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Recipients:
Volunteering Matters
University of Leeds
Currency:
GBP
Amounts:
£1,000 - £5,000

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Recipient Organizations (clear)
The Royal British Legion (144) Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust (130) Merched Y Wawr (114) The Guide Association (87) University of Cambridge (72) The Scout Association (70) Cruse Bereavement Care (54) University College London (53) University of Oxford (48) The National Childbirth Trust (42) University of Edinburgh (42) University of Exeter (39) University of Warwick (35) University of Glasgow (34) Queen Mary University of London (32) University of Liverpool (31) Woodcraft Folk (31) King's College London (30) University of Manchester (30) Newcastle University (28) The Burma Star Association (27) University of Birmingham (27) University College Dublin (25) University of Bristol (25) University of Nottingham (25) University of Southampton (25) Imperial College London (23) Multiple Sclerosis Society (23) Special Olympics Great Britain (23) University of Aberdeen (23) University of Leeds (23) Volunteer Reading Help (22) The Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and Families Association - Forces Help (21) University of Kent (20) Parkinson's Disease Society of the United Kingdom (19) University of Leicester (19) University of York (19) Alzheimer's Society (18) Birkbeck University of London (18) British Epilepsy Association (18) London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (18) Oxford Brookes University (18) Queen's University Belfast (18) AGE UK (17) Arthritis Care (17) Education Services - Headquarters (17) Keele University (17) Sue Ryder (17) University of Sheffield (17) Workers' Educational Association (17) See Less

Results

Provision for Public Engagement 31 Dec 2015

We will exploit our discovery of fundamental mechanisms regulating assembly in important single-stranded RNA viruses based on multiple, dispersed RNA-protein interactions (packaging signals, PSs) to: 1. Determine how genomic RNAs play regulatory roles in the mechanisms of virus assembly, maturation and host cell invasion. 2. Determine which viral and host components are needed to develop a quantitative systems understanding of assembly in vivo. 3. Analyse how viruses may evade anti-viral strategies targeting PS functions, triggering the occurrence of mutant strains. This paves the way for novel forms of anti-viral intervention.

Amount: £4,937
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds

The Compassionate Imagination: Things that bring emotional intelligence to life 30 Jun 2016

This grant will fund inaugural workshops for six core members of the Compassionate Imagination network. The network builds upon established professional connections, including collaborations with theatre makers. Progressing current thinking about critical medical humanities (Viney, Callard, and Woods, 2015) it addresses an Arts and Health remit, working in conjunction with the Compassionate Mind Foundation’s leading practitioners of compassion-based approaches to education. The network’s pilot activities will involve school students as participant-researchers in a project to bring emotional intelligence (Mayer and Salovey, 1990; Goleman, 1995) to life, using material objects to invoke the flow of compassion. The inaugural network workshops, scheduled for 23rd-24th June 2016, centre upon knowledge exchange towards honing a Wellcome Seed Award application (deadline: 5 August 2016). Our discussions will address three key questions: How are compassion and imagination related in: a) contemporary clinical psychology, b) contemporary performance and live art, c) recent findings from the archaeology of human origins. From these perspectives, what is understood about material engagement (of humans with objects) and its relation to compassion? Inspired and informed by knowledge exchange amongst the core network, what research and development strategies are best suited to experiential learning in this field?

Amount: £4,779
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds

Investiagtion of protein-lipid interactions 01 Apr 2016

Until recently the lipid membrane was thought to be a passive or neutral environment in which the transmembrane proteins are located, but this has now been supplanted by a model in which lipid-protein interactions are important to the functioning of the cell. Proteins can locally deform membranes, modify and reorganise lipids, and regulate membrane charge, diffusion and lateral organisation. One method for investigating protein-lipid interaction is to measure the effect of proteins on the elusive "lipid rafts", which are hypothesised to exist in membranes possessing two co-existing liquid phases, as micro-domains of liquid ordered (Lo) phase in a sea of liquid disordered (Ld) phase. However, our recent work using a Wellcome Trust funded high speed Atomic Force Microscopy indicates that a more subtle mechanism fully explains the known properties of lipid rafts in cell membranes; that rafts are actually a highly dynamic fluctuation of a single liquid phase near a critical point of the lipid bilayer phase diagram, and that this fluctuation is then stabilised by the presence of a transmembrane protein, creating a stable nano-scale raft of

Amount: £2,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds

Exploring DNA origami nanotiles using atomic force microscopy as potential therapeutic delivery vehicles 01 Apr 2016

