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Volunteering Matters
University of Leicester

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Results

Grant to Volunteering Matters 23 Mar 2015

The men go forth to Battle, the women wait and knit

Amount: £9,800
Funder: The National Lottery Heritage Fund
Recipient: Volunteering Matters
Region: North East
District: County Durham

Grant awarded to Community Service Volunteers (Training and Enterprise NE) (Tyne & Wear) 10 Mar 2009

To provide support and mentoring to people with mental health problems to help them volunteer in Newcastle.

Grant awarded to Community Service Volunteers (Training and Enterprise NE) (Tyne & Wear) 13 Jul 2004

To provide daycare services to older people living in high rise flats in Newcastle.

Positive Futures London 18 Nov 2015

This project, based on a established youth-led volunteering model is expanding as a result of self-referrals and is being delivered in Hackney, Haringey and Tower Hamlets. It will support young people aged 13 to 25 to deliver volunteering and social action projects which they have identified to be of benefit to the local community. The aim of project is that all of the young people who are participating in it will develop key skills and have positive experiences that will shape their personal development.

Amount: £387,576
Funder: The Big Lottery Fund
Recipient: Volunteering Matters
Region: London
District: Hackney London Boro

Resolving the molecular architecture of human DNA lesion bypass machines 06 Sep 2018

DNA replication through regions of damage is termed translesion synthesis (TLS), a mechanism conserved from bacteria to mammals and executed by the interplay of high-fidelity and error-prone DNA polymerases, that latter of which can accommodate distorted templates in their active sites. Despite its major role in the maintenance of genome stability and implication in human cancer, TLS is still poorly understood at the molecular level. In this proposal, we will set out to unravel the molecular mechanisms of TLS. We will reconstitute, in vitro, two minimal replisomes including the human high-fidelity polymerase pol delta or the TLS polymerase pol eta. For the first time, we will employ cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to determine these replisomes' structure. This work will constitute the critical building block for a far-reaching mechanistic investigation, which will combine cryo-EM and single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to resolve the architecture and choreography of the DNA lesion bypass machinery.

Amount: £95,982
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leicester

Rescue of secretion of disease-associated misfolded glycoproteins in UGGT1 knock-out cells 06 Sep 2018

UGGT1 is the checkpoint enzyme of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) glycoprotein folding quality control (ERQC) machinery. Many a devastating human disease is caused by a mutation causing a slightly misfolded, but nevertheless functional protein that is flagged for ER retention by UGGT1 and ultimately degraded. The Seed Award in Science will enable me to test the hypothesis that modulation of UGGT1 can rescue the secretion of the mutant, but functional, misfolded glycoprotein, and alleviate the pathogenic consequences of the mutation. Rescue of secretion by UGGT1 deletion was tested successfully once in a plant but never in animals or mammalian cells. To do this, I will follow fluorescently tagged misfolded glycoprotein mutants in UGGT1 CRISPR/Cas9 knockout and wild-type (WT) mammalian cells. I will also use mass spectrometry to compare UGGT1 knockout cells to WT cells, to determine what impact UGGT1 deletion has on the overall secretome. These experiments if successful will make the case for the development of ERQC small-molecule modulators and the establishment of a personalised medicine strategy for the therapy of glycoprotein misfolding congenital syndromes. Unlike mutant-specific pharmacological chaperone therapies, hitting UGGT1, the one and only ERQC checkpoint, would benefit patients suffering from a broad range of rare disease.

Amount: £99,509
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leicester

Assessing Real and Perceived Barriers to Innovative Medical Practice 10 Nov 2016

This scoping exercise is to explore perceived barriers to clinical innovation in medical practice. This important area has recently been brought into sharp focus by Lord Saatchi’s Medical Innovation Bill, as well as government initiatives such as the Innovation Pathway for NHS Products and the Early Access to Medicines Scheme. It became clear from a Department of Health consultation that no research had been conducted into what barriers to innovation exist, or are perceived to exist by health professionals. The award would support the running of five focus groups to ascertain what doctors themselves see as barriers to the use of responsible innovative practices, and how they might be removed without compromising patient safety. The findings will underpin a bid for a larger, more comprehensive international project which will fully explore in detail real and perceived barriers to innovation. Key goals include building an evidence base identifying barriers and constraints to innovation, and whether these differ between or are specific to certain specialties. We also aim to establish a network of potential participants for the larger project, as well as strengthening our ability to collaborate and work as a team using a smaller, more manageable data set.

