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Funders:
Paul Hamlyn Foundation
The Wellcome Trust
Essex Community Foundation
Award Year:
2017

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Funding Organizations (clear)
The National Lottery Community Fund (10,430) Co-operative Group (7,934) The National Lottery Heritage Fund (1,698) Community Foundation serving Tyne & Wear and Northumberland (1,531) Garfield Weston Foundation (1,493) Sport England (1,407) The Wellcome Trust (1,183) BBC Children in Need (1,044) Quartet Community Foundation (890) Heart Of England Community Foundation (612) The Henry Smith Charity (543) County Durham Community Foundation (503) The Robertson Trust (482) London Borough of Southwark (407) Masonic Charitable Foundation (398) The Tudor Trust (374) Community Foundation for Surrey (366) Wolfson Foundation (353) Essex Community Foundation (345) Lloyds Bank Foundation for England and Wales (335) Esmée Fairbairn Foundation (273) Sussex Community Foundation (272) Somerset Community Foundation (271) Suffolk Community Foundation (259) Power to Change Trust (256) The Clothworkers Foundation (233) Comic Relief (232) Corra Foundation (231) National Churches Trust (220) Paul Hamlyn Foundation (215) Woodward Charitable Trust (208) Two Ridings Community Foundation (196) Oxfordshire Community Foundation (190) Devon Community Foundation (183) City Bridge Trust (159) London Catalyst (144) Cheshire Community Foundation (131) Trust for London (129) Pears Foundation (126) Nesta (121) Barrow Cadbury Trust (102) Greater London Authority (101) Walcot Foundation (101) Youth Music (101) R S Macdonald Charitable Trust (100) John Moores Foundation (98) Cloudesley (96) Joseph Rowntree Charitable Trust (96) Sir George Martin Trust (94) The Joseph Rank Trust (89) See Less

Results

EpiChange: Quantifying longitudinal changes after epilepsy surgery 04 Dec 2017

Resective surgery for epilepsy, where the part of the brain thought to cause seizures is removed, leads to seizure freedom in around 70% of patients 1 year post-surgery. This falls to around 50% at 5 years post-surgery. It is not fully understood why surgery only works initially for some patients, and why this falls over time post-operatively. Surgery has a substantial immediate impact on brain structure, however, the long-term impact of surgery on brain dynamics is poorly understood. In order to make progress in this area we will perform a retrospective analysis of longitudinally acquired electroencephalographic (EEG) data. EEG recordings were made pre-operatively, and post-operatively in 76 patients for up to 5 years. Using univariate and multivariate data analysis, in conjunction with machine learning, we will learn how brain dynamics change after surgery, and if this change relates to outcome. Crucially, we will attempt to identify which factors in brain dynamics correlate with seizure relapse, even years after surgery. If successful, this will pave the way to a larger project where changes can be reverse engineered to give predictions of post-operative decline using pre-operative data. Long-term, this research has implications for other disorders involving longitudinal decline following structural brain damage.

Amount: £99,978
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Newcastle University

Challenging Archives: Delivering research access, public engagement and the curatorial care of the Franko B Archive 16 Nov 2017

In consultation with the artist, this project will catalogue and conserve his unique, research-rich archive and make it accessible to meet established demands for research and public dissemination. The nature of the documentation, however, presents a set of particularly complex legal, ethical and practical challenges for archival and museological practice. These challenges, reflecting FB’s work, are interdisciplinary, and run parallel to those faced by other medical and LGBT+ collections containing similarly challenging material. As part of the project we will develop guidelines/methodology for curatorial care - and research access to - such material: an advisory committee of curators, academics, lawyers and regional medical humanities network representatives will support us and a case paper will be published at the end to serve as a model for other 'challenging' archives. FB is an artist whose extraordinary body-based performances have often involved blood-letting. His work, which explores the limits of the body, touching on pain, suffering and sexuality in contemporary culture, attracts considerable multi-disciplinary research interest, from art historians, artists and curators to medical humanities historians and anthropologists researching questions of the body as a site of connection between the social, bio-medical, political and affective forces that constitute contemporary life and well-being.