Production of DNA origami nanostructures is a promising approach for creating biocompatible nanomaterials to be used as drug delivery vehicles. The size and shape of these DNA nanostructures can be controlled by rationale design of the sequence of the DNA staple strands relative to the long template strand. We use atomic force microscopy (AFM) of two-dimensional nanotiles to investigate their self-assembly and final structure. Typically, nanotiles are not completely flat due to the helical nature of the DNA, which introduces supercoiling distributed across the nanotile. Certain drugs bind naturally to the DNA double helix, often either in the minor groove or as intercalators, inserting in between the base-pairs. The binding of drugs will affect the helical pitch of the DNA and change the curvature of the nanotiles. We can assess the curvature of the nanotiles by seeing which way up they bind to a model mica surface using the AFM. This project will investigate how binding of drugs into the DNA helix affects the DNA origami structure and shape. This is critical knowledge for rational design of nanotiles as drug delivery vehicles. Recent published studies show that nanotiles readily cross the cell membrane and are ideal candidates as therapeutic carriers.

Amount: £2,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds

Accelerating motor learning using robotic devices 01 Apr 2016

Motor learning can be conceptualised as an iterative process where a parameter-space (an internal representation of a task) is built from a collection of inverse models via trial-and-error learning. This raises the question of whether parameter-space manipulations (e.g. those that artificially increase the amount of motor noise) can accelerate the creation of robust inverse models. In this experiment, we will test whether error augmentation via working point force fields can optimise this learning process. To this end, we will run a multi-session experiment where participants will control a robotic end-effector and follow a target moving in 2D space within a visuohaptic environment. Following baseline measurement of motor ability, we will compare the learning rate on this task after three 45 minute training sessions with: (i) haptic guidance (error minimization); (ii) haptic disruption (error augmentation) and (iii) no haptic guidance or disruption (control).

Amount: £2,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds

Manual Control During Exercise: Implications for Strategies to Increase Physical Activity in the Workplace 01 Apr 2016

Emerging evidence supports the feasibility of raising daily energy expenditure (EE) by replacing office work-related sedentary behaviour with low-intensity non-exercise physical activity (PA) via workstation alternatives such as under desk cycles. Using an under desk cycle while interacting with a computer requires the user to divide their attentional resources between the two tasks. Given this, it surprising that little research has examined whether under desk cycles compromises productivity. In this study, we examine the impact of using an under desk cycle on 3 upper limb motor tasks over a number of practice trials. Participants will cycle at 20 watts while completing (1) a tracking task (2) an aiming task (3) a tracing task repeating this 6 times over a 14 days period. We will sample and analyse 2D kinematics of the cursor while completing these tasks and Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE), movement time and path accuracy, respectively, will be used to quantify the effect that cycling has on manual control. Furthermore, this sudy will investigate if and how continued use and practice of the desk cycle affects these measures as week to understand if and how people adapt their control of manual tasks over a period of time.

Amount: £2,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds

Development of a microfluidic device to study single cells in controllable microenvironments 01 Apr 2016

The project is coming together of two exciting areas of sciences, which we think will make a significant contribution to our understanding for the nature of basic unit of life, the cells. The first aspect is the use of microfluidic technology as a quantitative and reproducible method for monitoring individual cells. The second aspect is the research of Embryonic Stem (ES) cells representing an excellent system to study the interaction between intrinsic and extrinsic factors in cell fate decisions. The primary goal of this research is the development of a microfluidic methodology that enables study of the gene expression occurring in a single cell, and controlling the microenvironments enclosing cells. The microfluidic technology will open the possibility of exploring problems in eukaryotic cells as much of our ability to harness the potential of ES cells will depend on our ability to control interactions between the cell and the signals that determine its behaviour.

Amount: £2,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds

Design and synthesis of Inhibitors of PfDHODH: Towards a new treatment for malaria 01 Apr 2016

An estimated 3.3 billion people are at risk of malaria, with populations living in sub-Saharan Africa having the highest infection rates, resulting in ~219 million documented cases of malaria and in excess of 660,000 deaths in 2010. The treatment and control of malaria is increasingly difficult due to the spread of resistance to antimalarial drugs. This is a concern even for artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs)- the first-line of treatment, where there is evidence of altered parasite sensitivity in a number of countries. In order to eradicate malaria it is clear we will need new classes of antimalarial with novel mechanisms of action and defined pharmacological profile. It is reassuring that several potential drugs are entering clinical trials but their success or longevity is unknown, necessitating development of new inhibitors operating on novel targets. Work at Leeds and elsewhere has identified the enzyme DHODH as an attractive target for the development of new antimalarial drugs. This project will apply structure-based drug design and synthesis to produce drug-like DHODH inhibitors as potential new antimalarial drug leads, which will then be evaluated biologically.

Amount: £2,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds

Chemical inhibitors of Orai as possible therapeutics for treating colorectal cancer and associated liver metastases 01 Apr 2016

New drugs to treat colorectal and associated cancers are urgently required as Incidence of colorectal cancer alone is 75 thousand per year in the UK and there are no universally effective medications currently available. The project seeks to identify and develop new inhibitors of a protein (Orai3) as potential therapeutics for the treatment of these cancers and to support validation of these proteins as rational targets for future drug discovery. No chemical inhibitors of Orai3 have been discovered to date, however the group have recently identified a series of inhibitors of the homologue Orai1 with off-target activity at Orai3 which they hope to repurpose for Orai3 inhibition. The aim of the project is to develop a Structure and activity (SAR) for the inhibition of Orai3 channels thus allowing the control and inhibition of the Orai3 channel in cancerous cells. Chemical inhibitors identified within this project may offer potential starting points for development of commercially viable medicines and as tools to support the basic understanding of Orai related cancers leading to further research.

Amount: £2,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds

Public Engagement Provision. 25 Nov 2014

Not available

Amount: £4,973
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds

''Post-AIDS' and global health discourses: Interdisciplinary Perspectives'. 27 Oct 2014

Ideas of a 'post-AIDS' future have gained momentum in the global north despite the continuing effects of HIV/AIDS in the global south in particular. While assessing the ways in which 'post-AIDS' is being interpreted across a range of disciplinary and global contexts, this symposium prioritises how the cultural, historical and ethical insights from Medical Humanities work can transform approaches to 'post-AIDS' and the global health discourses circulated by, amongst others, the Joint United Natio ns Program on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) and the World Health Organisation. Throughout, we foreground interdisciplinary themes drawn from Medical Humanities, such as the role of language choice and biomedical terminology in global health discourses. Though a significant body of research on HIV/AIDS and global health exists, there has been little sustained attention to interdisciplinary perspectives by scholars, policy makers, and global health organisations despite how these discussions complement a rang e of disciplinary approaches, policy initiatives and treatment and prevention programmes. Alongside these perspectives, we engage with the current global health moment by addressing the 2015 benchmark year for the United Nations 2000 Health Development goal which aims to 'combat HIV/AIDS, Malaria and other diseases'. Overall, we consider how and why 'post-AIDS' reflects a distinct shift in global health.

Amount: £2,965
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds

An Exploratory Pilot Study to Map the working practices and experiences of Internet based Sex Workers in the UK. 14 Jul 2014

This small research project will act as an exploratory pilot study to investigate the experiences and working practices of sex workers who operate through the Internet. We have little knowledge of their experiences of sex working, how it differs from working in a brothel or on the street, and moreso how they experience crimes, particularly violence. We will conduct a survey, hosted through Bristol Online Surveys, to the individual membership of the National Ugly Mugs, who have signed up to recei ve information about health, safety and wellbeing issues as sex workers. The pilot study will aim to capture some core demographic information, as well as map types of sex work, and ask about issues such as stigma, isolation, safety, contact with health services and crimes experienced. The survey will be analysed to expose core data about this population from which a larger mixed methods study can be designed. We will present a written report, a briefing for specialist sex work health projects, and hold a Learning Event symposium where practitioners are brought together who work directly with sex workers, as well as national policing representatives who work with the NUM scheme.

Amount: £4,234
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds

The Endless Possibilities of Rejuvenation: Hormones, Electricity and Cosmetics, c.1870-2000. 14 Apr 2014

This grant will enable initial archival scoping, mapping out the content and nature of primary historical sources relating to the history of rejuvenation treatments and therapies from the late-nineteenth century onwards. The project will focus on three key episodes in the history of rejuvenation: the use of chemical hormone treatments, the advent of domestic electrotherapy for physiological rejuvenation, and the relationship between trends in cosmetics and anti-ageing. The emphasis of the projec t will be on establishing how rejuvenation treatments were devised, manufactured, marketed and, most importantly, used. Two key historiographical themes - the gendered nature of the ageing process, and the domestication of everyday medical technologies - will underpin the three case studies of hormones, electrotherapy and cosmetics. There is much archival material held at the Wellcome Library and the Boots Archive relating to these themes, and this grant will support a thorough survey of these s ources. This research will lay the groundwork for further funding applications designed to fully realise the project in the form of a monograph, although this grant will of itself lead to a research article addressing one of the key questions as outlined in this application.

Amount: £1,745
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds

Vacation Scholarships 2017 - University of Leeds 16 Jun 2017

Vacation Scholarships 2017 - University of Leeds

Amount: £4,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds

"Working through psychoanalysis: Freud's legacy in art, cinema, literature and popular culture" to be held at the University of Leeds on 15-17th April 2011 21 Feb 2011

As a part of the University of Leeds' ongoing 'Medicine and the Everyday' project, this conference aims to bring together clinicians, creative practitioners, and scholars from various disciplines to explore the cultural legacy of one of the most significant and widely contested developments in the history of modern medicine: Freud's invention of psychoanalysis. Our concern is not primarily with the therapeutic validity of psychoanalysis today, nor with the application of psychoanalytic theory to the cultural world. Our goal is to facilitate a discussion between academics, psychotherapists and artists on the ways in which Freud's specifically clinical invention has impacted the cultural world at large. As such, the conference will be dedicated to examining how the psychoanalytic discovery has altered our very frames of cultural reference and creative possibility, and to interrogating the myriad interpretations, disseminations and (mis)representations of psychoanalysis attempted within the cultural sphere during the last century - from major aesthetic movements to popular culture. 'Working Through Psychoanalysis' will thus create the conditions for a truly multidisciplinary exchange between academic, creative and clinical perspectives on the cultural transformations effected by the so-called 'Freudian revolution'.

Amount: £2,930
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds
Amount: £3,950
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds

"Transforming bodies: New directions in medical humanities and cultural disability" to be held at Liverpool, Birmingham and Leeds from November 2010-May 2011 14 Jun 2010

Under the emerging banner of Cultural Disability Studies and with the specific focus of the 'transforming body', the proposed seminars seek to establish a dialogue between scholars working in the Arts and Humanities (especially on issues of representation, cultural history and ethics) and Health Sciences, medical praCtitioners, and those involved in disability advocacy and community work. Narrative- and representation-based methodologies are central to humanities-based Disability Studies as well as being at the forefront of recent innovative scholarship in the Medical Humanities. These seminars will seek to develop productive conversations between these perspectives, engaging with a range of academic disciplines as well as medical and health practice. The series focuses on three pivotal disability issues: prosthesis, prenatal screening, and ageing. Around each of these, priorities in medical advancement, healthcare and technological innovation combine with concerns about personhood, lived experience, ethics and activism. The objective is to move towards a genuinely multiand trans-disciplinary approach to theorising disability and culture, and to locate cultural disability scholarship within methods and arguments stemming from practice-based approaches. Equally, the seminars will suggest the value of engaging with issues of representation, narrative and reception to offer new perspectives on clinical, medical and community encounters with disability.

Amount: £4,054
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds

Philosophy in Research Ethics. 15 Feb 2010

Philosophy in Research Ethics will initiate a structured discussion of distinctively philosophical issues around research ethics and ethics review. There is currently no group regularly working on these issues. The conference is intended to be the first of a regular series of events and so the essential first step in consolidating the theoretical basis in which research ethics is considered and ethics committees work. It will establish an initial network of academics with philosophical interest in research ethics and research ethics committees, focus attention on the issues of principle that risk getting lost amongst the practical considerations which are the stock in trade of many ethics committees, and provide a forum for the investigation of those issues. The conference will focus on specifically philosophical work in relation to ethics, ethics review and ethics committees. As the first in a series, it will start to develop a map of the theoretical terrain: the questions that need to be asked, the strategies available for answering them, and the constraints which apply to those answers. Just as importantly, it will enable the dissemination of work that is already underway in this area.

Amount: £1,215
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds

'Angels and Adventuresses: Images and Experiences of First World War Nurses' to be held at the Wellcome Trust Conference Centre 9-10th September 2010 20 Oct 2009

The workshop aims to bring together 13 world-class academics in the fields of history and literary studies. Each has already published scholarly work in the area of First World War nursing, and has a recognized reputation for work in this field. Working within different disciplines, however, these researchers have rarely (if at all) had opportunities to interact, debate and discuss their approaches collectively. The workshop will be an invaluable opportunity for participants to develop a new piece of work for publication, while productively engaging with approaches to the sources gleaned from different disciplines (history, history of medicine, gender studies, literary studies). It will extend across two days, and will give each participant the opportunity to present his or her sources and initial findings and then engage in discussion and debate with colleagues. The intended output from the event is an edited book with the working title: 'Angels and Adventuresses: Images and Experiences of First World War Nurses'. The objectives of the project are therefore: to hold a two-day workshop of world-class scholars in the field of First World War nursing; to develop a series of interlinked papers, which will collectively form a comparative, interdisciplinary and scholarly publication; to use the workshop as a forum for exchange and debate, thereby shaping these individual pieces in order to give them coherence as parts of a larger work; to produce an edited text for publication by a major academic publisher.

Amount: £4,991
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds
Amount: £3,120
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leeds