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Volunteering Matters
University of Manchester

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Results

Grant to Volunteering Matters 23 Mar 2015

The men go forth to Battle, the women wait and knit

Amount: £9,800
Funder: The National Lottery Heritage Fund
Recipient: Volunteering Matters
Region: North East
District: County Durham

Grant awarded to Community Service Volunteers (Training and Enterprise NE) (Tyne & Wear) 10 Mar 2009

To provide support and mentoring to people with mental health problems to help them volunteer in Newcastle.

Grant awarded to Community Service Volunteers (Training and Enterprise NE) (Tyne & Wear) 13 Jul 2004

To provide daycare services to older people living in high rise flats in Newcastle.

Positive Futures London 18 Nov 2015

This project, based on a established youth-led volunteering model is expanding as a result of self-referrals and is being delivered in Hackney, Haringey and Tower Hamlets. It will support young people aged 13 to 25 to deliver volunteering and social action projects which they have identified to be of benefit to the local community. The aim of project is that all of the young people who are participating in it will develop key skills and have positive experiences that will shape their personal development.

Amount: £387,576
Funder: The Big Lottery Fund
Recipient: Volunteering Matters
Region: London
District: Hackney London Boro

Localisation and inheritance of translation factor mRNA granules in yeast. 30 Sep 2018

During the process of producing proteins from DNA, the localisation of intermediate mRNA is an essential regulation. Misregulation of protein activity due to mislocalisation of mRNA can adversely affect both developing organisms and adult tissues. Studies on mRNA localisation in yeast have served as a paradigm for other systems. Recently the Ashe lab have identified several mRNAs that associate together as a granule, and this granule is preferentially inherited by the new daughter cell during cell division. Interestingly, these mRNAs encode for proteins that are important for the translation of other mRNAs into proteins. Therefore, the purpose this mRNA granule inheritance may be to allow rapid growth and development of the new daughter cell. The aim of this project is to investigate the purpose of RNA granule inheritance by comparing the physiology of daughter cells that inherit RNA granules and those that do not. Also, the mechanisms of mRNA localisation to these daughter cells will be studied using NIP1 mRNA, which localises to these RNA granules during cell division. This project therefore aims to study mRNA localisation to investigate mechanisms and consequences of translation factor mRNA granule inheritance, processes which may also be conserved in other organisms.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Manchester

Structure-aided discovery of kinase inhibitors as targeted therapeutic agents for breast cancer 01 Oct 2017

Kinases are important targets for blocking cancer progression. However, many remain to be exploited. For example, no drugs are yet available to specifically inhibit any kinase which is switched on by a regulatory protein called calmodulin. Nonetheless, faulty expression of these “CaMK” enzymes is now thought to play a key role in breast cancer progression. The Wellcome Trust has funded the CAMSEED consortium to discover small molecule inhibitors for a CaMK protein involved in basal-like breast cancer. The three dimensional structure of this target has been solved by the Structural Genomics Consortium and Professor Stefan Knapp at the University of Oxford. Interactions with small molecules are being screened by Professor Michael Overduin’s lab at the University of Birmingham using superconducting magnets and high throughput robots at the national HWB-NMR facility. The design of improved inhibitors that can enter cells and selectively block the oncogenic state is being led by Professor Peter Fischer at the University of Nottingham, with Colin Kenyon at CSIR, Pretoria, designing deuterated analogs for enhanced activity. The result of the two year project is expected to be a set of lead molecules for development as potential therapeutic agents for breast cancer, and may yield a new approach for using nature’s own inhibitory mechanisms to block cancer-causing kinases

Amount: £1,278,444
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Manchester

Actionable Analytics Linking Patient, Practitioner and Population Primary Care 06 Dec 2017

Suboptimal primary care can have substantial impacts on population health. Concurrently, burgeoning electronic health record (EHR) data are available for analysis that can inform practitioners and patients of actions they could take to improve care. However, current information systems do not: 1) efficiently generate relevant clinical actions from population-level EHR data; and 2) optimally communicate these potential actions to clinicians and patients. This Fellowship proposes to capitalise on my PhD outputs to address these evidence gaps by: 1) developing an approach to discover potential clinical actions from EHR data using machine learning and continuous evaluation to suggest and refine them in practice; 2) developing a user interface that continually optimises the presentation of clinical actions to health professionals using existing theory and randomised "A/B" testing; 3) testing these methodologies/outputs in two different geographical settings (in the UK and Canada); 4) testing the feasibility and acceptability of communicating clinical actions directly to patients using a smartphone application. Anticipated research outputs include a generic model for generating and communicating clinical actions to practitioners/patients from population-level EHR data, and software implemented in clinical practice.

Amount: £858,035
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Manchester

Open Access Awards 2017/18 30 Sep 2018

Not available

Amount: £117,697
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Manchester

MicroRNAs buffering of transcriptional noise 30 Sep 2018

MicroRNAs are short non conding RNAs found in all animals and involved in most biological processes where they normally function as translation repressors. Virtually every mRNA is targeted by several microRNAs and individual microRNAa are predicted to target hundreds of different mRNAs. As modulators of translation they are often found to be components of complex regulatory gene networks, however a single microRNA generally has a relatively small impact on the network overall. Mutating a single microRNA does not normally have a large phenotypic effect on an organism. This observation has led to a hypothesis that microRNAs may act primarily by buffering the effect of transcriptional noise or environmental variability on transcription to normalize protein levels. In this work we aim to establish a system to allow the study of microRNA buffering through quantitative simultaneous imaging of a microRNA target and its protein product.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Manchester

Cataloguing the medical print collections at the University of Manchester Library 25 Nov 2016

This 24-month project aims to improve the accessibility of the University of Manchester historic medical printed collections by a programme of cataloguing, conservation, academic and public engagement: Key Goals To produce high quality catalogue records for priority areas of the uncatalogued medical print collections. To make the catalogue records available online via the Library’s catalogue, Copac and OCLC Worldcat To engage a range of audiences with the collections, including medical humanities researchers and the public, through targeted channels and events.

Amount: £93,886
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Manchester

Molecular mechanisms regulating spinal cord regeneration 29 Nov 2016

The transcriptome of spinal cord injuries (SCI) have been reported from different species such as mouse, rat, zebrafish and Xenopus. These experiments led to a consensus that the immune response has a negative effect on the recovery following SCI and the characterisation of "regenerative-associated genes" (RAGs). However, these experiments have yet to uncover the intrinsic mechanisms promoting spinal cord during regeneration. To uncover the genes and mechanisms upregulated during spinal cord regeneration, we will compare the transcriptome of the spinal cord three days after amputation (start of the spinal cord re-growth) in wild type and foxm1-/- knockout Xenopus tadpoles. Foxm1 is a transcription factor that we have identified as being specifically expressed in the regenerated spinal cord and is required for an efficient regeneration of the spinal cord. This is a novel approach as only a handful of transcriptomic experiments of neuronal regeneration using knock out models have been reported. This project will generate a dataset of new molecular players operating during spinal cord regeneration. This novel dataset will provide us with ample preliminary data for further funding, aimed at exploring the mechanisms of spinal cord regeneration, in particular its promotion in both amphibians and mammals.

Amount: £99,844
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Manchester

Our Health, Our Voices. Engaging underserved audiences in health research. 01 Jul 2017

"A diverse and inclusive public involvement community is essential if research is relevant to population needs and provides better health outcomes for all" (NIHR). Situated in the heart of a vibrant NHS and University research environment, a diverse patient population and communities with some of the poorest health outcomes in England, our team will deliver a 5 year programme of exceptional engagement, within the context of Greater Manchester’s devolved healthcare system. Based on our track record, knowledge and strengths, we will boldly experiment, learn from and reflect on, methods of working with people that address issues of social justice in health research. Our locally embedded long-term programme of activities will combine Research-driven, arts-led approaches focusing on particular groups and scaled up to national audiences Listening, responsive and relationship projects Support for researchers and development of young and diverse engagement talent Celebrating our communities who drive research Sharing our learning far and wide, including through income generation methods Thus generating more informed and inclusive health research, and people supported to learn, question, and enabled to actively contribute to such research. Underpinned by significant organisational changes, including the launch of new business model maintaining our not-for-profit status, a communications overhaul, income generation and more efficient processes, we will enhance our reputation as pioneers in our sector, influencing positive change in people, research and practice. Ultimately, we aim to be recognised as an innovative centre for excellence in engaged health research, and a leading practitioner in the UK working with underserved audiences.

Amount: £640,445
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Manchester

“Hands-on creativity”: The role of co-speech gestures on exploring new ideas 27 Apr 2017

People spontaneously produce gestures when they speak. They do so to enhance listener’s understanding of the conveyed message but also to facilitate intra-cognitive processes such as retrieve words, organise ideas into utterances and reduce cognitive load. The present study aims to investigate if gestures can also help the exploration and generation of new ideas during speaking. If so, is it the physical movement per se or the depictive nature of the gestural movement that helps? To this end, we will compare creativity levels of participants’ speech outputs in three conditions: gesture prohibition, gesture allowance and production of meaningless hand movements. We expect to find more creative speech outputs (e.g., more lexically diverse) when speakers gesture compared to the other conditions. Such a finding would suggest that the gestural benefit occurs due to gestures’ depictive rather than motoric nature. It would also highlight the link between gesture and creative thinking, a finding that has significant implications for teaching and learning, and psychological interventions using creative engagement to enhance well-being.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Manchester

EuroScience Open Forum (ESOF) 2016 30 Sep 2016

The EuroScience Open Forum (ESOF) 2016 is a pan European, general science conference dedicated to scientific research and innovation.

Amount: £150,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Manchester

A “Molecular Imaging (FLIM/FCS) toolbox” to investigate molecular interactions and activation in super-resolution and widefield mode 16 Jun 2016

Interactions between proteins govern the myriad processes which control cell behaviour. Determining how and where protein complexes form and elicit specific chemical and mechanical signalling events is key to our understanding of the biological processes which underlie development and disease. The ability to analyse signalling events and protein interactions within cells has been enabled by recent technological advances, and we aim to resolve protein complexes and conformations in a wide range of biological contexts. We propose to use a ‘molecular imaging toolbox’, made up of a FLIM/FCS module (coupled to an existing Leica SP8 gSTED) and the recently developed PCO-FLIM camera (interchangeable between several existing platforms e.g. spinning disk, TIRF). This will allow us to image protein interactions and conformations in cells with incredible spatial and temporal resolution and provide new capabilities for several multidisciplinary laboratories to study the molecular basis of how cells sense matrix stiffness and build tissues, and how protein complexes form to dictate cell behaviour during cell fate determination and immune function. These technologies will allow us to effect a step change in our understanding of such complex biological questions, and lead to innovative new discoveries.

Amount: £255,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Manchester

Trajectories of cancer patients in therapeutic and political contexts: A multi-sited study 23 Jul 2018

This project asks how therapeutic innovations and changes in healthcare policy have transformed the trajectories of patients with lung and breast cancer since 1988. It explores this question by combining an anthropological perspective with a historical one within a single theoretical framework. The key goals of this project are to critically rethink 1) the history of therapeutic innovations in breast and lung cancer and 2) of healthcare policies in the UK and in France since 1988, and 3) to explore, by employing the concept of patients’ trajectories, the embodied experience and the encounters with medical institutions and treatments of breast and lung cancer patients. The construction of this theoretical framework will allow me to study illness both as an individual and embodied experience and in its economic and political dimensions. Following the extended case method approach, I will conduct a multi-sited ethnography in Greater Manchester and in Île-de-France with in-depth interviews with breast and lung cancer patients, their relatives, and medical and administrative staff of healthcare institutions. The ethnography will be combined with documentary research on the history of medical innovations in the treatment of the two cancers and of healthcare policies in the two countries.

Amount: £169,655
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Manchester

The Aspergillus fumigatus gene and non-coding RNA knockout library 06 Jul 2017

The filamentous fungus, Aspergillus fumigatus is the most common mould pathogen of man. It is thought to be the causative agent in over 600k deaths annually with global incidence of allergic and chronic disease caused by this agent exceeding 4.8 and 3 million respectively. Worldwide expenditure on antifungal drugs will exceed $13.9 billion by 2018. Hospitalisation heightens the financial burden of fungal disease as antifungal agents represents only 17% of the total healthcare cost. Our understanding of the molecular factors underpinning disease and drug resistance is exceptionally limited and is guided primarily by research on non-pathogenic fungi such as the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In an attempt to address this shortfall in our knowledge, and to support the A. fumigatus research community, we have begun the process of generating a genome-wide knockout library. To date we have amassed 3872 genetically tagged knockout mutants. Here we propose to complete this resource by finalising the library to include all c 10,000 genes and non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and develop methods for their use. In addition we will update genome annotations to include details of ncRNAs and generate comparative data of the essential gene set in a different genetic background of A. fumigatus.

Amount: £771,344
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Manchester