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Volunteering Matters
University of York

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Results

Grant to Volunteering Matters 23 Mar 2015

The men go forth to Battle, the women wait and knit

Amount: £9,800
Funder: The National Lottery Heritage Fund
Recipient: Volunteering Matters
Region: North East
District: County Durham

Grant awarded to Community Service Volunteers (Training and Enterprise NE) (Tyne & Wear) 10 Mar 2009

To provide support and mentoring to people with mental health problems to help them volunteer in Newcastle.

Grant awarded to Community Service Volunteers (Training and Enterprise NE) (Tyne & Wear) 13 Jul 2004

To provide daycare services to older people living in high rise flats in Newcastle.

Positive Futures London 18 Nov 2015

This project, based on a established youth-led volunteering model is expanding as a result of self-referrals and is being delivered in Hackney, Haringey and Tower Hamlets. It will support young people aged 13 to 25 to deliver volunteering and social action projects which they have identified to be of benefit to the local community. The aim of project is that all of the young people who are participating in it will develop key skills and have positive experiences that will shape their personal development.

Amount: £387,576
Funder: The Big Lottery Fund
Recipient: Volunteering Matters
Region: London
District: Hackney London Boro

Development and maintenance of human thymic B cells in the autoimmune setting 31 May 2018

Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) is increasing in pre-school children, and the treatment the Government NHS system provides is financially unsustainable. The complex pathways concerning how B cells are involved in the development of T1D remain elusive. However, the Green Lab's recent novel findings revealing that the thymus is a principal target of autoimmunity in T1D and that thymic B cells are key in this event have re-evaluated our knowledge of the T1D process. In my research, I aim to aid in the achievement of translating these novel finding from mouse to man. By engrafting Human Pluripotent Stem Cells (HPSCs) into a specific strain of humanised mice (NSG-SGM3) which are devoid of key molecules required to develop a murine immune system (including a thymus), we hope to stimulate de novo formation of functional thymic tissue that resembles that seen in young diabetic children. NSG-SGM3 also have a NOD background, meaning their thymic stromal tissue contain genes which predispose T1D. Comparative studies looking at thymic tissue between NSG-GSM3 and NOD mice will be key in determining whether HPSCs promote thymus neo-genisis in humanised mice, as well as determining if our humanised mouse model recapitulates thymic B cell abnormalities of NOD mice.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of York

Assessing human immune organ architecture in a humanised mouse model following schistosome egg injection 31 May 2018

This research will assess human immune organ architecture in humanised mice following injection with schistosome eggs. We will generate tissue samples from the spleen, lymph node and bone marrow from naive and schistosome-immunised mice to compare and contrast the localisation of CD4 T cells, B cells, macrophages, dendritic cells and eosinophils. We do not know much about whether these cells interact together in a way that produces a string type 2 immune response, this project aims to test this in an acute model of immunity.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of York

Investigating seizure manifestation in Rett syndrome 31 May 2018

Seizures in epilepsy and other neurological disorders have a devastating effect on patients and their families. Due to their amenability for genetic manipulation, mouse models of neurological disorders where seizures represent a significant comorbidity represent an exciting opportunity to pinpoint these alterations. One such disorder is the devastating neurological disorder, Rett syndrome (RTT) that affects 1 in 10,000 females. Seizures represent one of the most debilitating symptoms observed in RTT, are frequently atypical absence seizures, lead to a worsening of other symptoms and are often refractory to treatment. Despite their high prevalence, the underlying cellular and circuit mechanisms leading to the manifestation of RTT-associated seizures remain unknown. During this award, I characterise the mechanism of spike-and-wave-type discharges (SpW), a marker of atypical absence seizures, in a mouse model of Rett syndrome. Furthermore, I will evaluate whether reducing the activity of a particular subset of interneurons is sufficient to prevent the generation of SpW activity in these mice. Together, the results from this proposal will uncover the causally important cell types responsible for seizure manifestation in RTT and identify potential new strategies for the control or prevention of these seizures.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of York

Gene modulation for protein ZO-3 and its effects on urothelial barrier formation, function and recovery. 31 May 2018

