type 1 diabetes or likely monogenic diabetes.

Amount: £93,819
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

Open access publishing costs 2014/15. 15 Sep 2014

Not available

Amount: £36,560
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

Death by Rubber Duck - a community project to determine the effects of removing BPA from the diet of schoolchildren. 08 Jul 2014

Young people will be given the opportunity to lead an empirical research project whilst being mentored in aspects of scientific research from project planning to public engagement; a unique form of citizen science which will pilot the possibilities afforded by this novel approach to conducting publicly-engaged research. The project is focused on assessment of the biological effects of reducing the levels of a plastics additive (Bisphenol A; BPA) a chemical commonly found in food and drinks packa ging, by consumption of fresh or unpackaged foods. Epidemiological studies have shown that chemicals such as BPA present in the food we eat can impact our health. Work from collaborators has indicated that levels of several common chemicals associated with food packaging can be reduced by up to 70% in just one week by simple dietary interventions. Here, we will work with approximately 120 A/AS level students who, as scientists and participants, will attend a series of workshops to design an inte rvention study and learn about environmental factors that may influence human health. They will undertake the dietary intervention, designed to reduce BPA levels, assess the outcomes (urinary BPA levels and expression level of BPA-responsive genes), analyse the results, contribute to a publication as a consortium and devise and deliver a programme of community engagement for examples through, talks, social media and exhibitions. The project has the potential to make a significant contribution to the scientific literature as well as facilitating public discussions about BPA, health and wider issues of conducting scientific research.

Amount: £30,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

Birth, Marriage and Sex in Eighteenth Century Wales. 13 May 2014

My proposed research will examine the social, cultural and medical history of childbirth in eighteenth-century Wales. My focus will be on the experience of reproduction and childbirth for unmarried mothers and on perinatal mortality, which I believe can be linked to a diverse typology of illegitimacies that carried varying levels of acceptability which influenced perinatal survival rates. My key goals will include investigation of the following: - What forms of courtship, cohabitation and p re-marital conjugal union were acceptable within communities? - Did rates of infant mortality vary for illegitimate births resulting from both acceptable and unacceptable sexual unions? - What childbirth customs and practices existed in eighteenth-century Wales and were they different for unmarried parturient women? - To what extent were there regional variations between in childbirth customs and practices, and in the role of midwives in England and Wales? - Did the largely rural nature of Welsh settlements affect accessibility to the services of a midwife and did this affect mortality rates? - What impact did medical advances in childbirth in the eighteenth century have on Wales?

Amount: £84,588
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

Using genetics to understand how the maternal intrauterine environment influences fetal growth. 04 Jun 2014

The primary aim of this project is to use analyses of genetic data in the largest and best-characterised studies of mothers and offspring to understand which factors in the maternal intrauterine environment are causally associated with birth weight. I will construct and validate genetic risk scores for maternal traits (including fasting glucose, BMI, vitamin D levels) and test these for association with offspring birth weight in a meta-analysis of 245,000 individuals from the UK Biobank and E arly Growth Genetics (EGG) Consortium (including N=37,000 accurately phenotyped individuals and N=25,220 maternal-fetal pairs to control for confounding by fetal genotype). Strong evidence of association between a genetic risk score for a maternal trait and birth weight will indicate a causal association. Further analyses of associations between genetic risk scores and cord-blood insulin levels, neonatal adiposity and postnatal growth will enable us to begin to characterise the mechanisms linkin g causal maternal factors to fetal growth. The identification of causal associations will provide extremely important information linking modifiable maternal factors with offspring birth weight and thereby informing decisions on pregnancy management for healthy fetal growth.

Amount: £849,529
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

University of Exeter Medical Humanities Postgraduate Conference. 27 May 2014

The Centre for Medical History at the University of Exeter will be holding a two day interdisciplinary medical humanities conference for postgraduate students on the 24th and 25th July 2014. The conference will bring together the highest quality postgraduate research in all fields of the medical humanities and encourage cross-disciplinary discussion. In addition to papers from forty delegates the event will also include two keynote addresses, a panel discussion with keynotes and department membe rs, and a presentation from Wellcome Trust representatives about humanities funding opportunities.

Amount: £1,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship 23 Jun 2014

Not available

Amount: £4,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

Open access award 2013/14. 16 Sep 2013

Not available

Amount: £60,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship 24 Jun 2013

Not available

Amount: £4,320
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

The Medical World of Early Modern England, Wales and Ireland, c. 1500-1715. 31 Jan 2012

This project will develop and make public a groundbreaking database with biographies of all medical practitioners active in England, Wales and Ireland c.1500-1715, which will then be used to produce the first all-round study of the nature and impact of medical practice in early modern Britain, to be published as a major monograph by a leading university press. The database will build on a prototype already created by Dr Peter Elmer, a senior researcher on the project (which already includes much of the necessary coverage for England, and some material for Wales and Ireland), to which will be added information from existing databases of other scholars, notably Dr Margaret Pelling, and from family and local history groups. Research assistants with expertise in Welsh and Irish sources/languages will be employed to ensure full coverage of those countries. The database (hosted initially by the Centre for Medical History (CMH) at Exeter) will be developed as a permanent online resource, link ed to other existing online resources, with the facility for others to add to the database under controlled arrangements. The project researchers, together with other CMH staff (directed by Professor Barry), will analyse the data on medical practitioners to produce the first comprehensive analysis of early modern British medical practitioners. This will explore not only their education, career patterns and medical activities, but also their major contribution to science, the arts, business, reli gious and political thought, revealing the key contribution of medical practitioners to the revolutionary changes in Britains place in the world.

Amount: £923,122
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

Open access award 2012/13. 17 Sep 2012

Not available

Amount: £50,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

The University of Exeter iGEM project 27 Feb 2012

Not available

Amount: £16,200
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

Master's Studentship 12 Jul 2011

Not available

Amount: £19,105
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship 25 Jun 2012

Not available

Amount: £2,520
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter