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Recipients:
Broadfield Primary School
6th East Paddington Brownie Guide Unit
University of Cambridge
Award Year:
2018

Results

Clinical Characterisation of a Broad Spectrum of Genetic Variation in the General Population 30 Sep 2018

Inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) are severe and extreme changes in metabolism caused by mutations in a single gene. Recent large-scale human studies have shown that genes causal for IEM are associated with nutrients, or ‘metabolites’, in the blood. However, whether these associations cause disease or adverse health outcomes is unknown. In this project, I will use IEM genes identified in these studies to link genetic variation to clinical features in a large human population. To do this, I will assemble a list of IEM genes of interest that were identified in the literature and in large population datasets. I will then test for associations between the variants I find in these genes and a wide range of clinical features found in open-access population datasets. As the IEM genes used in this study have been associated with blood metabolites previously, linking variants in these genes to clinical features will shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying genes and disease in the general population. Understanding how genetic variation affects disease will help identify novel therapeutic targets and enable health professionals to better manage disease risk.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

Investigating non-canonical programmed ribosomal frameshifting in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus 30 Sep 2018

RNA viruses are under selection pressure to maintain a small genome, however they still need to produce a variety of proteins. To overcome these conflicting pressures, many viruses use non-canonical methods of translation control. One example of this is programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF), in which a percentage of ribosomes, while translating a ‘slippery sequence’ slip one or two nucleotides out of frame, consequently translating the remainder of the mRNA in a different reading frame and allowing expression of more than one protein from a single gene. This is normally stimulated by a downstream secondary RNA structure, however there are two known examples of a trans-acting viral protein being used as the stimulatory element. One example is found in the genome of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV): an Arterivirus that infects pigs, causing an estimated annual cost to the US swine industry of $664m. I will use structural techniques such as X-ray crystallography to derive information about the RNA/protein complex, and will investigate the efficiency and mechanism of this non-canonical PRF using ribosomal profiling in parallel with RNASeq. The latter will also allow me to analyse host and viral gene expression, to examine host-virus interactions in this important pathogen.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

Lineage tracing and early embryonic dynamics using mosaic somatic mutations 30 Sep 2018

Every cell in the human body descends from the fertilised egg cell, and during the journey from zygote to adult cell, many mutations are acquired. The mutations that happen early enough during embryonic development will be present in some parts of the body, but absent in others. One of the difficulties of this project is the discovery of these early embryonic mutations, as they are hard to distinguish from mutations that happened later in life, noise from experimental procedures, and mutations that were already present at fertilisation. Here, we cut out small pieces of various tissues from multiple individuals using a laser and sequence its DNA. Mutations shared between different samples from the same individual are candidate embryonic mutations. Each mosaic mutation gives us information on the development of the human body and with enough mutations, we can construct and visualise the human body as a large evolutionary tree, with the fertilised egg cell as the single root, and all the adult cells as its leaves. This can give us many new insights on the developmental relationship between different organs, how many different early embryonic cells give rise to one tissue or organ and developmental lineages of different cell types.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

The effect of nutrients on maximal fat oxidation rates in adult humans measured using indirect calorimetry. 31 May 2018

I aim to study the effects of nutrient availability and mitochondrial transport capacity on the variability of maximal fat oxidation (MFO) during exercise in healthy adults. Less than half of MFO can be predicted by variables such as gender, VO2max and body composition. There are two possible reasons for this. First, nutrient availability may have a large effect on MFO and current protocols may not adequately control for it. Second, VO2max - which combines two variables with opposite effects on MFO (oxygen uptake and fat mass) - may not be the optimal predictor. Here, I will test whether heart rates at a given power are a better predictor of MFO and whether short-term fluctuations in nutrient availability can explain some of the variability of MFO seen within the general population. Nutrient availability will be altered using a glucose meal and by glycogen depletion. I will also use nitrate supplementation to test whether MFO can be increased by induced-expression of fat oxidation enzymes. The key goals are to determine to what extent short-term changes in nutrients and the expression of fat oxidation enzymes can alter MFO and whether the resultant fat oxidation rates can be predicted using simple heart rate data.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

Regulation of Neural Stem Cells 30 Sep 2018

Of all the tissues and organs in the human body the nervous system is the most intricate and complex, consisting of more than 100 billion neurons. These neurons make precise connections with each other to form functional networks that can transmit information at amazing speed over considerable distances. Neurons are produced by neural stem cells, which renew themselves at each cell division while also giving rise to all of the diverse types of neurons in the brain. The Brand lab is interested in how the environment influences stem cell behaviour, in particular how nutrition regulates neural stem cell proliferation. Uncovering the molecular mechanisms that control whether a stem cell chooses to proliferate or remain dormant is crucial for understanding tissue regeneration under normal and pathological conditions and in response to ageing. It is critical to learn not only how stem cell proliferation is induced but also how stem cells can return to a dormant (‘quiescent’) state, as uncontrolled stem cell division can lead to cancer, including brain tumours like glioma. A thorough appreciation of the signals, both extrinsic and intrinsic, that control stem cell behaviour is necessary to understand how homeostasis is achieved and maintained in the brain.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

What is the functional significance of the interaction between Eros and OS9? 31 May 2018

Eros is a recently described endoplasmic-reticulum transmembrane protein that controls the phagocyte respiratory burst. Eros is essential for the generation of reactive oxygen species because it is necessary for protein (but not mRNA) expression of the gp91phox-p22phox heterodimer, which is almost absent in Eros-deficient mice. Consequently, Eros-/- animals succumb quickly following infection with Salmonella or Listeria. Eros is highly evolutionarily conserved and has a human orthologue C17ORF62 , which exhibits approximately 90% sequence similarity. Dr Thomas's group have preliminary data that the role of Eros is fully conserved in humans. However, the exact mechanism by which Eros controls gp91phox-p22phox abundance remains unclear. Using a yeast 2 hybrid screen Dr Thomas has shown that Eros's most significant interaction partner was OS9, an ER-resident lectin that regulates the degradation of misfolded transmembrane glycoproteins. Given that gp91phox is a transmembrane glcyoprotein, it is possible that Eros regulates gp91phox through a mechanism that involves OS9. While OS9 is highly expressed in the immune system, its role in the respiratory burst has not been studied. Using OS9 knockout mice and lentiviral over-expression systems, I will determine whether it regulates expression of gp91phox-p22phox or indeed, Eros itself.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

The role of Factor Inhibiting HIF (FIH) in T lymphocyte fate determination. 30 Sep 2018

Oxygen is essential for almost all animal life on the planet, acting as a key player in the energy production in cells. Cells are able to adapt to low oxygen environments by activating a factor named hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), which shifts the metabolism of cells away from oxygen-consuming processes while increasing alternative energy-producing pathways. In T cells, an important type of immune cell involved in the body’s defence against infections and tumours, this metabolic shift alters cell function, resulting in a more aggressive immune response. Understanding how this process is regulated may allow us to target and harness immune cells to treat a variety of diseases, such as autoimmune disease or cancer. Our group and others have shown that boosting HIF levels in T cells makes them more effective in clearing tumours and resolving viral infections. We have also studied the effect of factor inhibiting HIF 1-alpha (FIH), a protein that blocks HIF activity. Interestingly, FIH itself also appears to alter the metabolism of cells, although its effect on immune cells is currently unknown. During my PhD I will assess the role of FIH in mouse T cells, focussing on how FIH-driven metabolic changes can augment immune responses.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

Effect of antidepressants on pessimistic judgements bias interpretation in mice exposed to chronic corticosterone: a translational touchscreen-based approach. 31 May 2018

Patients with depression show affective-state dependent cognitive impairments that are related with a high risk of relapse. These patients show negative bias judgements when presented with ambiguous stimuli. A novel and highly translational touchscreen-based task for evaluating this kind of cognitive bias (CB) has been developed in our lab for use in mice. We have previously demonstrated, using this task, that optimistic bias is increased following antidepressant administration. However, additional tests are needed to demonstrate the task sensitivity in detecting depressive-like phenotypes. In the present project, mice will receive a 20-day exposure to a corticosterone solution to induce a depressive-like phenotype. Following corticosterone exposure, mice will be tested on the CB task. Mice learn to approach a positive stimulus with appetitive reward, and ignore a negatively balanced stimulus with the absence of reward. Subsequently, mice will be exposed to a series of ambiguous stimuli, which they will "judge" for positive or negative valence, as indexed through their approach behaviour. If a pessimistic bias is shown, animals will be administrated the antidepressants citalopram and bupropion in order to reverse the effect.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

Investigating the role of mechanical forces in cell exit from the Zebrafish tailbud 30 Sep 2018

During the elongation of the embryonic body, groups of stem cells within the tip of the embryo continually generate progenitor cells that later make up the spinal cord and segmented vertebrae. Interestingly, differentiation of other embryonic cell types has been shown to be influenced by mechanical forces from the environment surrounding the cells in culture. Over the course of my PhD I will investigate the influence of the native mechanical environment on the differentiation of progenitor cells in the zebrafish embryo into cell types contributing to the formation of specialised tissues. This will aid in our understanding of how mechanical properties of tissues, such as their stiffness, can influence cell differentiation. Firstly, I will characterise cell movement, cell shape, and environmental stiffness coinciding with cell state transitions in the tailbud. Secondly, I will investigate the influence of mechanical forces on differentiation and epithelial to mesenchymal transitions. Finally, I will investigate the role of YAP in regulating differentiation into spinal cord and mesodermal cell types. These studies will provide important insight into the fundamental problem of how cell fate decisions and cell movements are coupled during embryonic development.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

The role of Follistatin-like 3 (FSTL3) in the aetiology of placentally-related complications of human pregnancy 31 May 2018

Preeclampsia and fetal growth restriction (FGR) are two of the great obstetrical syndromes (1). These disorders cause short term complications for the infant and have been associated with a range of diseases in adult life, such as ischemic heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and long term neurodevelopmental disorders (2). Moreover, these complications have profound effects on maternal morbidity and mortality. Preeclampsia is one of the leading causes of maternal death globally and both preeclampsia and FGR are markers for the mother’s later risk of cardiovascular disease (3). Both preeclampsia and FGR are associated with abnormal placental function and metabolism (4). We have assembled an extremely well phenotyped cohort of more than 4500 women (the Pregnancy Outcome Prediction Study, POPS). RNA-seq (100M reads in ~250 placental samples) has identified dysregulated transcripts. Several of these encode secreted proteins that have potential as predictive biomarkers and may also function in maternal systemic circulation. The aim of this project is to assay FSTL3 in serum samples from the POPS biobank to determine whether this alone, or in combination with other already measured factors has utility for predicting preeclampsia and/or FGR.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

Investigating the effect of the Drosophila mitochondrial genome on complex phenotypes 30 Sep 2018

The mitochondrion, known as the powerhouse of the cell, contains its own genome (mtDNA). The multi-copy mtDNA works with the nuclear genome to control energy production and various cellular activities. To date, mtDNA mutations are among the most common genetically inherited diseases and the mitochondrial replacement therapy has been approved in the UK to make three-parent babies. However, our knowledge of mtDNA biology and how it can affect organismal traits is rather limited. This is largely due to a lack of powerful genetic tools to study mtDNA. A recent study in Ma's group shows that Drosophila mtDNA can undergo homologous recombination12. Further, they established a system to induce recombination at specific sites and select for different recombinant genomes. This work not only provides a definitive resolution to the existence of recombination in animal mitochondria, but opens up the possibility of developing a recombination system for functional mapping and manipulating animal mtDNA. In this project, I will isolate recombinant mitochondrial genomes to map/define mtDNA variations responsible for longevity and fertility to accelerate our understanding of how mtDNA impacts health. Meanwhile, I will identify key components of the recombination machinery to better understand how mtDNA is maintained during aging and evolution.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

Open Access Awards 2017/18 30 Sep 2018

Not available

Amount: £625,583
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

Epigenetic inheritance: the influence of variable silencing of the repeat genome. 10 Apr 2018

