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Results

A novel nanoparticle/microneedle array patch (MAP) combination 27 Apr 2017

The overall aim is to design, prepare and evaluate novel nanoparticle/microneedle array patch (MAP) combinations for prevention of HIV infection. The key objectives are: Design, produce and characterise dissolving microneedles Combine long-acting anti-retroviral nanoparticles and microneedles in composite MAPs Study MAP performance in vitro and extrapolate to human treatment

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Queen's University Belfast

Oxytocin delivery using a microarray patch for postpartum haemorrhage 31 May 2018

This project involves development of a novel microarray patch (MAP) device for the delivery of oxytocin to prevent and treat post-partum haemorrhage (PPH). Oxytocin is recommended by the World Health Organisation as the gold-standard treatment for PPH but is often not available in low income countries as it requires cold storage and a trained health professional to administer the injection. Polymeric MAPs are minimally invasive devices, consisting of an array of micro projections, up to 600 µm in length. On application they painlessly penetrate the outermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum and imbibe interstitial skin fluid. This causes the matrix to swell and creates a continuous network through which oxytocin would reach the systemic circulation. Oxytocin would be formulated in to a drug reservoir that is separate from the MAP, such as a lyophilised tablet, which could increase its stability. Several key parameters need to be tested: 1. Ability to load adequate oxytocin levels in to a drug reservoir. 2. Ability of an adequate concentration of oxytocin to permeate the skin with a MAP and the time taken to reach therapeutic levels. 3. Stability of oxytocin in the drug reservoir at 40oC and 75% relative humidity.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Queen's University Belfast

Microneedle delivery of the anti-psychotic medicine haloperidol decanoate 31 May 2018

This project involves development of a novel dissolving microneedle array device, incorporating a nano suspension of haloperidol decanoate to provide transdermal delivery of a formulation that will dissolve in skin and act as a depot. Dissolving microneedle arrays are minimally invasive devices, consisting of an array of micro projections arranged on a baseplate in a defined configuration. These microneedles, up to 600 µm in length, are hard in the dry state and when applied to the skin using manual thumb pressure, painlessly penetrate the outermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum. The needle tips dissolve in interstitial fluid releasing the nano suspension formulation into the viable skin tissue. Haloperidol can then be slowly and constantly be release over long periods of time to maintain constant plasma levels. A number of key parameters need to be assessed: 1. Nanosuspension formulation using a nano precipitate/ultra sonification method 2. Nanosuspension physicochemical characterisation for particle size and zeta potential 3. Formulation of microneedle arrays using aqueous blends of biocompatible polymers 4. In skin dissolution of the microneedle formulations

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Queen's University Belfast

3D printable antimicrobial materials for the development of safer medical devices 31 May 2018

Nosocomial infections primarily result from bacterial attachment to surfaces and biofilm formation, for example of implanted medical devices. Such infections demonstrate significant resistance to antibacterial treatment, resulting in extended hospital stays, increased healthcare costs, patient morbidity and potential mortality. The incorporation of antibiotics into the surface of a medical device could prevent bacterial colonization but it contributes to the antibiotic resistance problem. A good approach to prevent this is to prepare medical devices with inherent antimicrobial properties. In the present work, we propose development of 3D printable materials containing an antimicrobial biomolecule obtained from renewable sources, lignin. For this purpose, lignin will be combined with two different 3D printable materials: poly(lactic acid) (PLA), to create solid coatings, and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), to create hydrogel coatings. The present project combines the versatility of 3D printing for the preparation of medical materials with the antimicrobial properties of lignin with the aim of creating safer, greener and cheaper medical materials. The main goals of the project are: Preparation of PLA-lignin and PVA-lignin hybrid materials for 3D printing Characterization of the resulting 3D printed materials Evaluation of the antimicrobial properties of the resulting 3D printed materials