Amount: £136,049
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Bristol

Cinema and Medicine in Early Soviet Russia 30 Nov 2017

Provision for Public Engagement

Amount: £22,042
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Nottingham

Crafting Qualitative Health Research for the Future 04 Dec 2017

Healthcare environments across the globe are encountering new challenges as they respond to changing populations, global austerity, rapid technological advances, personalised medicine, and demands for more patient involvement. We believe that qualitative health research (QHR) can contribute to our understanding and responses to these challenges, and we have developed a proposal which aims to expand and improve the work of this field. This proposed work will be conducted through our UCL Qualitative Health Research Network (QHRN) and will include the following activities: 1) a networking and brainstorming event to create a forum for the critical analysis and improvement of QHR; 2) the fourth QHRN symposium, a two-day event with 200 delegates, 20 oral presentations and 40 posters; and 3) our quarterly seminar series, which showcases presentations from leading scholars in QHR. The main outputs generated through these events and activities will include: A position paper detailing recommendations for the improvement of QHR, publication of our proceedings from the symposium in a peer-reviewed journal, workshops and other training opportunities at the QHRN Symposium, the continuation of communication channels for members of the network (website, email listserv, and Twitter account), and dissemination of findings of QHR to patient organisations, practitioners and policymakers.

Amount: £29,198
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Global Health 50/50: Towards accountability for gender equality in global health 04 Dec 2017

We propose to establish Global Health 50/50, a new initiative seeking to advance action and accountability for gender-equality in global health. Gender is a key driver of power to exercise the right to health, including exposure to risks of poor health, health seeking behaviours, and access to quality health care. Gender inequalities continue to define and drive career pathways and opportunities for people working in global health organizations. While some progress has been made, major gaps and challenges remain. We seek to raise awareness of persistent inequality and identify pathways to change. We will establish a network of experts in gender and global health, working with an advisory body drawn from the realms of politics, development, management, advocacy, human rights, social justice. Global Health 50/50 will publish an annual report on the state of gender-related policies and practices of 150 major organizations working in the field of global health.

Amount: £29,764
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

From 'A Penny in the Pound' to 'Free at the Point of Delivery': Cataloguing the pre- and post-1948 hospital records of Monmouthshire 16 Nov 2017

Key words: Monmouthshire hospital records; Welsh medical history; health records; Gwent Archives Gwent Archives holds an extensive and important collection of unlisted and partially catalogued (old) Monmouthshire hospital and health records. These records require cataloguing and conservation as a matter of priority to ensure long-term survival and accessibility. A view shared by a number of Wales’ leading historians who write in support of this bid, and will serve on an advisory board to oversee the development of this resource. A Research Resources Grant of £38,729 will fund a year project to: Create ISAD(g) compliant electronic catalogues Carry out cleaning and packaging of the documents. Implementation of these objectives will enable us to meet the following aims: To gain full intellectual and physical control over this important collection To professionally conserve the records To promote global accessibility to our health/ hospital catalogues To inspire interest and expertise in the medical history of Monmouthshire To promote academic research accessibility through standardisation The catalogues will be mounted on our website, the Archives Hub and incorporated into The National Archives/ Wellcome Library Hospital Records Database. A guide to our hospital and health collection and a project blog will also be produced.

Amount: £38,729
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Gwent Archives

Regulating healthcare through blockchain: Mapping the legal, ethical, technical and governance challenges 30 Nov 2017

Blockchain technologies have the potential to radically reshape many industries, including healthcare. These technologies create a distributed database across a network of computers, using cryptographic methods to verify the consistency of digital records and transactions. This could enable the secure, tamper-proof, transparent, and trustworthy management of health-related data. But some doubt whether blockchain can deliver on its promise. Others fear that it will deliver too much, providing efficiency and security without sufficient operational sensitivity to healthcare contexts. Blockchain is a form of ‘design-based’ regulation, entailing the hard-coding of regulatory norms into systems infrastructure and operation. For example, by creating a transparent and unalterable audit trail regarding data access and usage, or by building in privacy through data encryption. Hard-wiring norms (e.g. traceability and privacy) into healthcare systems might overcome shortcomings of conventional legal and ethical regulation, but is likely to face major implementation challenges. This project will identify, map, and examine the implications for utilising blockchain in healthcare. It will identify the legal ethical, technical, and governance opportunities, risks, and challenges. It will thereby begin to explore whether, and under what conditions, these technologies might be developed whilst remaining faithful to important ethical, democratic, and constitutional values.

Amount: £94,757
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Birmingham

J W Ballantyne a Hidden Collection in the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh 16 Nov 2017

The Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh Sibbald Library is requesting funding to catalogue and conserve an important collection on developmental medicine built up by J W Ballantyne, a pioneering specialist in ante-natal care. The key goal is to enable wider research access to the collection through the creation of 3,325 MARC format catalogue records (supplemented by archive catalogue entries).