Evidence from epidemiological studies and experiments in animal models suggests that effects of environment and lifestyle can be transmitted across generations via non-genetic mechanisms. Such mechanisms are challenging to unravel in mouse and man. In mammals, non-genetic inheritance is best exemplified by the Agouti viable yellow (Avy) mouse where phenotypic differences in genetically identical animals are caused by insertion of a retrotransposon - an endogenous retrovirus (ERV) that provides a cryptic promoter driving ectopic expression of agouti. This ERV is variably DNA methylated in different individuals causing inter-individual variation in coat colour – a non-genetic influence on phenotype. Remarkably, a memory of parental coat colour is transmitted to subsequent generations. Variable expressivity can be modulated by in utero environmental exposures. ERVs represent ~12% of the mouse genome. Inspired by Avy, we propose a research programme, supported by preliminary data, to address the following questions: Aim 1 – To what extent do mammalian ERVs exhibit variable epigenetic silencing and what is the mechanism? Aim 2 – Is this transmitted as non-genetic memory across generations? Aim 3 – Are they sensors of environmental compromise? Aim 4 – Are there implications for phenotype? Aim 5 – Does a related phenomenon occur in humans?

Amount: £2,929,851
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

Gene Expression Heterogeneity in the Maintenance and Coordinated Differentiation of Neuromesodermal Progenitors in vivo 08 Aug 2018

Modern imaging data in biology is essentially multi-scalar in that raw image data undergoes a series of processing steps until it is at a manageable size to perform quantification and analysis. While this processing pipeline might be beneficial to one set of scientific questions, it may be inappropriate to others. Computational biologists may be interested in improving the pipeline itself, while other researchers may be interested in accessing the already processed data. Thus, a central road-block in the open sharing of large-scale imaging data is the fact that there is no one size fits all solution. This project aims to generate a web-based database that stores experimental and data descriptors together with links to the raw and processed data files. This will greatly enhance our ability to upload this data to repositories that are based placed to share the datasets in question, from the raw unprocessed data files down to feature extracted and processed data. Upon submission, the website will link to the deposited data and thereby act as an integrated platform for other researchers to access and explore the data that is available to them. Thus, researchers will be able to access our data at all levels. In built in the project is a second evaluation phase, whereby will we reach out to collaborating laboratories to assess the effectiveness of our open research platform. These will include computational biologists interested in accessing raw data files and processing pipelines, and other developmental biologists who will interact with processed datasets.

Amount: £48,563
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

Understanding the Initiation of Viral Replication & its Role in Influenza Virus Pathogenicity 31 May 2018

The development of novel strategies against influenza viruses depends on our understanding of influenza virus replication and pathogenicity. Both are directly linked to the activity of the viral RNA polymerase, which copies and transcribes the viral genome, and generate aberrant RNA products that are non-contiguous in the viral genome and strong inducers of the interferon response. Despite recent crystal structures of the RNA polymerase, we only poorly understand how it interacts with and copies the viral genome, or how it generates aberrant RNA products. This project aims to use i) structure-guided mutagenesis, ii) in vitro and in vivo activity assays, iii) cell culture-based interferon production assays, to ask if RNA polymerase residues that bind and guide the viral genome are important for the initiation of viral replication and the formation of aberrant RNA products and thereby the pathology of influenza virus infections. The project will contribute to our understanding of the mechanics of influenza virus replication and the identification of putative targets for the development of new anti-influenza virus drugs.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

Investigation into the role of RBM8A/Y14 in the development and function of megakaryocytes and platelets using a human pluripotent stem cell model of haematopoiesis 30 Sep 2018

