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Results

Student electives for Cemile Kalkan and Randal Stronge. 19 Jul 2006

Characterisation of sensory neurons produced by pluripotent mouse neural crest-like stem cells The regulation of cell determination is a central issue in developmental biology. There has been much recent interest in postnatal stem cells and their unexpectedly broad differentiation capacity because of the potential therapeutic implications. We established from neonatal mouse skin three immortal, pluripotent stem cell lines that resemble neural crest stem cells and are capable of producing at least three cell lineages (melanoblasts/melanocytes, neurons and Schwann precursor cells).They promise to be valuable tools for study of cell determination. Neuronal differentiation of these cell lines is the least well characterised. We plan to expose pluripotent neural crest-like stem cells to growth/differentiation factors known to control determination of sensory neurons in short-term cultures: brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophic factor (NT3), fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) and nerve growth factor (NGF). We have preliminary data showing that in the presence of these factors very long bipolar neuron-like cells and large, dendritic cells resembling sensory neurons appear in the cultures. The student will repeat and confirm these observations, analysing and recording changes of cell morphology using photo microscopy. He will also study effect of these factors on cell proliferation by counting cell numbers before and some time after growing the cells in the presence of these growth actors by haemocytometer. To test whether morphologically different cells are indeed sensory neurons he will perform immunocytochemical analysis of these cells by using a marker of sensory neurons (substance P) and neuronal markers (neuronal tubulin beta 3 and a neurofilament subunit).

Amount: £2,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: St George's University of London

VALUE IN PEOPLE AWARD. 30 Aug 2006

Not available

Amount: £200,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: St George's University of London

Allergen Delivery Inhibitors: Preclinical evaluation Allergen DeliveryInhibitors offer the potential to combine alleviation of asthma with allergy prophylaxis using small molecule inhaled therapy. 19 Dec 2007

Researchers at St George’s, University of London and the University of Manchester have employed structure-based drug design to develop inhibitors that selectively target house dust mite cysteine peptidases, enzymes that make significant contributions to the development, maintenance and escalation of allergic diseases including asthma. The programme’s candidate drug (CD 1) displays in vivo efficacy in animal models with a good duration of action when delivered to the airways. CD 1 is supported by several developable back-up compounds from chemically distinct and mechanistically distinct series. A patent portfolio is being created and Technology Transfer is seeking a development and commercialisation partner for this programme.

Amount: £67,925
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: St George's University of London

Human GM3 synthase deficiency: a new severe epilepsy syndrome. 06 Feb 2007

To determine the biochemical basis for severe epilepsy in a new human disease resulting from defective ganglioside biosynthesis. Set up a fluorescent GM3 synthase assay to measure GM3 synthase activity in cultured fibroblasts from carriers and patients. Look for evidence of alternative enzyme up-regulation that may account for a milder phenotype in a sub-set of patients with GM3 synthase deficiency. Characterise cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) glycosphingolipid (GSL) profiles of carriers and patients to determine relative flux through the o-series pathway in the absence of GM3 synthase. Study the neutral and charged GSL pathways in the asymptomatic GM3 synthase null mouse brain and blood cells. Investigate the potential of exogenous GM3 to restore synthesis of complex gangliosides in patient fibroblasts and in the mouse model by intracerebroventricular GM3 infusion. "Stop codon read-through" with gentamicin may be a therapeutic option and will be tested in patient fibroblasts. Use RNA interference in murine and human neuronal cultures to evaluate up and down- regulation of genes as well as alternative pathways in response to GM3 synthase knockdown. Study plasma of patients with other epilepsy phenotypes to determine if any are associated with abnormal GSL metabolism.

Amount: £9,650
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: St George's University of London

Researchers at St George’s, University of London and the University of Manchester have employed structure-based drug design to develop inhibitors that selectively target house dust mite cysteine peptidases, enzymes that make significant contributions to the development, maintenance and escalation of allergic diseases including asthma. The programme’s candidate drug (CD 1) displays in vivo efficacy in animal models with a good duration of action when delivered to the airways. CD 1 is supported by 27 Nov 2008

Researchers at St George’s, University of London and the University of Manchester have employed structure-based drug design to develop inhibitors that selectively target house dust mite cysteine peptidases, enzymes that make significant contributions to the development, maintenance and escalation of allergic diseases including asthma. The programme’s candidate drug (CD 1) displays in vivo efficacy in animal models with a good duration of action when delivered to the airways. CD 1 is supported by several developable back-up compounds from chemically distinct and mechanistically distinct series. A patent portfolio is being created and Technology Transfer is seeking a development and commercialisation partner for this programme.

Amount: £19,087
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: St George's University of London

Open Access Awards. 16 Sep 2008

Not available

Amount: £30,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: St George's University of London

Institutional Strategic Support Fund 2012/13 17 Oct 2012

Facilitating collaboration: A key element of the strategy of all research institutes is to prioritise collaboration, particularly at inter-institutional and inter-university level In 2014-15 ISSF intended use is:(a) Bridging funds(b) Core technical support(c) Strategic investment in equipment(d) PhD studentships in collaboration with external partners(e) Public engagement Bridging funds (£120K)The objective is to facilitate retention of key staff. Up to 6 months salary can be committed to research staff (excluding PhD students) who are approaching the end of their research contracts. Core technical support (£180K)We will continue with our previous strategy of supporting key core services that are of value toISSF 05/148multiple research groups and provide opportunities to establish new research collaborations Strategic investment in equipment (£125K)As in previous years, we will use ISSF to provide funding for significant pieces of equipment that have multi-user applications and support the Research Institutes strategies, particularly where added value can be generated for Wellcome Trust funded research PhD studentships in collaboration with external partners (£50K)A key pillar of the research strategy at St. George’s is to support early career researchers (ECR) to build research teams and establish themselves with independent research programmes. Public engagement (£25K)Public engagement (PE) at St. George’s has taken a massive step forward as a result of ISSF support and the budget for PE activities has increased each year. Wandsworth Prison Science ClubWorking with Claire Fairclough on the Education team at HMP Wandsworth, we have begun consultation to create a science club. Application for additional strategic infrastructural support (£250K)A proposal for a GCLP suite of laboratories for development of diagnostic tests in collaboration with industry partners.The newly created Centre for Diagnostics and Antimicrobial Resistance (CDAR) is part of the Institute for Infection and Immunity at SGUL. this proposal is for funding to develop new strategic infrastructure for CDAR that will specifically allow early stage commercial development of diagnostic devices at St. George’s with industrial partners. Appointment of an Associate Dean to focus on Career Development of Research Staff.b) Introduction of a part-time, portfolio-based Postgraduate Certificate in Research Skills bringing together various core and optional development opportunities and supported by an individual mentor. This course has been commended by its external examiners and by Vitae as an example of excellent practice in researcher career development.c) Implementation of a requirement that all staff with management responsibility for research engage positively with researcher’s skills and career development, including regular probation, review and performance management meetings.

Amount: £500,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: St George's University of London

A randomized trial to evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of 1200mg and 1800mg rifampicin daily for 4 months in the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis 27 May 2015

Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the major causes of death in the world, responsible for 1.5 million deaths annually. Currently, the most effective form of control of tuberculosis is treatment of clinical disease. The current WHO recommended 6 month regimen for the treatment of TB is too long. An estimated 15% of patients worldwide do not successfully complete treatment. If treatment duration could be reduced, adherence and cure rates would improve, and treatment costs would decrease. Of the four drugs in standard tuberculosis treatment, rifampicin and pyrazinamide are responsible for most of the sterilising activity. Increasing the dose of rifampicin both results in significantly greater M. tuberculosis killing in pre clinical studies, and also in greater early bactericidal activity in the sputum of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. Preliminary results suggest that, unlike pyrazinamide, higher doses of rifampicin are safe. The principal objectives of the trial are: 1)To determine whether an increase in the daily dose of rifampicin from 600 mg to 1200 or 1800mg results in more rapid sterilisation of the lungs, allowing a reduction of treatment duration to 4 months. 2) To assess whether the increased dose results in an increase in serious (grade 3 or 4) adverse events. In this multicentre randomised, controlled clinical trial, 654 smear positive patients with pulmonary tuberculosis will be randomly allocated to either the standard 6 month regimen, or a 4 month regimen with rifampicin at 1200 or 1800mg daily and other drugs at standard dose. They will be followed up for 12 months after stopping treatment, with monthly clinical, sputum and laboratory examinations. If the new regimen is shown to be effective and safe, results will be presented to the WHO and to National Tuberculosis Control Programmes and to the wider academic community, to inform treatment guidelines and routine practice. If positive,the results of this trial will have major public health benefit.

Amount: £422,318
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: St George's University of London

Open access award 2015/16. 21 Sep 2015

Not available

Amount: £30,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: St George's University of London

Impact of early infectious and microbial exposures on the development of immunity and allergic inflammatory diseases in children living in a tropical region of Ecuador. 01 Apr 2015

xposures to geohelminth and other infectious and microbial substances in early life provide important signals for the development and regulation of human immunity and are likely to affect the later development of allergic and other inflammatory diseases. Geohelminth infections and enteric microbes are likely to affect also immune responses to vaccines, particularly those administered via the oral route. A birth cohort of 2,300 infants will be used to examine the role of early life infectiou s and microbial exposures on: 1. The development of immunity in early life in the Tropics, 2. The development of protective immunity to vaccines in infancy and childhood. 3. The developmen of inflammation (i.e. allergic sensitization) in childhood, 4. The development of allergic inflammatory diseases, specifically, asthma and eczema, in childhood. 5. Explore gene-geohelminth interactions in the development of allergic sensitization and allergic inflammatory diseases

Amount: £150,514
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: St George's University of London

Developing a nutritional intervention to increase cereal fibre intakes in UK South Asian children 14 Dec 2015

High rates of type 2 diabetes (T2D) represent a major public health challenge both nationally and globally. Within the UK, South Asian adults have high T2D risks, while South Asian children already have higher insulin resistance (a precursor of T2D risk). Observational studies in adults suggest that increasing cereal fibre intake may reduce T2D risk; I have shown in children aged 9-10 years that regular consumption of a high fibre breakfast cereal is associated with lower insulin resistance. A `proof of concept’ efficacy trial is needed to examine whether increasing cereal fibre intake reduces insulin resistance in children. The present proposal will prepare for such a trial by developing and evaluating the acceptability, feasibility and fidelity of an intervention to increase breakfast cereal fibre intake in South Asian children aged 9-10 years. Key goals include i) developing and assessing acceptability of the intervention using quantitative surveys, palatability tests and focus groups in children and parents, and ii) examining intervention fidelity in an RCT using objective as well as subjective markers of fibre intake. The results will underpin the development of a definitive efficacy trial examining the effects of increasing breakfast cereal fibre intake on insulin resistance in children.

Amount: £89,940
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: St George's University of London

Grant awarded to Retired and Senior Volunteer Programme of CSV (North East) 10 Apr 2001

Towards a worker for the North East to recruit older volunteers.

LifeLines 20 Apr 2016

This is the expansion of a project supporting volunteers aged 50 plus to run activities for vulnerable older people to improve health and well-being. These have previously included art classes, creative writing, yoga and computer club. The group will expand across the city, recruiting more volunteers, supporting more than 800 new people and establishing a Men’s Network to encourage older men to socialise regularly. It will also extend its HealthLink scheme to help older people get to medical appointments.

Young Voices (Volunteering Opportunities in Community Environments) 11 Oct 2006

Young Voices is a three year project that will develop and deliver a creative and engaging programme of volunteering opportunities for young people to enable them to build skills and confidence in a key community environment, that of their local library. CSV will work in partnership with Halton, Manchester, and Oldham Library Services to develop this project.

Amount: £125,000
Funder: The Big Lottery Fund
Recipient: Volunteering Matters
Region: London
District: Islington London Boro

Community Healthy Living Advisor Volunteers 22 Jun 2006

The Manchester branch of Community Service Volunteers runs a range of projects that encourage people to take up learning via its Media Clubhouse. With this award it will deliver workshops, led by a qualified nutritionist, aimed at individuals who want to become volunteer healthy living advisors. The volunteers will be recruited from groups with multiple disadvantages as well as minority groups based in and around the City Centre.

Amount: £5,000
Funder: The Big Lottery Fund
Recipient: Volunteering Matters
Region: North West
District: Manchester District

Volunteer Britain 14 Jul 2005

Community Service Volunteers (CSV) works to reconnect people to their community through volunteering and training and to enrich people?s lives. This project will produce short audio and visual clips on volunteer's experiences, produced by the volunteers themselves. CSV will showcase the clips in order to recognise their efforts and promote volunteering to others, through radio, TV and at local community events. This will be done in conjunction with the 'Year of the Volunteer' campaign.

Amount: £49,056
Funder: The Big Lottery Fund
Recipient: Volunteering Matters
Region: London
District: Islington London Boro