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Queen's University Belfast

A Clinical Research Facility for Northern Ireland: Building Award. 11 May 2006

This proposal for a Clinical Research Facility (CRF) and associated 3T MRI scanner is submitted on behalf of six partners: Queen's University Belfast (QUB); The University of Ulster (UU); the Royal Group of Hospitals Trust (RGHT); the Belfast City Hospital Trust (BCHT); The Northern Ireland Regional Medical Physics Agency and the Research & Development Office for the Health & Personal Social Services (R&D Office). The CRF and scanner will be core resources for the Northern Ireland (NI) research community and will act as a focus for clinical research. The CRF will provide a high quality clinical environment in which patients can undergoresearch programmes safely and effectively according to robust, ethically approved trial protocols. Under the leadership of the Director and Deputy Director, trained research nurses and other support staff, including those in the nearby Clinical Research Support Centre (CRSC), will work with Principal Investigators from the Trusts and Universities to develop, evaluate and implement research protocols. Researchers using the facility will be supported by administrative and laboratory services, and have access to the full range of clinical and non-clinical services provided by both Trusts. The CRF will be based in central Belfast on the RGHT site; QUB will be the co-ordinating University. It will be situated within phase 2b of the major hospital redevelopment currently underway, which is due for completion in 2010. The CRF will be on the seventh floor, immediately above the Intensive Care Unit and contiguous with the Education Centre. The building will link directly with all patient care areas and with new state-of-the-art imaging and cardiology centres currently being completed in phase 2a of the redevelopment project. This includes the latest generation of Positron Emission Tomography (PET/CT) imaging, which is operated on a partnership basis between QUB, RGHT, BCHT, the Medical Physics Agency and the HPSS R&D Office. The CRF will consist of a suite of six rooms equipped for clinical investigation and collection and processing of biological samples. There will also be a patient waiting and reception area, a diet kitchen and an administrative area. The approximate floor area will be 380m2, and the cost of the space within the new building on the RGHT site will be £1.8 million. The CRF will include designated space for: 1) studies and trials requiring psychophysical assessment of visual function and in vivo imaging of ocular structures; 2) cardiorespiratory function testing; 3) assessment of vascular function and insulin resistance; 4) three multipurpose clinical rooms equipped for patient consultation; 5) a tissue and biological sample processing laboratory, to allow rapid processing of biological samples and temporary storage prior to analysis. 6) a kitchen, suitable for the preparation of meals for dietary studies; 7) a waiting and reception area. The 3T MRI scanner will be situated within 1km of the CRF in the Northern Ireland Cancer Centre on the BCHT site, which will open in April 2006. RGHT and BCHT are the two major NI teaching hospitals, and will merge as a single Trust in 2007. They provide all regional services and support a series of clinical networks involving all NI Trusts. The Cancer Centre represents a major NHS investment in cancer care in Northern Ireland and incorporates a state-of-the-art Radiotherapy Suite, including eight linear accelerators, and a Radiology Suite which includes diagnostic MRI, CT scanning, interventional radiology, ultrasound general x-ray and nuclear medicine providing diagnostic and unsealed source therapies. The NICC has provided space to expand such facilities into its building as research and clinical studies demand. The Cancer Centre also has access to the PET/CT based in RGHT and described above. The Cancer Centre has provided space to expand such facilities into the Cancer Centre as research and clinical studies demand. To complement the NHS Clinical Cancer Centre, QUB is building a new £22M Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology nearby. The Centre's research programme will bring together clinical and laboratory experts from across the University University and will facilitate the translation of basic science into novel clinical developments. Work on the newbuilding has commenced and is due for completion in March 2007. The University of Ulster's Biomedical Sciences Research Institute is located in a £14.5M Centre for Molecular Biosciences Building, completed in November 2004. The Director and Deputy Director of the CRF will be employed by QUB and UU respectively, either from newly-appointed or existing staff. They will report to a Management Board that will include representatives of the partner organisations. The Director of the 3T MRI facility will be employed by QUB/BCHT, and will report to the same Management Board. The CRF and scanner will facilitate internationally excellent experimental medicine and translational research, drawing on existing strengths within the NI research community and helping to attract new expertise to the region. In addition, the CRF will encourage new researchers and clinicians to participate in emerging disease-specific networks within NI as part of the UK Clinical Research Network (UKCRN) and to participate in other clinical research initiatives flowing from the UK Clinical Research Collaboration (UKCRC).

Amount: £805,501
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Queen's University Belfast

Acquisition of a flow cytometry cell sorter 30 Apr 2009

The Centres for Infection and Immunity (CII) and for Cancer Research and Cell Biology (CCRCB) at Queen's University Belfast (QUB) are jointly requesting funding to acquire a new state-of-the-art multi-parametric Fluorescent Activating Cell Sorting flow cytometer (Becton Dickinson ARIA II). We currently do not have access to a functional FACS flow cytometer, and the local availability of a FACS flow cytometer would have an immediate impact on a number of research groups within the two centres by facilitating progress in novel research directions that are currently unavailable to us. Named investigators require the ability to purify pure populations of specific cell types to define their bearing on important diseases involving inflammation, viral infection, and cancer. The CII and CCRCB bring together internationally competitive and multidisciplinary research groups of the highest quality to improve patient care through both basic fundamental and translational research programs for which access to a FACS flow cytometry is primordial. QUB has agreed to contribute to 25% of purchasing cost of a new BD FACS ARIA II, and therefore we are requesting for 75% of the purchasing cost and 5 years funding for the maintenance costs of the machine totalling 193,555.50 from the Wellcome Trust.

Amount: £193,556
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Queen's University Belfast

Small molecule inhibitors of the anti-apoptotic FLIP-FADD protein-protein interaction for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer 14 Jul 2014

In most organs and tissues, old cells are constantly dying and being replaced by new cells. This balance is critical for normal organ/tissue function and is maintained by a balance between new cells being created by cell division and old cells dying by a process known as "apoptosis".One of the key characteristics of cancers is that the old cells do not die efficiently by apoptosis and therefore accumulate giving rise to a tumour that ultimately disrupts organ function. This block in apoptosis is also a major problem when it comes to treating cancers as the effectiveness of chemotherapies and radiotherapies usually rely on their ability to activate this type of cell death. Professor David Haigh¹s team at Queen¹s University of Belfast have identified an intra-cellular protein called "FLIP" that plays a critical role in preventing the death of cancer cells treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. This protein plays a prominent role in increasing the resistance to therapy in a number of types of cancer, including non-small cell lung cancer, which is a particularly drug-resistant cancer and is the focus of this proposal. The project team plan to generate drugs to block FLIP's function and thereby overcome drug resistance and improve the therapeutic management of patients with this disease.

Amount: £1,294,884
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Queen's University Belfast

Small molecule inhibitors of the anti-apoptotic FLIP-FADD protein-protein interaction for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer 17 Jan 2014

In most organs and tissues, old cells are constantly dying and being replaced by new cells. This balance is critical for normal organ/tissue function and is maintained by a balance between new cells being created by cell division and old cells dying by a process known as "apoptosis".One of the key characteristics of cancers is that the old cells do not die efficiently by apoptosis and therefore accumulate giving rise to a tumour that ultimately disrupts organ function. This block in apoptosis is also a major problem when it comes to treating cancers as the effectiveness of chemotherapies and radiotherapies usually rely on their ability to activate this type of cell death. Professor David Haigh¹s team at Queen¹s University of Belfast have identified an intra-cellular protein called "FLIP" that plays a critical role in preventing the death of cancer cells treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. This protein plays a prominent role in increasing the resistance to therapy in a number of types of cancer, including non-small cell lung cancer, which is a particularly drug-resistant cancer and is the focus of this proposal. The project team plan to generate drugs to block FLIP's function and thereby overcome drug resistance and improve the therapeutic management of patients with this disease.

Amount: £656,764
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Queen's University Belfast

Open access award 2011/12. 20 Sep 2011

Not available

Amount: £20,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Queen's University Belfast

Heritage Connects: history, community and public health 10 Mar 2016

This project will collaborate with a major MRC-funded study of the health impacts of a new urban greenway in Belfast to explore the potential of engagement with heritage to reduce health inequalities and enhance social capital among urban communities. Taking two historic parks in east Belfast as a case study, it will employ a mixture of quantitative and qualitative surveys, focus groups and public engagement activities with the communities living near them to assess the role of heritage in individuals’ and communities' wellbeing and health behaviours and the factors which influence this. Key goals - elicit baseline data on existing levels of engagement with heritage in the area and the factors which encourage or prevent this - generate essential data for a programme of research and engagement focused on heritage and health behaviours in different urban contexts - enhance our understanding of the relationship between urban communites, class, social capital and health behaviours and the role that heritage can play in this. - develop a methodology for impacting on health behaviours through enhanced engagement with heritage in urban contexts - provide proof-of-concept for the inclusion of a heritage dimension to other studies of urban health and well-being

Amount: £32,873
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Queen's University Belfast

Material Objects on the Journey of Life: investigating the potential of material objects to make visible the lived experience of old age. 31 May 2016

This inter-disciplinary research project investigates how material objects can illuminate lived experience of old age. It is a collaboration between researchers at Queen’s University Belfast, the Arts Council of Northern Ireland and a visual artist. It is designed as a pilot for a Collaborative Award in the Humanities and Social Science in 2017. The contribution of this project will be to enhance public perceptions of ageing, by providing meaningful, engaging and tangible representations of old age in its social context. The project aims to advance socio-historical and cultural understandings of healthy old age, which lag behind biomedical research on ageing. This funding will allow our team to work with six older people to explore the meaning of material objects which are personal to them. Project goals are to recruit older people from the Arts and Older People programme at the Art Council NI who will provide six material objects; to run a one day workshop where older people will work with visual artist, Gemma Hodge to produce 36 pieces of art (casts/photographs/paintings sculptures); an exhibition of these works, and qualitative interviews with participants. We will also assess the strengths and weaknesses of the project to inform a larger research proposal.

Amount: £4,877
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Queen's University Belfast

Robert McCarrison, the Hunzas and Organic Movements, 1900-1966 30 Nov 2015

The project examines how Dr Robert McCarrison’s researches for the IMS in India in the early C20th into the effects of the supposed diets of Indian 'tribes' on rats was deployed by the organic movements, which emerged in Britain and the USA, to highlight the deleterious effects of modernization and industrialised diets, particularly on the working classes. It also investigates the ways in which racial and class anxieties played a role in shaping the nutritional science and environmentalist discourses which emerged during this period. I am applying to the WT to fund one month of research in London to engage in a preliminary examination of the archival sources available there necessary to develop my project and to make a later bid for a WT's Investigator Award to fund this project. Whilst I have outlined archival material in India, Northern Ireland and the USA, I am seeking funds at this stage solely to examine the array of material housed in the BL and the WT Library, such as contemporary articles in medical journals on nutritional sciences and wellbeing, works authored by McCarrison, and newspaper reports concerning C20th Organic movements and their discursive deployment of an imagined 'East' to critique the 'West.'

Amount: £2,515
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Queen's University Belfast

Grant awarded to Retired and Senior Volunteer Programme of CSV (North East) 10 Apr 2001

Towards a worker for the North East to recruit older volunteers.

LifeLines 20 Apr 2016

This is the expansion of a project supporting volunteers aged 50 plus to run activities for vulnerable older people to improve health and well-being. These have previously included art classes, creative writing, yoga and computer club. The group will expand across the city, recruiting more volunteers, supporting more than 800 new people and establishing a Men’s Network to encourage older men to socialise regularly. It will also extend its HealthLink scheme to help older people get to medical appointments.

Young Voices (Volunteering Opportunities in Community Environments) 11 Oct 2006

Young Voices is a three year project that will develop and deliver a creative and engaging programme of volunteering opportunities for young people to enable them to build skills and confidence in a key community environment, that of their local library. CSV will work in partnership with Halton, Manchester, and Oldham Library Services to develop this project.

Amount: £125,000
Funder: The Big Lottery Fund
Recipient: Volunteering Matters
Region: London
District: Islington London Boro

Community Healthy Living Advisor Volunteers 22 Jun 2006

The Manchester branch of Community Service Volunteers runs a range of projects that encourage people to take up learning via its Media Clubhouse. With this award it will deliver workshops, led by a qualified nutritionist, aimed at individuals who want to become volunteer healthy living advisors. The volunteers will be recruited from groups with multiple disadvantages as well as minority groups based in and around the City Centre.

Amount: £5,000
Funder: The Big Lottery Fund
Recipient: Volunteering Matters
Region: North West
District: Manchester District

Volunteer Britain 14 Jul 2005

Community Service Volunteers (CSV) works to reconnect people to their community through volunteering and training and to enrich people?s lives. This project will produce short audio and visual clips on volunteer's experiences, produced by the volunteers themselves. CSV will showcase the clips in order to recognise their efforts and promote volunteering to others, through radio, TV and at local community events. This will be done in conjunction with the 'Year of the Volunteer' campaign.

Amount: £49,056
Funder: The Big Lottery Fund
Recipient: Volunteering Matters
Region: London
District: Islington London Boro

Older people volunteering at primary schools 11 Jan 2005

The project will empower older people to take an active part in their communities by giving them the opportunity to take the lead in designing and delivering voluntary services to support the development of children in Hackney and Tower Hamlets. Older volunteers will work in primary schools to provide support for pupils, especially those for whom English is an additional language.

Amount: £43,840
Funder: The Big Lottery Fund
Recipient: Volunteering Matters
Region: London
District: Islington London Boro

CSV 15 Apr 2009

This organisation will set up a new sustainability initiative, creating a website for schools and their communities in the highlands to share experiences. The website will focus on eco projects, learning new ways to live sustainably, preserving energy and actioning change. The grant will be used to pay for website design, event staff costs, catering and volunteer expenses.

Amount: £5,400
Funder: The Big Lottery Fund
Recipient: Volunteering Matters
Region: Scotland
District: Highland

FIND OUT (Families In Ipswich Nurturing and Development) and OUTreach 17 Mar 2009

This project works with parents and children aged 12-16 to help parents engage with and understand youth sub-culture through multimedia activities including film, radio, multi-media, music and arts projects. Issues of identity and behaviour will be explored by using 'Life Story' books, video diaries and talking families through a journey of their heritage.

Amount: £295,286
Funder: The Big Lottery Fund
Recipient: Volunteering Matters
Region: London
District: Islington London Boro