Platelets are small blood cells, which cause blood to clot, preventing bleeding after injury. They are produced by megakaryocytes, large cells in the bone marrow. In people with low platelet counts (thrombocytopenia), life-threatening bleeding occurs spontaneously or after injury. Studying platelet and megakaryocyte development and function is important in understanding a) diseases causing thrombocytopenia, such as genetic disorders and other conditions, particularly cancer (and chemotherapy) and b) strokes and heart attacks, where platelets are excessively activated, forming clots that block vessels. Using stem cells (special cells capable of becoming any cell type) derived from adult skin or blood samples we grow & study megakaryocytes and platelets in the laboratory. We study a rare genetic disease, Thrombocytopenia with Absent Radii (TAR) syndrome, in which babies are born with very few platelets and abnormal bone formation (particularly the radius in the forearm). Our group discovered the cause of TAR, due to abnormalities in a gene called RBM8A, which helps cells control what proteins are produced; however precisely why this causes TAR is unclear. We believe our research will uncover the mechanism of this condition, helping to treat patients with TAR and improve wider understanding of how megakaryocytes & platelets develop and function.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

Modeling cell differentiation dynamics from single cell genomics data 30 Sep 2018

We aim to understand in detail the dynamics of how white blood cells (specifically T helper cells) react to infections by multiplying rapidly and at the same time adapting their cell state to fight the infection. In particular, we focus on a mouse model of malaria where T helper cells differentiate into two subtypes: Th1 and Tfh. By quantitatively profiling the T helper cell population at different time points during a malaria infection, we expect to improve our understanding of the mechanisms which are responsible for the cell proliferation and specialisation. We study the cell population by detecting RNA expression, surface markers and cell divisions at the single cell level. The RNA expression will provide clues as to genes which are driving this process, and we will test a subset of genes using CRISPR knock outs. In addition to a better knowledge of the immune system, we hope to develop new mathematical and computational methods that will be widely applicable to modeling cell proliferation and differentiation data in diverse biological contexts.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

Investigating the mechanism of influenza virus translation 30 Sep 2018

When viruses infect a cell, they need to hijack host machinery to produce their own proteins from mRNA, in a process called translation. The host cell requires several factors for translation, including proteins called eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs). EIF4F plays a central role in this process and is a complex made up of the proteins eIF4A, eIF4G, and eIF4E. Together, these proteins act along with other factors to recruit the cellular machinery required for translation to begin. Influenza can promote the translation of its own proteins whilst host protein synthesis is impaired. As viral and host mRNA are highly similar, influenza virus was thought to only use the same mechanism of translation as the host. However several findings, such as the fact that influenza can translate its proteins without eIF4E, suggest that this is not the case. My hypothesis is that influenza can employ a different mechanism of translation from the host. I will use several RNA/protein analysis approaches to identify the key components required for influenza translation, and attempt to dissect the mechanism(s) of translation used by influenza. Identifying key differences between host and viral processes is important for identifying novel therapeutic targets.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

INVESTIGATING THE ROLE OF DDX17 IN ANTIVIRAL INNATE IMMUNE SIGNALLING DURING VIRAL INFECTION AND ITS IMPACT ON VIRUS SPREAD AND REPLICATION 31 May 2018

The host DEAD box RNA helicases are master regulators of pathogen RNA and DNA sensing dependent IRF3 signalling and are crucial for host survival and infection outcome in response to a multitude of both viral and bacterial pathogens. Here we report the DEAD box RNA helicase DDX17 as a novel pathogen recognition receptor essential for IRF3 driven IFNbeta expression in response to immunostimulatory DNA and dsRNA. Our current data maps DDX17 to act independent to the canonical IRF3 signalling cascade at the level of gene transcription, independent of IRF3 phosphorylation. We hypothesise that DDX17 may regulate beta-catenin nuclear shuttling, an essential IRF3 transcriptional cofactor. We aim to investigate the impact of DDX17 on beta-catenin activation and phosphorylation status as well as subcellular localisation following stimulation of WT or KO MEFs. Furthermore, we aim to investigate the biological relevance in viral infection following vaccinia virus and herpes simplex virus type 1 infection of WT and KO MEFs through quantification of viral replication and spread as well as IRF3 pathway activation. This project will contribute to understanding the role of DDX17 in innate immunity and host-pathogen interaction with implications in the immunological understanding of viral infection. Key words: DDX17, IRF3, IFNbeta, helicase

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge