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Recipients:
University of Cambridge
Currency:
GBP
Amounts:
£1,000 - £5,000

Results

'Medicine and science in the multinational empires of Central and Eastern Europe, ca. 1800-1918' workshop to be held at the University of Cambridge on 23rd June 2006. 22 May 2006

Conference: Historians examining the interaction between Western science and medicine and imperialism have shown how Western powers employed science and medicine to reinforce their rule and propagate their culture in the countries they colonized in the quest for cheap raw materials and new markets. They have, furthermore, highlighted how the new economic and social organization in the colonies affected the health of populations and how, simultaneously, Western medicine itself was profoundly reshaped by encounters with new cultures, diseases and medical practices. These studies have opened important questions that underpin the current debates about science and medicine in the post-colonial and post-Cold war world. Yet they are exclusively based on non-European colonies of Western powers, in particular Britain, and consequently failed to offer explanatory frameworks for the role of science and medicine in the expansion and maintenance of two geographically contiguous empires of Central and Eastern Europe: the Habsburg Empire and Russia. Little historical attention has been given to the ways in which the multiethnic and multicultural environments of these empires shaped medical and scientific practices. Yet the historical legacy of these empires continues to influence medicine and science in successor countries in the region. The workshop will cover the following topics: The relationship between national politics and competing views on medical education, research and practice The impact of the multilingual environment on the clinical treatment and research practices The role of sciences of race in the maintenance and expansion of the two empires The question of the dominant language of science and its role in the building of intellectual networks in the region Through the example of architectural solutions for medical institutions and their regional variations, it will reassess the centre/periphery model.

Amount: £1,305
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

'Secrets and Knowledge: Medicine, Science and Commerce, 1500-1800' symposium to be held at Cambridge University on 15-16 February 2008. 17 Oct 2007

Secrets played a central role in transformations in medical and scientific knowledge in early modern Europe. As a new fascination with novelty began to take hold from the lat fifteenth century, Europeans thirsted for previously unknown details about the natural world: new plants, animals, and other objects from nature, new recipies for medical and alchemical procedures, new knowledge about the human body, and new facts about the way nature worked. These 'secrets' became popular items of commerce and trade, as the quest for new and exclusive bits of natural knowledge met the vibrant early modern marketplace. Whether disclosed widely in print or kept more circumspect in manuscripts, secrets helped drive an expanding interest in nature throughout early modern Europe. The conference will provide a much-needed forum to explore recent research on the circulation of secrets in medieval and early modern medicine and science. As the first conference in over two decades to focus exclusively on this crucial genre, it will assess the advances and transformations in our understanding of secrets' role in the development of natural knowledge across early modern Europe.

Amount: £3,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

The 2nd Annual Postgraduate Bioethics Conference: 'Why bioethics? Our research in context'. 30 Jan 2007

The 2nd Annual Postgraduate Bioethics Conference: 'Why Bioethics? Our research in context' This meeting follows last year's inaugural postgraduate bioethics conference, 'Bioethics: Past, Present and Future', held at the University of Birmingham and funded by the Wellcome Trust. This meeting will bring together participants who will inevitably have strengths in quite different disciplines, and will thus provide the opportunity for people to mutually inform each other of their areas of expertise. The meeting has been carefully structured so that the focus is on interaction and discussion between all participants, both during the conference itself, and in the social events outside of it. Keynote speakers will open and close the conference, giving presentations focused on the meeting's key theme, and providing time for discussion. The content of the conference will be broad, and structured according to the interests of those participating. Presentation sessions will be tailored to these interests, with each session being preceded by a plenary paper designed to stimulate discussion about the ways that the foundations and implications of bioethical research might be thought about. We consider this broad scope to be a significant strength of the conference. By situating personal projects within a wide-range of different areas of interest, and the methodological and theoretical assumptions that underpin such areas, an interdisciplinary overview of a rapidly developing field will help to widen the narrow focus of doctoral and masters research projects. Equally, this approach will provide young researchers with a breadth of thinking that is vital for a successful academic career in this field. Building on last year's initiative, we plan again to run an essay competition designed to raise awareness of bioethics in schools. If bioethics is to gain a footing as a discipline in its own right, raising awareness of the issues it incorporates at this level of the educational system is essential.

Amount: £4,555
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

"A programme of events by Mary Fissell in Cambridge" to be held in Cambridge form January to July 2011 13 Jul 2010

We seek support to bring Professor Mary Fissell to Cambridge to strengthen and enhance our programme on 'Generation to Reproduction', the core activities of which are supported by a Strategic Award (2009-14).

Amount: £3,900
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

British Society for the History of Science Postgraduate Conference 2010 to be held on 5-7th January 2010 30 Nov 2009

Network building, development of presentation skills and exchange of feedback are the central objectives of this meeting, to be supported by sessions encouraging early career scholars to consider their professional options. This meeting provides a supportive environment in which postgraduate students in the history of science, technology and medicine can convene. Delegates can practise their presentation skills outside their home institution, gain conference experience and meet peers from across the world. This not only creates a forum for feedback on work in progress, but also allows graduate students to develop their own professional network. Two skills sessions allow delegates to consult senior academics on questions relating to career development. These sessions focus on academic publishing and the museums sector, and will encourage participation from all delegates, including those not presenting a formal paper. A third postdoc-led session raises awareness of the outreach and education activities headed by the BSHS. These sessions encourage delegates to consider and investigate a range of career options. While the focus of the meeting is on encouraging interaction between graduate-level scholars, these three sessions and a.drinks reception will provide opportunity to discuss experiences with more experienced academics who may be able to offer advice.

Amount: £2,550
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

Supplementary funding 29 Mar 2010

A major objective for CIMR over the next 5 years is to better understand protein localisation, function and metabolism in a range of diseases in which genetic studies have identified the causative genes. Underpinning our core facilities is essential to achieve this objective and will provide added value to the considerable investment that the Wellcome Trust is already making to our scientific activities. Our present scientific goals are: (i) determination of the molecular mechanisms of intracellular protein aggregate formation and breakdown in health and disease, including the identification of novel therapeutic targets for protein conformational diseases; (ii) identifying and characterising the molecular machinery of intracellular membrane traffic and determining how traffic pathways are coordinated, regulated and modified in health and disease; (iii) the identification of genes, proteins and pathways increasing susceptibility to, or protection from, autoimmune diseases; (iv) determining the transcriptional regulation of haematopoietic stem cells. Our proposal includes funding of core specialist scientific staff, annual research retreats, funds to encourage young clinicians back into research and a case for 2 PhD students per annum. We aim to make CIMR a flagship in the UK for interdisciplinary research at the interface between clinical and basic research.

Amount: £4,975
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

British and German Eugenicists in Transnational Context, 1930-50 13 Apr 2010

This project strives to provide a new contextualisation of the interwar eugenics movement with special emphasis placed on the impact of hereditarian thought on international policy-making discussions and processes. This analysis will be concentrated on the three most active national eugenics movements prior to the Second World War: that of the United States, Great Britain, and Germany. It was researchers in these nations that developed most of the underpinnings of eugenics and the formal structures responsible for its influence on state policy. Despite the largely uniform early strength of eugenics in these countries, by 1939 they had reached differing policy achievements. American state governments were the first legislative bodies to implement eugenic laws including sterilisation of the mentally defective. In Germany the newly unified state considered a sterilisation act during the Weimar Republic but this was rejected due to the Catholic opposition. It was only after the rise of Hitler's government that eugenics found fertile ground for its policies. While the example of the United States seems to indicate that a combination of wealthy backers and grass-roots support for eugenics was most critical to its success at the local level and the German example appears to confirm the intuition that nondemocratic governments could most easily implement eugenic policies, the British case provides an interesting counterexample. Despite the fact that Francis Galton and many of the field's most significant early researchers were British there was little pressure to implement eugenic ideas in practice. The campaign for sterilisation in the early 1930s failed to attract powerful supporters and failed quietly, effectively marking the end of attempts to pass eugenic policies prior to the War. This project aims to seek new explanations for the successes and failures of eugenics in policy-making circles by examining these in international contexts. For instance, there is evidence that the British campaign for sterilisation had been launched largely because of pressure from German and American delegates at international congresses who sought to push British representatives from leadership positions by demonstrating their comparative impotence in lobbying for domestic policies these nations had already passed. Similarly, after the promulgation of the 1933 German sterilisation law American eugenicists feared that their continental colleagues were rapidly pushing their governments toward eugenic policies that might threaten American power. The result was a short-term idolisation of Nazism in American eugenic circles. Thus, this research will provide a network analysis of the international connections and indeed rivalries that affected the production of eugenic laws in the countries under consideration. This aspect has never been considered by scholars and will enhance the understanding of how and why eugenics was able to have such a significant impact in some countries while remaining excluded from the corridors of power in others.

Amount: £1,917
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

Archival Research on the Visual History of the Third Plague Pandemic in San Francisco, California and Honolulu, Hawaii. 29 Aug 2014

With this application I am seeking funding to conduct a research trip to various archives in San Francisco and Honolulu. The overall purpose of the trip is to gather visual material on Bubonic Plague outbreaks that hit the cities in 1899 and 1900. Research will be conducted as part of an ongoing project on the Visual Representation of the Third Plague Pandemic, based at CRASSH, University of Cambridge, funded by the European Research Council and led by Dr. Christos Lynteris. This application wil l support the particular analysis of the pandemic's arrival in the USA. In Honolulu and San Francisco, the onset of the plague was met with drastic measures against the Chinese populations of both cities, both refueling the long-standing animosity towards th Chinese immigrants while inventing and establishing cornerstones of the US public health. Photographs, maps and illustrations did not simply record the enfolding events but structured the way of percieving threat as much as anti-plague measu res were constituted through visual framings. A comprehensive survey of the available sources and their inclusion into the project's global open access database will lay ground for further research and will allow for new perspectives on epidemics of the past and present.

Amount: £1,872
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

The characterisation of T7 polymerase amplifier devices and arsenic repressor/promoter combinations in B. subtilis for use in the development of an Arsenic Biosensor. 01 Apr 2016

Harnessing the natural arsenic sensing ability of the bacteria Bacillus subtilis, it has been possible to engineer strains that synthesise a visible pink chromoprotein at different threshold concentrations of arsenic (10, 50 and 200 ppb), corresponding to WHO and government-recommended guidelines for arsenic levels. The constructed strains now require extensive characterisation of individual components of the system. This project aims to characterise the signal-amplifying devices for T7 polymerase and split T7 polymerase, along with several arsenic repressor-promoter combinations. This will be achieved by transferring the desired devices into a pre-designed dual reporter strain of B. subtilis by PCR/molecular cloning/chromosomal integration. The production of fluorescent reporters in plate reader assays for different arsenic concentrations, will allow characterisation of the device output. The performance of these parts and devices across a range of arsenic concentrations and incubation regimes (temperatures, fluctuating temperatures etc.) will also be addressed. The development of an Arsenic Biosensor would effectively address the global issue of arsenic contamination of ground water in a low cost, accessible and sensitive manor.

Amount: £2,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

Evaluation of feasibility of assessing liver function during ex situ liver perfusion using microdialysis 01 Apr 2016

Each year 15% of patients on the UK liver transplant waiting list die awaiting a donor liver, while a significant proportion of livers go unused because clinicians are unsure that the liver would provide life sustaining function. We are now able to perfuse a liver ex situ with oxygenated blood while evaluating markers of damage and function, enabling better assessment of organ viability. Microdialysis is a method in routine use in neurosurgery to evaluate brain metabolism following trauma, and involves passing a fine dialysis catheter into the brain parenchyma and perfusing it with an isotonic perfusate and examining the dialysate for metabolic markers such as glucose, lactate, and pyruvate. It can also be used to interrogate metabolism by introducing labeled substrates. Microdialysis has been used to study liver transplants post transplant, but has not been used to evaluate function ex situ where its relatively rapid readout may facilitate early and accurate decision making.This project will examine the feasibility of using microdialysis in perfused livers. Human livers that have been declined for transplantation will be studied and the optimal technique developed. Microdialysis results will be correlated with perfusate chemistry (lactate fall, maintenance of pH, ALT, AST) and metabolomic profile.

Amount: £2,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

Amani Research Station - the post-colonial period. A witness seminar. 30 Aug 2013

Support is sought to hold a half-day witness seminar to be held in Cambridge on August 5th 2013 on the period of Africanisation (late 1950s to 1970) at the Amani research station in Tanzania - then the main malaria research site in formerly British Africa. The seminar will involve at least 10 expatriate scientists and technicians, women as well as men, who worked and lived in Amani from the late 1950s to the early 1970s, and who handed over their tasks to East African colleagues. The s eminar will be recorded and transcribed and annotated bythe applicants. (This witness seminar application will be followed by an independent application by Drs Mangesho and Okwaro for a twin event to be held at Amani research station, bringing together the East African scientists and technicians who worked on the site at the time.)