The question I propose to address is what role ZO-3 plays in urothelial barrier function and repair. I will tackle this by assessing how ZO-3 knockdown influences urothelial barrier tightness and the speed of urothelial repair. I will conduct various experiments to prove this including; CRISPR-Cas (or shRNA as contingency) gene deletion, immunoblotting (claudin3 analysis) and TER for measuring the strength of the urothelial barrier. I predict that ZO3 inhibition (knockdown) will result in a weaker barrier but an increase in recovery time. I think the loss of ZO-3 may increase recovery time as it may aid in recruiting key repair machinery involved in reforming the tight junction, therefore its loss would slow the time it takes to repair. This, in turn, may shine a light on how bladder cancer may be able to metastasize due to weak urothelial barriers, caused by mutations in ZO3 gene and become a new therapeutic target for malignant bladder cancer.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of York

The Rowntree Archives: Poverty, Philanthropy and the Birth of Social Science 18 May 2017

The project will arrange, describe, publicise and make publicly available the archives of the Rowntree Trusts and the Rowntree family for the first time. The outputs: open key 20th century archives on public health in the UK, including research about health problems caused by or related to alcohol, unemployment, housing, old age, and betting and gambling; open for research key records documenting the theory and practice of relationships between employers, philanthropy, social justice and public health; provide materials for researching the birth and early development of social science in the UK; will establish regular transfers of records from the Trusts to the Borthwick, thereby securing for public use records yet to be created. We will do this by creating fully searchable online finding aids to international standards, with authority files and access points mediated by current experts in the field, and links to related archives in York and elsewhere. The project’s success measures are: the production of publicly accessible online catalogues; the creation of research projects based on the archives; securing a sustainable future for the archives, including future archives.

Amount: £114,930
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of York

Vacation Scholarships 2017 - University of York 16 Jun 2017

Vacation Scholarships 2017 - University of York

Amount: £5,500
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of York

Institutional Strategic Support Fund 07 Sep 2016

Not available

Amount: £1,500,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of York

The alcohol industry, public health sciences and policy 26 Jan 2016

Society benefits from evidence informed public health policies. Effective and cost-effective policies are needed to ameliorate the large societal and public health burdens of alcohol. Alcohol policy making is undermined by the influence of vested interests, which results in ineffective policies lacking evidential support. This research will develop our understanding of the roles the alcohol industry plays within the UK policy making context and more broadly in influencing global research agendas, science and policy. This research encompasses study of how industry actors influence the processes of evidence production, how evidence is managed within the political strategies of industry actors, and the impacts evidence management has within the policy making process. The research will initially develop a new platform to capture publicly available data and undertake a series of systematic reviews. These will inform subsequent interview, documentary and multi-method studies investigating corporate actors, public health sciences and the science-policy interface. Ethical implications for research will be explored. A public engagement project will be developed with UK policy makers and civil society organisations. The programme will advance global research agendas on vested interests, science and policy, and inform national and international alcohol policies, contributing more broadly to effective population-level prevention strategies.

Amount: £991,008
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of York

MA Medical History and Humanities 11 Jul 2018

The MA in Medical History and Humanities is an interdisciplinary course jointly run by the Departments of History and English, which draws strength from the range of expertise located in both departments. It is open to people with backgrounds in other humanities disciplines, as well as those with social science, science and public health backgrounds with an interest in the medical humanities. The course is shaped by cutting-edge international research spanning the fields of medical history, literary study, sociology, philosophy, health sciences and policy. Students can explore historical, literary, social and cultural perspectives on illness and health, general well-being, issues of public health and the history of medicine. They also examine the links between history, the humanities and policy to gain advanced skills in analysis and critical reflection. Students take a core module which introduces key concepts, methods and debates in medical history and humanities. A strong programme of option modules are offered with students choosing from a range of topics in medical history, the humanities and beyond. Research training also provides essential grounding in graduate-level research skills: selecting research topics, large-scale project management, locating secondary and primary materials, storing and ordering findings and presentation techniques.

Amount: £80,233
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of York

The Promise of 'Wellness': Understanding Alternative Dietary Practices in Precarious Times 23 Jul 2018

From ‘green juice’ to ‘golden milk’, ‘energy balls’ to ‘spiralised squash’, ‘activated charcoal’ to ‘bullet-proof coffee’, a whole host of supposedly health-enhancing dietary practices have become popular in the UK under the auspices of ‘wellness’. While such trends generate significant media attention and are cause for concern among medical professionals, they remain poorly understood and frequently trivialised. This study will be the first to interrogate the social, economic, and political forces underwriting the rise of wellness culture in Britain and account for its distinctly gendered contours. Rather than debating what actually constitutes ‘healthy eating’, it will use the tools of social and cultural analysis to understand why scientifically unfounded dietary trends are flourishing. Ethnographic methods will explore the glamorous trappings and mundane entanglements wellness generates in women’s everyday lives, and investigate how health practitioners grapple with the proliferation of anti-expert nutritional guidance as manifest online and in clinic. The project represents an original investigation into the cultural mediation of health. Key goals include: - Understanding why women embark on alternative dietary regimes. - Situating the rise of wellness culture within the broader cultural politics of austerity. - Finding ways to enhance communication on issues of food and diet.

Amount: £183,125
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of York

Nutritional guidelines and standards: past and present perspectives. 22 Apr 2013

This one-day conference examines nutritional guidelines and standards from the early nineteenth century until the present and across place. It brings together scholars from the arts and humanities, social sciences and health sciences and representatives from various organisations that engage with nutritional guidelines, such as Oxfam. In particular, the conference will explore the construction of nutritional guidelines; consumer engagement with nutritional guidelines; and the use of nutritional guidelines as diagnostic tools. The organisers aim to bring the nine papers together as a special issue of a peer-reviewed journal.

Amount: £2,400
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of York

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship. 24 Jun 2013

Not available

Amount: £3,960
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of York

Institutional Strategic Support Fund 2011/12. 17 Oct 2011

The Wellcome Trust has awarded £1 million to continue its support of the successful interdisciplinary work of the Centre for Chronic Diseases and Disorders (C2D2) at the University of York. The Centre has supported research across a wide range of chronic diseases and disorders, including neurological and mental health disorders, chronic infections, cancers and chronic wounds. These areas have been approached from a wide spectrum of disciplinary angles - from molecular biology and biochemistry to history and sociology – and using a range of the latest technologies, including magnetic resonance imaging genomic sequencing, advanced computer simulations and low temperature plasmas. Over the next two years, C2D2 plans to build on this impressive record by continuing its support for new research, translational and public engagement projects. It will also initiate a number of new projects to support early career researchers to establish their research careers. In public engagement, the Centre will launch an innovative project in partnership with local York schools is to generate and then pilot new materials that will help to educate children about health, disease and disability.

Amount: £500,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of York

Investigating the role of oxygen tolerance in a [NiFe]-hydrogenase in bacterial competition. 31 Aug 2012

The oxygen tolerance of [NiFe]-hydrogenases is proposed to have a key role in bacterial virulence. Single site mutants of oxygen-tolerant Escherichia coli Hyd-1 will be generated and tested for key properties such as tolerance to oxidative and acidic stress using protein film electrochemistry. In addition to a Hyd-1 deletion strain of E. coli from the Keio collection, E. coli containing these variants of Hyd-1 shall be placed in competition experiments against the wild type strain to determine if those lacking, or with a mutated,Hyd-1 are at a competitive disadvantage. The competition experiments will be conducted in a chemostat in order to strictly control conditions such as pH, percentage of atmospheric hydrogen and percentage of atmospheric oxygen. Macrophage studies will be conducted on the mutant and wild type E. coli in order to determine how bacterial survival is impacted by the mutations created. Given success in these trials, the relevance of this work to human gut flora will be explored using in vivo experiments on a novel invertebrate animal model.

Amount: £150,048
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of York

Modelling pathological wound healing 25 Jun 2012

Wound healing is a complex process consisting of several overlapping stages mediated by a network of signalling molecules. Mathematical models have been extensively applied to this area of study, however theoretical investigations generally focus on a single stage of the process in isolation, and fail to incorporate the role of signalling molecules such as cytokines in mechanistic detail. Recent experimental studies have suggested that the timing of events such as cell proliferation play an important role in determining healing outcomes, but this hypothesis is yet to be studied using mathematical approaches. We aim to produce a more complete mathematical model of the overall wound healing process, using ordinary and partial differential equation approaches to describe the underlying molecular and biophysical mechanisms. Model predictions will be compared to in vivo experimental findings, making use of quantitative measures of features of the repair process (such as epithelial proliferation rates) wherever possible. The models will be refined accordinglyand used to investigate the effect of delays in the onset of cell proliferation on healing outcomes

Amount: £150,048
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of York