Amount: £35,738
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leicester

Open access block grant 2016/17 30 Sep 2016

Not available

Amount: £38,204
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leicester

A new approach to the treatment of invasive pneumococcal diseases 16 Sep 2013

Streptococcus pneumoniae causes a very high number of cases of pneumonia, meningitis and bacteraemia, worldwide. Despite using antibiotics that kill the bacterium, a large number of patients still die and in meningitis, many survivors have profound neurological handicap. This is because the bacterium produces a very damaging virulence factor that is not inhibited by antibiotics. This problem constitutes an unmet medical need that Professor Peter Andrew and colleagues from the University of Leicester are proposing to fulfill. They have identified that small molecules can inhibit this virulence factor and are effective in vivo. The team have been awarded funding through the Seeding Drug Discovery initiative to identify new small molecules and through a programme of medicinal chemistry, combined with in vitro and in vivo testing, to identify lead compounds with appropriate efficacy, pharmacokinetics and toxicology. The aim is that giving such molecules will reduce the number of patients that die or suffer handicap as a result.

Amount: £196,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leicester

Mental Health Reform and the American Presidency, 1970-2000. 16 Sep 2013

This research project, which informs a new monograph I am writing for Rutgers University Press, entitled 'Voices of Health and Illness: Medicine, Psychiatry, and American Culture, 1970-2000', examines mental health care reform during five modern United States presidencies: those of Bill Clinton (1993-2000), Ronald Reagan (1981-89), Jimmy Carter (1977-81), Gerald Ford (1974-77) and Richard Nixon (1969-74). The substantial body of healthcare reform papers housed in these five presidential librari es will provide the historical spine for my monograph, which traces and analyses the development of mental health provision during the last thirty years of the twentieth century. While Presidents Carter and Clinton, and particularly the First Ladies, Rosalynn Carter and Hillary Clinton, were very serious about healthcare, I will contrast these two Democratic administrations with more piecemeal reforms during three Republican administrations, focusing on Nixon's and Ford's attempts to redress the cost of President Johnson's landmark healthcare legislation and Reagan's move away from Carter's Mental Health Systems Act of 1980. My project will assess to what extent this Act - the product of Carter's Presidential Commission on Mental Health (1977-78) - was revived by the Clinton administration in the late 1990s, when mental health care surfaced once again as a priority.

Amount: £5,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leicester

Bridging the gap between patients and carers : The case of rare disease patient-advocacy actors. 22 Apr 2013

This project investigates the relationship between advocacy action and the empowerment of patient communities. Empowerment is here understood as patients participatory action in decision-making on disease research and treatment. The study specifically focuses on rare disease patient-advocacy actors because according to the scientific literature they are among the most empowered groups in the health sector and may serve as a model for other patient groups that are still struggling to get particip atory power in policymaking and research implementation. The project will develop four lines of investigation focused on specific elements of mobilization: [LI1] processes of information sharing among patients, health care professionals, institutions and policymakers; [LI2] lobbying strategies aimed at bolstering awareness in the institutional polity; [LI3] campaigning strategies aimed at generating awareness in the general public; [LI4] fundraising strategies aimed at generating economic suppor t for the development of drugs, treatments, and services. The investigation will examine a sample of rare disease patient-advocacy groups from the E.U. and the U.S. Web Content Analysis techniques (qualitative textual analysis combined with Hyperlink Network Analysis) will be used to study processes of information sharing, while interviews with organisation representatives will provide insiders information on lobbying, campaigning, and fundraising.

Amount: £5,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leicester

Exceptional and Extraordinary: unruly bodies and minds in the medical museum . 24 Jul 2014

In medical museums, disabled people have often been the exceptions that prove the rule, presented in reductive and dehumanising ways that underpin negative ideas about what and who is deemed different, deviant, problematic. Exceptional & Extraordinary: unruly bodies and minds in the medical museum will create four emotionally impactful, provocative and high quality new artworks - comprising cabaret, live performance, film and comedy - out of a process of collaboration between critically acclaime d and high profile artists and medical historians, curators and public and media engagement specialists. The artworks will offer new ways of seeing that will be used to question and stimulate public, biomedical professional and media debate around the social, cultural and ethical implications of medicalised ways of understanding difference that pervade biomedical professional practice as well as shape broader public and societal attitudes towards disability and disabled people. This is a collaborative project initiated and led by the Research Centre for Museums and Galleries at the University of Leicester with artists Mat Fraser, Francesca Martinez, Liz Crow and David Hevey, in partnership with 8 medical museums and advice and support from SHAPE, the Hunterian Museum at the Royal College of Surgeons, and the Smithsonian Institution.

Amount: £178,990
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leicester

Twitting rare diseases on and off the "Jolie effect": A study of twitter affordances for health public debate 30 Nov 2015

This project investigates Twitter use to discuss and build knowledge around rare diseases. It explores the impact of Twitter debate – alone and in combination with mainstream media exposure – on rare disease public discourse. It builds a comparative study of microblogging around two rare conditions that have received different mainstream media exposure: BRCA mutation – the genetic condition brought to the fore by Angelina Jolie’s New York Times op-eds on her decision to undergo preventive surgery – and Lynch Syndrome. BRCA mutation and Lynch Syndrome are comparable as they are rare genetic conditions that increase cancer risk, and their impact on life quality and expectancy may be minimised with preventive surgery. This project aims to show the ways and the extent to which Twitter debate can 1) ease public reasoning on and understanding of rare and/or uncommunicable diseases; 2) facilitate interactions among publics differently engaged in health discourse and 3) intertwine with health discussion that suddenly becomes of news value in mainstream media coverage (like in the BRCA mutation case). Results from this work have the potential to develop a research strand focused on the affordance of Twitter use for patients and lay people to impact public opinion dynamics.

Amount: £4,690
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leicester

A new approach to the treatment of invasive pneumococcal diseases 16 Jul 2012

Streptococcus pneumoniae causes a very high number of cases of pneumonia, meningitis and bacteraemia, worldwide. Despite using antibiotics that kill the bacterium, a large number of patients still die and in meningitis, many survivors have profound neurological handicap. This is because the bacterium produces a very damaging virulence factor that is not inhibited by antibiotics. This problem constitutes an unmet medical need that Professor Peter Andrew and colleagues from the University of Leicester are proposing to fulfill. They have identified that small molecules can inhibit this virulence factor and are effective in vivo. The team have been awarded funding through the Seeding Drug Discovery initiative to identify new small molecules and through a programme of medicinal chemistry, combined with in vitro and in vivo testing, to identify lead compounds with appropriate efficacy, pharmacokinetics and toxicology. The aim is that giving such molecules will reduce the number of patients that die or suffer handicap as a result.

Amount: £437,952
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leicester

Harnessing the Power of the Criminal Corpse. 09 Mar 2011

This programme brings together six interdisciplinary research strands overseen by four senior scholars with proven track records that will together produce a core history of the use and power of the criminal corpse between the late seventeenth and the mid-nineteenth centuries. The criminal corpse featured prominently in popular culture, as well as science, civic life, and medico-legal productions, and its power was harnessed for the purposes of negotiating social relationships of class, the powe r of medical men and the judiciary, and in the creation of popular and scientific medicine. Such bodies were historically significant sites of overlapping, competing, and often contradictory, understandings of human anatomy, criminal justice, popular medicine, and the social geography of the body. A broad interdisciplinary study of the use, meanings and power of the criminal corpse in Britain can be used as a vehicle for methodological and substantive advances in approaches to the wider history of the body. Additional context comes from studies of the criminal corpse in the popular imagination and its role in the development of normative ethics. An ambitious list of academic and popular outputs, including books articles and an online exhibition, ensures value for money.

Amount: £945,389
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leicester

Open access award. 20 Sep 2011

Not available

Amount: £60,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leicester

Public Engagement Provision. 25 Nov 2014

Not available

Amount: £8,850
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leicester

Combat Exhaustion and Demobilization in the United States, 1941-50. 23 Mar 2007

Combat Exhaustion and Demobilisation in the United States, 1941-50 This proposed research project examines the relationship between medicine and psychiatry within the context of US involvement in World War II. The project will consider particularly the influence of new psychiatric nomenclature in terms of the treatment of illness and injury in World War II, with new terms such as 'combat exhaustion' and 'operational fatigue' replacing the 'shell shock' of World War I. My focus will be on induction procedures in the US armed forces for assessing the mental and physical health of recruits and on the rehabilitation of war casualties. My project will also examine (i) the medical-psychiatric interface by analysing clinical literature and reports written during and immediately after World War II and (ii) how combat exhaustion was represented in the cultural sphere, both in terms of training films made by the US Medical Army Department and the cycle of commercial 'demobilisation films' that were produced between 1946 and 1950. My concern is centrally with the US involvement in World War II, but I will consult British and Canadian military psychiatric texts and assess the changing psychiatric terminology with reference to World War I and the Korean War in the early 1950s.

Amount: £2,750
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leicester

Value in People award. 18 Jul 2007

Not available

Amount: £200,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leicester

What s in a name? Applying patrilineal surnames to forensics, population history and genetic epidemiology. 31 Oct 2007

By applying heritable names to themselves, our ancestors created a uniquely human system of cultural labels of coancestry that have the potential to improve the efficiency of the modern tools that dissect biological ancestry the methods of molecular genetics. We will exploit the power of the link between surnames and DNA to address three issues: We will investigate the power and pitfalls of applying surname/Y-haplotype databases to the forensic prediction of surnames from crime-scene D NA samples in no-suspect cases. Key goal: demonstration of confidence of surname prediction in forensically relevant samples. We will evaluate the use of local medieval surname lists to recruit modern donor samples that reveal hidden past population structures from Y chromosome diversity, using Viking ancestry in western Britain as a model. Key goal: estimation of Norse ancestry proportions in 'modern' and 'medieval' (surname-ascertained) samples in Cumbria and North Yorkshire. We will use surnames to ascertain groups of men who share common paternal ancestors, and then assess in these cohorts the increased efficiency of searching for shared autosomal segments, and its applicability in genetic epidemiology. Key goal: demonstration that autosomal coancestry fits genealogical predictions, and that Y haplotype similarity fits autosomal coancestry.

Amount: £251,226
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Leicester