Amount: £4,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

Classifying Sexuality and Subjectivity in the DSM-5. 19 Nov 2012

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders is the standard reference for the classification of mental disorders, and is seen as authoritative by clinicians, academics, drug companies and policy makers alike around the world. As the first major revision since 1994, the publication of the upcoming 5th edition of the DSM in May 2013 will represent a significant social and medical event. Psychiatric discourses have increasingly struggled with their embeddedness in culture since the pa rtial declassification of homosexuality from the DSM in the 1970s. DSM-5 has responded to this predicament through the proliferation of ever more precise labels. Against this backdrop, the fundamental question that our conference aims to explore is: how do changing classifications of sexuality and gender in DSM-5 navigate wider cultural discourses about morality and human nature? Our conference will bring together an interdisciplinary range of scholars: members of the DSM-5s Sexual and Gender Id entity Disorders Work Group, mental health practitioners, activists, sociologists, political scientists, ethicists, historians and philosophers. We aim to generate new conceptual and substantive work on the interaction between psychiatry and culture, pioneering analyses of the sexual classifications produced by DSM-5, which are expected to be used globally for decades to come.

Amount: £2,320
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

"Leprosy, language and identity in the medieval world" to be held at Cambridge on 5-6 April 2011 14 Dec 2010

This international workshop aims to bring together leading scholars and early career researchers in medieval history, archaeology, palaeopathology, literature and art history to address a multifaceted theme: leprosy, language and identity in the medieval world. The issues of language and identity are central to numerous questions about lepers, leprosy and: leprosaria (leper hospitals) in the Middle Ages, and to broader issues relating to disease from ancient to modern times. There will be ample opportunity for discussion, both formal and: informal, to encourage dialogue between scholars from different disciplines and produce new ideas and conclusions. The: workshop will consist of three 50-minute presentations by keynote speakers (Luke Demaitre, Carole Rawcliffe and Francois-Olivier Touati), approximately ten 20-minute papers, and a roundtable discussion to conclude the second day. The papers will later be published in a volume edited by Elm a Brenner and Peter Murray Jones, marking a much-needed interdisciplinary publication on this topic. The meeting also aims to bring scholars of medieval medicine to the University of Cambridge, where the Department of History & Philosophy of Science is a major centre for the history of medicine. There will be a visit to the Department's Whipple Library on the first day of the workshop.

Amount: £4,520
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

Biomedical Vacation Scholarships. 06 Jun 2011

Not available

Amount: £1,440
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

A transcriptional network downstream ofNo tail a in zebrafish embryonic development. 15 Feb 2010

The primary aim of this project is to further characterize a gene regulatory network (GRN) downstream of the transcription factor No tail a (Ntla), an orthologue of Brachyury in the zebrafish Danio rerio. This transcription factor has a vital and highly conserved role in mesoderm development. Recent work in the lab has used chromatin immunoprecipitation to identify cis regulatory regions proximal to 218 genes that Ntla binds to during gastrulation. These are candidate Ntla target genes, but in order for them to be incorporated in to the GRN downstream of Ntla, further characterisation of the regulatory relationships between Ntla and these genes must be performed. Interestingly, 58 of the putative Ntla target genes encode transcription factors themselves, suggesting a role for Ntla as a master regulator of transcription. In this project, we aim to investigate which of these potential transcription factor targets are indeed regulated by Ntla, and incorporate a small group of these in to the downstream transcriptional network. We also aim to analyse a single Ntla-regulated promoter in detail, investigating the roles of additional transcription factors in its combinatorial or antagonistic control, and characterising any enhancer modules that may control spatial or temporal differences in its expression.

Amount: £4,412
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

Decision-making concerning eating and drinking interventions for people with progressive neurological disease with and without decision-making capacity in the USA. 31 Mar 2015

Introduction: Decisions concerning eating and drinking for people with progressive neurological diseases are highly emotive and ethically challenging, particularly if the individual lacks decision-making capacity. These decisions are becoming increasingly common as the age of the UK population rises with the associated increase in the prevalence of neuro-degenerative diseases. In developing this project, our research group undertook a systematic literature review which revealed that most publish ed research into this area is based within the USA. Research question: How are decisions made concerning eating and drinking interventions for people with progressive neurological disease with and without decision-making capacity in the USA? Methods: Library-based research at Library of Congress and Georgetown University; 8-10 semi-structured US clinician interviews. Outcomes: (1) Research paper examining policy and best-practice on decision-making for people with progressive neurologic al disease in the USA (2) Academic and clinician network for future international collaborations (3) Establish an evidence base on policy and best practice internationally This grant provides excellent value for money as it will enable: a focused three month research project based in Washington, D.C.; and provide funds for a meeting of international collaborators to establish a network for a future project and funding bid.

Amount: £4,355
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

Student Elective Prize for Mr Thomas Edward Parks 29 Aug 2008

Rates of Misdiagnosis of Acute Rheumatic Fever at Regional Health Centres in FIJI

Amount: £1,600
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge