Cookies disclaimer

I agree Our site saves small pieces of text information (cookies) on your device in order to deliver better content and for statistical purposes. You can disable the usage of cookies by changing the settings of your browser. By browsing our website without changing the browser settings you grant us permission to store that information on your device.

Current Filters

Currency:
GBP
Recipients:
Volunteering Matters
University College Dublin

Filter By

Recipient Organizations (clear)
University of Oxford (1,569) University of Cambridge (1,282) University College London (1,143) Imperial College London (748) University of Edinburgh (718) Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust (565) King's College London (519) University of Manchester (443) University of Bristol (420) London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (391) University of Glasgow (335) University of Dundee (312) University of Liverpool (307) Newcastle University (299) The Royal British Legion (299) University of Birmingham (298) Cardiff University (259) University of Leeds (235) King's College London (217) Queen Mary University of London (190) University of Warwick (182) University of York (177) Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (173) University of Nottingham (173) University of Sheffield (171) Merched Y Wawr (159) University of Exeter (153) University of Leicester (149) Barnardo's (134) University of Southampton (125) The Scout Association (119) The Guide Association (118) Alzheimer's Society (112) University College Dublin (108) University of Aberdeen (107) Church of England Children's Society (103) Institute of Cancer Research (100) Birkbeck University of London (96) The National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty (93) Cruse Bereavement Care (90) Queen's University Belfast (89) University of Sussex (88) St George's University of London (87) The National Childbirth Trust (86) Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (86) Education Services - Headquarters (85) Volunteering Matters (83) University of St Andrews (78) Medical Research Council (73) National University of Ireland Galway (72) See Less

Results

Grant to Volunteering Matters 23 Mar 2015

The men go forth to Battle, the women wait and knit

Amount: £9,800
Funder: The National Lottery Heritage Fund
Recipient: Volunteering Matters
Region: North East
District: County Durham

Grant awarded to Community Service Volunteers (Training and Enterprise NE) (Tyne & Wear) 10 Mar 2009

To provide support and mentoring to people with mental health problems to help them volunteer in Newcastle.

Grant awarded to Community Service Volunteers (Training and Enterprise NE) (Tyne & Wear) 13 Jul 2004

To provide daycare services to older people living in high rise flats in Newcastle.

Positive Futures London 18 Nov 2015

This project, based on a established youth-led volunteering model is expanding as a result of self-referrals and is being delivered in Hackney, Haringey and Tower Hamlets. It will support young people aged 13 to 25 to deliver volunteering and social action projects which they have identified to be of benefit to the local community. The aim of project is that all of the young people who are participating in it will develop key skills and have positive experiences that will shape their personal development.

Amount: £387,576
Funder: The Big Lottery Fund
Recipient: Volunteering Matters
Region: London
District: Hackney London Boro

A comparision of 3D printed anatomical models against tissue equivalent models under x-ray conditions 31 May 2018

This project involves designing and production of human anatomical models by Fused Deposition Modelling which is a form of 3D printing.This technology has existed since the 1970's and in the past five years has become much more affordable allowing researchers to explore its usefulness in medical education and in patient-specific surgical planning. Once the 3D printed model is made, it will be imaged under X-ray at the diagnostic imaging department, in order to assess image quality and the human-tissue equivalency of the printed materials. Key goals include; - modelling & slicing of anatomical 3D meshes - production & optimisation of a 3D printed model - X-Ray imaging of this model - Utilisation of ImageJ software to assess the tissue equivalency of this model vs. human images & pre-existing tissue equivalent phantoms - presentation of findings at the UCD SSRA research event. This model will be anatomically correct, customisable and contain a range of tissue equivalent materials that can be X-rayed. The model will be useful in anatomy education as it will provide tutors with a customisable learning aid and accompnaying diagnostic images. Together, these will serve to enrich the learning experience for students.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College Dublin

Interaction of Schmallenberg virus with human and sheep cells 31 May 2018

The research laboratory of Dr. Gerald Barry is interested in understanding how viruses interact with their host on a protein level. An ongoing project in his group is examining the interaction of Schmallenberg virus (SBV), a virus of the Peribunyaviridae, with mammalian cells from different species. SBV causes congenital abnormalities in calves and lambs. The virus causes little problems in adult animals but can infect the foetus, causing malformations and abortions. Schmallenberg emerged in Europe in 2011 and is now endemic across most parts of western and central Europe, triggering small outbreaks on an annual basis. The Barry group has performed immunoprecipitation studies focusing on the NSs and the N protein of the virus and analysed interactions between them and cellular proteins. This work has led to the generation of 24 proteins of interest, that they now wish to interrogate using siRNA knockdown studies. I will focus on 5 proteins from this list, using siRNAs to knockdown their expression in mammalian cells to see if their loss impacts positively or negatively on the virus. Follow-on experiments and bioinformatic analysis will broaden our understanding of SBV interaction with cells, and help us to identify if the interactions are species specific.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College Dublin

The role of biofilm formation in colonic cell adherence by Streptococcus gallolyticus 31 May 2018

Streptococcus gallolyticus (S. gallolyticus) is commonly found in the gastrointestinal tract of ruminants. Interestingly it can cause endocarditis in humans by translocating through the GI tract at sites of colonic cancer lesions. Studies have indicated that S. gallolyticus is an excellent colonizer of the intestinal tract, forming strong biofilms via effective adherence properties (Abdulamir et al 2011). However little is known about what mechanisms these bacteria use to colonise the gut and invade the bloodstream. We have assembled a cohort of bloodstream isolates from patients across Europe and are sequencing their genomes. This project will characterise the biofilm forming capacity of the strains and compare the phenotypes of the strong and weak biofilm forming strains in growth conditions that mimic the environment of the colon (anaerobic and rich in bile salts). We will then test representative strains from the strong and weak biofilm forming groups to bind to and invade colonic epithelial cells in order to see whether biofilm forming capacity has an influence on colonic cell adherence and invasion. Finally we will test these strains for translocation across a colonic cell monolayer to see whether biofilm production by S. gallolyticus can facilitate invasion of the gut mucosa in humans.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College Dublin

Computational analysis of gene clusters from antimicrobial producing and pathogenic bacteria. 31 Jan 2017

This project will develop a novel method for the in silico prediction of the function of bacterial genes based on the analysis of their genomic neighbourhood, with a specific focus on genes of interest in infection biology. Indeed, bacterial genes involved in the same cellular "macro-function", such as a signalling or biosynthetic pathway, are often physically clustering together on the genome. The computational analysis of these gene clusters could help to uncover the role of currently uncharacterised genes in certain pathways. The prediction method will be developed and tested on a dataset of publicly available bacterial genomes. Then, it will be applied to the analysis of clusters putatively involved in the synthesis of peptide antimicrobials or in processes targeted by known antibiotics. Orthologous clusters will be compared to identify protein domains that tend to co-occur in similar clusters ("domain correlation"). However, sometimes two alternative domains may fulfil the same biochemical function. In such a case, these two domains may be present as alternatives within functionally related clusters. This results in an "anti-correlation" of these domains within that cluster. The final aim of this analysis will be the identification of new antimicrobial processing enzymes and possible novel drug targets.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College Dublin

Influence of Diet in Heart Failure: Role of Short Chain Fatty Acids in monocyte phenotype 27 Apr 2017

The aim of this project is to find out if small chain fatty acids (SCFA's) play a role in heart failure via their interaction with inflammatory cells and the regulation of inflammatory cytokine production that can lead to fibrosis and diastolic dysfunction. SCFA's are produced by the gut microbiota following the fermentation of soluble fibres that are contained in the diet. There is evidence of dramatic changes in gut microbiota populations in patients with heart failure and a clear link between heart failure and the amount of fibre in the diet. The presence of free fatty acid receptors (FFAR) on monocytes might link SCFA with the release of inflammatory cytokines possibly leading to progressive damage of the cardiovascular system. FFARs are expressed on monocytes and macrophages. This project will firstly quantify FFAR3 expression in a cohort of 44 patient-derived monocyte cDNA samples. FFAR3 expression will be correlated with previously aquired data on FFAR2 and inflammatory gene expression and serum cytokine data. Monocytes and macrophages are known to be the major drivers of inflammatory and fibrotic processes in heart failure. This project will investigate the role of SCFA's in regulating human macrophage differentiation in response to known drviers of M1/M2 phenotype.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College Dublin

Institutional Strategic Support Fund 07 Sep 2016

Not available

Amount: £300,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College Dublin

Characterising the viral ecology of native Irish bat species 30 Sep 2016

The aim of this project is to determine the virome of native Irish bat species (order Chiroptera). Bat species have been widely connected to recent epidemic zoonoses, such as Ebola and SARS (Leroy et al. 2005, Li et al. 2005). Recent analyses of chiropteran viral ecology in South America and west Africa have revealed a novel poxvirus (Baker et al. 2013) and a nairovirus with clear zoonotic potential (Ishii et al. 2014). However, few studies of bat diseases have occurred in the British Isles; all but one has focused on European Bat Lyssavirus (EBLV) distribution, and none have taken place in Ireland. This study will use the VIDISCA-454 (Virus Discovery cDNA-AFLP (Amplified Fragment-Length Polymorphism) combined with Roche 454 high-throughput sequencing) protocol (de Vries et al. 2011), using biological samples taken from wild bat populations. This method has been developed for the detection of viruses in biological samples through extraction and sequencing of capsid-enclosed nucleic acids. Sequence assembly will then be performed and analysed for potential viral sequences. This method, and close derivatives, has been applied successfully to several clinical samples in detection of unknown pathogens, including a bovine hepacivirus (Baechlein et al. 2015) and chiropteran parvoviruses (Canuti et al. 2011).

Amount: £7,156
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College Dublin

Genomic investigation of Verocytoxigenic Escherichia coli 31 May 2018

Verocytoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC) is defined by the elaboration of a potent cytotoxin. It is a highly pathogenic type of E.coli and causes a range of disorders including bloody diarrhoea, haemolytic uraemic syndrome, kidney disease and death. The project aims to investigate the genomic features associated with the unusually high incidence of this pathogen in Ireland. We will apply state-of-the-art bioinformatics approaches to determine which genes are most commonly found to co-occur outside the core genome. This will be carried out across three separate cohorts of strains. The modules created will be analysed for potential functions and subject to machine learning techniques to identify those associated with the Irish strains specifically and the clinical phenotype.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College Dublin

'An awfully ignorant mob' or 'Embryo doctors'?: Dissecting medical student culture and the shaping of medical professional identity in Ireland, c.1800-1950. 25 Mar 2013

This application seeks funding to visit relevant archives in London as part of a wider postdoctoral study I am undertaking on the history of Irish medical students' experiences, c.1800-1950. I will produce a public outreach blog post on the use of medical memoirs as a genre and on the importance of the Wellcome Library collections to Irish medical history. The research grant will also make a significant contribution to the outputs of the wider project which are a monograph and three peer-reviewe d journal articles. The postdoctoral study, funded by an Irish Research Council postdoctoral fellowship (2012-14) assesses how Irish medical schools inculcated students with the hallmarks of medical professional identity and whether there was anything distinctive about Irish medical students' educational experiences in the period. The fellowship does not provide funds for travel and a Wellcome Trust Research Expenses grant would enable me to undertake vital research at the British Library, W ellcome Library and Royal College of Surgeons Library, drawing upon relevant contemporary lecturers' addresses, student magazines, diaries, lecture notes, and student guides. These sources, many of which are archival in nature, are not available at Irish libraries and it is vital that they are viewed in person.

Amount: £1,455
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College Dublin

Differential analysis of the genomic and transcriptomic mechanisms governing the intracellular life of atypical pathogenic Salmonella serovars in human and murine macrophages 16 Jul 2012

The aim of this project is to characterise and compare the ability of atypicalSalmonella serovars to survive and replicate following phagocytosis by both human and mouse macrophages. Salmonellosis is a zoonotic disease of major public health concern. Salmonella infections in humans have been mainly studied in the mouse model using Salmonella Typhimurium. However, the immunological response to Salmonella Typhimurium is completely different in humans to that of mice. Despite this, monocyte and macrophage studies have traditionally been carried out in murine cell lines (J774 and RAW). The interactions between a set of atypical Salmonella serovars and both human and mouse macrophages will be assessed at the bacterial and host level throughcell infection, cytokine detection/quantification and macrophage activation assays. SMRT sequencing of a specific serovar with an unusual infection phenotype will be performed to aid in genome assembly and to determine the methylome. dRNA-seq will be used to functionally annotate the genome and RNA-seq will be used to characterise the transcriptional landscape of the selected serovar. A TraDIS library will be generated for the specific Salmonella serovar to determine the essential gene set in in vitro and ex vivoconditions to identify the genes essential to survival in macrophages.

Amount: £153,645
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College Dublin

An investigation into the regulation of virulence factors by DNA supercoiling in gastrointestinal pathogens 16 Jul 2012

DNA supercoiling is a global regulator that plays a critical role in the regulation of virulence factors in many gastrointestinal pathogens including S. Typhimurium. Studies of Campylobacter jejuni have revealed that there is a strong correlation between DNA Supercoiling and the regulation of different virulence genes. However C. jejuni displays an absence of many of the classic regulators of virulence found in S.Typhimurium including nucleoid associated proteins. It has recently been demonstrated that DNA supercoiling affects the regulation of motility and invasion of epithelial cells by C.jejuni. The overall aim of this project is to investigate the regulation of virulence factors by DNA Supercoiling in these two key gastrointestinal pathogens. Transcriptional profiles will be generated for S.Typhimurium and C.jejuni by RNA-seq in response to changes in DNA topology. Bioinformatic analysis of these transcriptional profiles will lead to the identification of potential DNA supercoiling regulons as well as aid the design of predictive models for identifying genes in other pathogens which are regulated by changes in DNA topology. Finally in vitro infection assays will be used to validate and functionally characterise novel supercoiling regulons identified in this analysis.

Amount: £153,645
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College Dublin

The evolution of riboregulation in mycobacterial pathogens and its role in host-pathogen interactions 16 Jul 2012

In the past decade, non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), including antisense RNAs (asRNAs), small intergenic RNAs (sRNAs), and elements within the untranslated regions (UTRs) of genes, have emerged as widespread and important regulators of bacterial gene expression. The genus Mycobacterium contains a number of clinically relevant lineages, including the slow-growing members of the M. tuberculosis complex (MTBC), such as M. tuberculosis and M. bovis; facultativepathogens such as M. marinum; and the rapidly growing, multidrug resistant, opportunistic pathogen M. abscessus. Although ncRNAs are known to exist in a number of mycobacteria, their roles are still largely unclear. Using comparative transcriptomic analyses and host cell infection models, thisproject seeks to further understand the prevalence, distribution and functionsof ncRNAs in mycobacteria. Key goals are: " To compare the ncRNA transcriptional patterns of an obligate intracellular pathogen (M. bovis) with those of a closely related facultative pathogen (M. marinum) using computational methods. " To understand the roles of sRNAs in the infection process via RNA-seq analysis of M. abscessus during infection of THP-1 cells. " To uncover the targets of selected sRNAs via experimental approaches. " To offer an insight into the mechanistic aspects of target recognition by searching for sRNA chaperone proteins.

Amount: £153,645
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College Dublin

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship 22 Jun 2015

Not available

Amount: £14,001
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College Dublin

CHARACTERISATION OF NOVEL FACTORS REGULATING CONE PHOTORECEPTOR DEVELOPMENT, FUNCTION AND SURVIVAL: TARGET BASED IDENTIFICATION OF NOVEL NEUROPROTECTIVE COMPOUNDS. 12 Jan 2015

My goal is to improve treatment options for devastating forms of blindness and to better understand the fundamental biology of photoreceptors. By characterising determinants of photoreceptor development, function and survival, I aim to identify novel neuroprotective compounds to treat vision loss. Cone photoreceptor neurons enable vision. My hypothesis is that cell signalling genes enriched in photoreceptors play critical functions in photoreceptor biology, and represent therapeutic targets for blindness. In this WT-NIIH studentship, I characterise the expression profile, interacting partners, function and therapeutic potential of factors enriched in cones using zebrafish, murine and induced pluripotent stem cell models.

Amount: £80,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College Dublin

Prisoners, Medical Care and Entitlement to Health in England and Ireland, 1850-2000. 27 Jan 2014

Our project investigates health risks, medical interventions and health care in English and Irish prisons between 1850 and 2000. The two systems were interconnected in terms of administrative development and the high number of Irish prisoners in English prisons, yet varied in terms of the size of their respective populations, the impact of religious bodies on reform and in the role of political prisoners in shaping health. The largest research strand explores the high incidence of mental illness amongst prisoners and the impact of the prison system on the mental health of inmates, adults and juveniles, key issues which have preoccupied prison medical services and reformers from the early nineteenth century to the current day. Further strands examine the management of medical care and disease; responses to HIV/AIDS in prisons; the impact of political prisoners on medical regimes and prisoners' rights; the health of women prisoners; and the campaigns of lay and religious reformers in see king to improve facilities. The project interrogates inherent tensions as medical staff grappled to maintain healthy and hygienic practices, while devising regimens to discipline and rehabilitate prisoners in the context of poor conditions, official disinterest and intermittent overcrowding. Our case studies also consider the categories of gender, sexuality, class, age, religion, race, migration and ethnicity and how these influenced medical interventions. Alongside the production of scholarly o utputs, and a wide range of public engagement activities, our project will address current policy debates on prison systems, medical ethics and the management of prisoners' health.

Amount: £500,022
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College Dublin