A Place to Grow: Well-Being and Activism on Scottish Allotments, 1946-1970 06 Nov 2017

I will use The Papers of Victor Webb, records from SAGS and the Scottish Allotment Scheme for the Unemployed, to investigate how allotments were threatened by post-war housing developments between 1946 and 1970. I will examine how the arguments SAGS put forward during their campaigns to protect allotments have shaped the society today. I will work closely with SAGS exploring how researching the past can directly impact their campaigns and activities. SAGS deposited The Papers with ASC and have continued to add to this material. It is known that other plotholders retain records and I will work with both SAGS and the archives to further acquisitions. My work could become an exemplar for how researchers can work with small voluntary organisations and their archives. Key goals: Use The Papers of Victor Webb to research the Scottish allotments movement from 1946-1970. A paper for the University of Glasgow Medical Humanities Research Centre. A paper for the Social History Society Conference, June 2018. An article for Wellcome Open Research. Contribute to ASC, providing information for the catalogue and advising on further acquisitions. An article for the Journal of Community Archaeology and Heritage on how researchers and small voluntary organisations can work together.

Amount: £16,635
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: No Organisation

Lost&Found: engaging with narratives of ageing 30 Nov 2017

no abstract available.

Amount: £123,300
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Cataloguing the Freud Museum Archives Phase II 16 Nov 2017

The Freud Museum archive comprises an important collection of material relating to the history and development of psychoanalysis. Approximately half of the collection has been catalogued to archival standards thanks in part to previous funding from the Wellcome Trust and Arts Council England. We are now seeking to catalogue the remainder. The project goals are: To catalogue to best practice standards the remaining uncatalogued archive holdings at the Freud Museum, including original correspondence and manuscripts of Sigmund Freud, documents of Dorothy Burlingham (Anna Freud’s lifelong colleague and companion), papers from the early days of Vienna Psychoanalytic Society and British Psycho-Analytical Society, additional documents that complement the collections of Anna Freud and Sándor Ferenczi papers, and documents and photographs relating to other members of the Freud family and staff. This will result in a complete archive catalogue. To repackage archive collections in appropriate materials. To complete urgent conservation work. To make the archive catalogue available online on the Freud Museum Website and via the Archives Hub (the Jisc-funded online gateway to over 300 UK archives). To put in place updated plans and policies for archive documentation standards, care and conservation going forward.

Amount: £22,667
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Freud Museum London

Optical Characterisation of Epithelial Tissue Function and Metabolism for Early Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment Monitoring 19 Apr 2017

This project addresses new avenues for advanced diagnosis and treatment assessment of epithelial cancer. A novel polarisation-sensitive optical tomographic technique for quantitative 3D assessment of tissue function and metabolism will be devised and implemented. A clinically comprehensive set of tissue optical parameters (specifically, tissue optical absorption and scattering parameters), as markers for tissue oxygenation, melanin concertation in skin, chiral protein concentration and structural anisotropy, will be defined. The technology will be applied to characterise in terms of these parameters (i) 3D cell cultures in cancer proliferation and drug evaluation studies, (ii) ovarian cancer tissue samples, (iii) skin lesions, and (iv) tumour xenografts in radiobiology and radiotherapy studies. A relationship between the values of the optical parameters and tissue pathology, disease stage, and treatment response will be established, and quantitative clinical criteria for pathology recognition and treatment response assessment based on these values will be derived. These criteria will enable objective in-vivo early diagnosis and accurate neoplasm removal. The new technology will enable compressive in-vivo 3D lesion assessment in directly or endoscopically accessible organs, and comprehensive label-free assessment of cell-culture and small-animal models of cancer and other diseases. Key words: epithelial cancer; imaging; tissue function,metabolism, physiology; chiral protein; hypoxia; diagnosis

Amount: £374,957
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Surrey

Schwann cell-axonal communication during axonal degeneration and regrowth 25 May 2017

Myelinating and non-myelinating Schwann cells are reprogrammed after nerve injury into repair Schwann cells, specialized for maintaining survival of injured neurons and supporting axonal regeneration. This process is regulated by Schwann cell-intrinsic signals, such as the transcription factor c-Jun, however few other candidates have been identified. It is, currently, unknown how Schwann cell reprogramming is initiated, but unidentified extrinsic signals from injured axons are likely candidates. I aim to delineate the spatial and temporal regulation of Schwann cell-intrinsic downstream signals in real-time and define their role in repair Schwann cell function and axonal regeneration. Secondly, I aim to test the hypothesis that axon-derived signals initiate Schwann cell reprogramming during nerve injury. I will use cell culture, in vivo mouse models and a live and dynamic zebrafish larval model of nerve injury. This study will be the first to investigate how axon-intrinsic mechanisms of nervous system injury interplay with glial cell molecular responses to nerve damage, in real-time. Using cutting edge techniques in two species, this project will significantly advance our understanding of Schwann cell-axonal biology and tissue repair. Excitingly, this research may identify new potential therapeutic targets to improve poorly regenerating human nerves and treat patients with neuropathies.

Amount: £426,876
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

Carbonyl Reductase 1 and 20β-Dihydrocortisol: a novel glucocorticoid metabolism pathway in the pathogenesis of mineralcorticoid activation in obesity. 25 May 2017

Dysregulation of the balance of corticosteroid action via glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) contributes to inflammation, cardiovascular and metabolic disease. I have discovered a novel pathway of cortisol metabolism by the cytosolic enzyme carbonyl reductase 1 (CBR1) producing 20beta-dihydrocortisol (20beta-DHF), a weak agonist of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) but a potent mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) agonist. I have shown that CBR1/20beta-DHF is up-regulated in obesity, specifically in adipose, in humans and animals. In obese mice, CBR1 inhibition enhanced hepatic GR signalling (associated with greater glucose intolerance) but reduced renal MR signalling. I hypothesise that up-regulation of CBR1 in obesity leads to increased MR activation, contributing to hypertension and adipose dysfunction. To test this hypothesis I will generate an in vitro model with independent GR- and MR-responsive reporters and test the effects of CBR1. I will determine MR binding and downstream effects of 20beta-DHF in vivo; test the effects of global Cbr1 knockout and adipose-specific Cbr1 overexpression on MR activation in murine obesity.

Amount: £477,201
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Edinburgh

‘People like you’: contemporary figures of personalisation 01 Feb 2017

We aim to contribute to critical medical humanities by investigating an emergent culture of personalisation in the UK, associated concepts of the person and health. We expect to stimulate debate on personalised medicine by showing how it can be understood more fully in relation to other personalising practices and how features shared across this broad field are consequential for our wellbeing. Our innovative figural approach will be applied to case studies of both top-down and open-ended practices of personalisation in medicine, data science and digital culture. In collaboration with creative consultants, we will conduct practice-led research to produce additional insight into the role of participation in, and the sense made of, personalisation. Our aim is to put the ‘person’ back into personalisation, and relate such persons to the data collected from them and on their behalf. This approach will allow us to investigate individuals’ sense of self, agency and identification with others. It will allow us to consider the implications of new techniques for stratifying ‘persons’ precisely in shaping health outcomes and healthcare priorities. In sum, we will assess whether personalising practices, considered together, are influencing taken-for-granted concepts of the person with consequences for individual and collective health.

Amount: £368,906
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Warwick

Waiting Times 01 Feb 2017

This project brings together an interdisciplinary team to investigate waiting as a cultural and psychosocial concept, and an embodied and historical experience, in order to understand the temporalities of healthcare. It represents a fundamental rethinking of the relation between time and care through a critical analysis of waiting in the modern period. Working across Medical Humanities and Psychosocial Studies, we will uncover the history, cultural representation, and psychosocial organisation of delayed and impeded time, from 1860 to the present. This work will underpin focused investigations of ‘watchful waiting’ in current general practice, psychotherapy, and end of life care. We ask which models of time operate within healthcare practices and develop new models of durational temporality to conceptualise how waiting can operate as a form of careful attention, historically and in the present. Contextualising these healthcare practices within broader social organisations of time, we open up the meanings, potentialities, and difficulties of waiting in current times. Through academic publications and extensive public engagement, we will reframe debates about waiting in and for healthcare, moving beyond the urgent need to reduce waiting times in the NHS, towards a more comprehensive understanding of the relation between waiting, care, and changing experiences of time.

Amount: £674,829
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

Challenging trypanosome antigenic variation paradigms using natural systems 11 Jul 2017

Antigenic variation (AV) is a common mechanism used by pathogens to evade host immunity and ensure infection chronicity. Recently the capacity to study AV at a molecular and population-level has expanded through systems level approaches. However, there is urgent need to challenge existing paradigms by assessing temporal (early vs. chronic infection) and spatial (tissue compartment) influences on the pathogen antigen repertoire, as well as pathogen genotype and host context. Here, we will quantitate and derive models to parameterize antigen diversity and infection chronicity in African trypanosomes. These are an exemplar of AV where population-scale antigen mRNA sequencing is tractable and underlying molecular regulators of infection are identified and manipulable. Critically, we will extend the trypanosome AV paradigm beyond the limited infection model commonly used to date, i.e. Trypanosoma brucei in mice. Thus, we will (i) quantitate the contributors to AV in chronic bovine infections for the clinically-relevant pathogens T. congolense and T. vivax, relating this to conventional infections in mice (ii) determine the contribution of identified molecular regulators of AV, parasite development and tissue compartmentation, and (iii) use the derived information to build mathematical models to interpret and unify molecular and population-level understanding of AV in these clinically-relevant infections.

Amount: £2,070,288
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Edinburgh

Putting genomic surveillance at the heart of viral epidemic response. 05 Apr 2017

This proposal is to develop an end-to-end system for processing samples from viral outbreaks to generate real-time epidemiological information that is interpretable and actionable by public health bodies. Fast evolving RNA viruses (such as Ebola, MERS, SARS, influenza etc) continually accumulate changes in their genomes that can be used to reconstruct the epidemiological processes that drive the epidemic. Based around a recently developed, single-molecule portable sequencing instrument, the MinION, we will create a 'lab-in-a-suitcase' that will be deployed to remote and resource-limited locations. These will be used to sequence viral genomes from infected patients which will then be uploaded to a central database for rapid analysis. We will develop methods for a wide-range of emerging viral diseases. Novel molecular biology methods will allow us to sequence individual viruses within a patient. Bioinformatics tools will be developed simple enough for non-bioinformaticians to use, without reliance on Internet connectivity. We will develop software to integrate these data and associated epidemiological knowledge to reveal the processes of transmission, virus evolution and epidemiological linkage. Finally we will develop a web-based visualization platform where the outputs of the statistical analyses can be interrogated for epidemiological insights within days of samples being taken from patients.

Amount: £1,721,712
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Edinburgh

Putting genomic surveillance at the heart of viral epidemic response. 05 Apr 2017

This proposal is to develop an end-to-end system for processing samples from viral outbreaks to generate real-time epidemiological information that is interpretable and actionable by public health bodies. Fast evolving RNA viruses (such as Ebola, MERS, SARS, influenza etc) continually accumulate changes in their genomes that can be used to reconstruct the epidemiological processes that drive the epidemic. Based around a recently developed, single-molecule portable sequencing instrument, the MinION, we will create a 'lab-in-a-suitcase' that will be deployed to remote and resource-limited locations. These will be used to sequence viral genomes from infected patients which will then be uploaded to a central database for rapid analysis. We will develop methods for a wide-range of emerging viral diseases. Novel molecular biology methods will allow us to sequence individual viruses within a patient. Bioinformatics tools will be developed simple enough for non-bioinformaticians to use, without reliance on Internet connectivity. We will develop software to integrate these data and associated epidemiological knowledge to reveal the processes of transmission, virus evolution and epidemiological linkage. Finally we will develop a web-based visualization platform where the outputs of the statistical analyses can be interrogated for epidemiological insights within days of samples being taken from patients.

Amount: £482,639
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

Mechanics and execution of homologous recombination - biophysics to the organism 11 Jul 2017

Homologous recombination (HR) is an essential mechanism for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks and damaged replication forks and is associated with genetic disorders, cancer and aging. HR repairs DNA damage by copying the correct genetic information from an intact chromosomal template, which is critically dependent on the recombinase RAD51. To ensure its timely and accurate completion, HR is positively and negatively regulated by RAD51 co-factors and anti-recombinases. How these HR regulators function at the molecular level remains poorly understood and represents a significant challenge to the field due to the lack of mechanistic resolution afforded by conventional bulk biochemical approaches. We recently pioneered several cutting-edge biophysical approaches to interrogate the HR reaction in unprecedented detail. Importantly, we demonstrated the power of integrating data from these complementary methodologies to uncover the mechanism of action of the Rad51 paralogs in modulating RAD51 to promote HR. The aim of our proposal is to extend this paradigm to study multiple different HR regulators to gain insights into how they work individually and how they act cooperatively during HR. Deciphering how HR regulators work will provide an improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms relevant to carcinogenesis and may present unique opportunities for therapeutic intervention.

Amount: £520,002
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Masarykova Univerzita