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Results

Singularity 15 May 2017

"Singularity" is an interactive allegorical story with strategic elements about human transformation during the digital era and how seemingly logical beings are affected by information, and how we can become both "good Samaritans" and "Terminators" through apparently logical conclusions. In Singularity an AI transforms constantly to adapt itself to new obstacles, which serves as an allegory to human transformation and adaptation to new conditions, and explores how decision making, morality, information and context shapes both how we think and how we behave.

Amount: £6,027
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Random Logic Interactive

WorldRePORT 15 May 2017

The Heads of International Research Organizations (HIROs) including the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, INSERM, Institut Pasteur, Medical Research Council, Wellcome Trust, amongst other organizations, developed WorldRePORT as an illustrative map and data table website to map out the landscape of funding for biomedical research investments internationally. The WorldRePORT system is intended to increase efficiency and improve research outcome through better coordination amongst HIROs members.

Amount: £79,485
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: National Institutes of Health

Development of an early intervention to support babies with Congenital Zika Syndrome and their families 15 May 2017

On February 1, 2016, Zika virus (ZIKV) was designated as a Public Health Emergency of International Concern by the WHO. ZIKV has now spread to 72 countries and territories, including in Asia, Africa and the Americas. It is now clear that congenital infection with ZIKV in the first trimester can cause microcephaly, and these cases have already been reported in 20 countries. In Brazil, there are 2975 cases of microcephaly suspected of being related to ZIKV . Congenital infection with ZIKV is also linked to other congenital abnormalities, besides microcephaly, including: neurological conditions , ophthalmic abnormalities , hearing loss and bone and joint disorders . Congenital Zika Syndrome therefore extends beyond microcephaly alone. The full spectrum of conditions is not yet known, nor is there an accurate estimate of prevalence of Congenital Zika Syndrome. Congenital Rubella and CMV infection also cause neurological sequelae, including microcephaly, and for these conditions there are approximately twice as many children born with other impairments than those born with microcephaly. , Congenital Zika Syndrome is therefore likely to be at least twice as common as microcephaly alone.

Development of an early intervention to support babies with Congenital Zika Syndrome and their families 15 May 2017

On February 1, 2016, Zika virus (ZIKV) was designated as a Public Health Emergency of International Concern by the WHO. ZIKV has now spread to 72 countries and territories, including in Asia, Africa and the Americas. It is now clear that congenital infection with ZIKV in the first trimester can cause microcephaly, and these cases have already been reported in 20 countries. In Brazil, there are 2975 cases of microcephaly suspected of being related to ZIKV . Congenital infection with ZIKV is also linked to other congenital abnormalities, besides microcephaly, including: neurological conditions , ophthalmic abnormalities , hearing loss and bone and joint disorders . Congenital Zika Syndrome therefore extends beyond microcephaly alone. The full spectrum of conditions is not yet known, nor is there an accurate estimate of prevalence of Congenital Zika Syndrome. Congenital Rubella and CMV infection also cause neurological sequelae, including microcephaly, and for these conditions there are approximately twice as many children born with other impairments than those born with microcephaly. , Congenital Zika Syndrome is therefore likely to be at least twice as common as microcephaly alone.

A cell culture model to find drugs that may be useful to treat dementia. 15 May 2017

I am an undergraduate Neuroscience Msci student studying at the University of Bristol. I am undergoing an industrial trainee year, with Alzheimer’s Research UK University College London drug discovery institute (AR-UK UCL DDI), as part of my course. The AR-UK UCL DDI is a newly established unit in UCL, with core funding from Alzheimer’s Research UK. Its goal is to discover new approaches and therapies for dementia, a core symptom of a number of important diseases ("neurodegenerative diseases" of the brain such as Alzheimer’s disease). With the increasing aging population these neurodegenerative diseases are becoming a huge individual, societal and economic problem. The AR-UK UCL DDI currently has 12 scientists and will increase to about 24, and is equipped to enable the scientific experiments and studies to be performed.My industrial trainee year with the AR-UK UCL DDI will allow me to experience neuroscience in the research setting with an opportunity to use techniques commonly used in the field. The placement will provide a very practical learning in a professional environment, challenging me both personally and academically. It will also expose me to the process of working towards developing new therapies. I will be able to develop my interpersonal skills alongside vital experience working in lab with experienced colleagues. I will take the confidence and skills built during the placement into my final year and in my future studies and career as I hope to do a PhD after my undergraduate course.Project details: Neurons are key cells of the brain. Synapses are the key points that neurons communicate to each other, and are thought to be the basis of learning and memory. In neurodegeneration the neurons and the synapses decrease in number and ability to function, leading to progressive memory loss, dementia and eventually, death. Therefore ways of protecting the neurons and synapses, and maintaining their function, could be useful therapeutic approaches. The project will involve growing neurons in a cell culture dish; it is possible to do this by obtaining the neurons from mouse brains. The neurons are able to form synapses in the culture dish, which mimic the synapses that would be naturally formed in the mouse brain. I will use these cultured neurons to develop ways of measuring the number of synapses. It will be possible to measure the number of synapses by using fluorescently tagged antibodies that bind specifically to neuronal proteins that localise to synapses, and then use microscopy to count the number of those synapses. Once I have set up this system, I will be able to add various small molecules (compounds) and drugs and identify any that are able to increase the number of the synapses. Such small molecules or drugs could be the starting point for developing new therapies for dementia.

Amount: £7,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Persistence of (humoral) immunity in children after yellow feveer vacination 15 May 2017

The main goal of the study is to assess whether the immunity elicited by yellow fever immunization in children vaccinated at 9 months of age is stable, so that loss of immune protection over time due to the immaturity of their immune system can be excluded.

Amount: £38,317
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Robert Koch Institut

Individual Patient Data (IPD) meta-analysis and prospective systematic review of ZIKV cohort studies of pregnant women. 15 May 2017

Building on existing efforts to identify, register and harmonise individual cohort studies, and to conduct: 1. A dynamic, prospective systematic review of aggregate data published from all cohort studies; and 2. An Individual Patient Data (IPD) meta-analysis of all study data sets generated by the several cohort studies and made available to WHO The IPD meta-analysis is considered the "ideal" systematic review, and the most capable of providing a definitive answer to clinical questions. It is based on the compilation of study databases with data at the level of the individual patient or participant. The possibility of reanalysing data from individual studies and, when appropriate, combining their databases for meta-analysis make the IPD analysis a source of robust evidence. However, the IPD analysis is a complex endeavour with distinctive activities, including:- Identifying new and ongoing cohort studies through electronic search and contacting experts working in the field - Establishing and maintaining a collaborative group of lead investigators of the cohort studies (ZIKV IPD Consortium) - Building consensus on what data to collect using the template protocols - Developing a formal IPD protocol - Obtaining the study databases and checking the data - Reconciling the various study databases and merging them - Analysing the merged database - Publication and dissemination of results - Setting up a Secretariat at WHO comprising of staff to manage the project

Amount: £40,976
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: World Health Organisation, Switzerland

Clinical trial of duration of immunity of the yellow fever vaccine in army recruits, participants of the study “17DD yellow fever vaccine. A double blind, randomized clinical trial of immunogenicity and safety on a dose-response study”, done in 2009 15 May 2017

PRIMARY:To evaluate duration of immunity of the 17DD yellow fever vaccine when applied in reduced doses. SECONDARY:To evaluate the individual repertoire of immunoglobulins directed to yellow fever epitopes in participants of the study "17DD yellow fever vaccine. A double blind, randomized clinical trial of immunogenicity and safety on a dose-response study", done in 2009. To evaluate the phenotypical/functional profile of cellular memory against yellow fever in individuals in against yellow fever of participants of the study "17DD yellow fever vaccine. A double blind, randomized clinical trial of immunogenicity and safety on a dose-response study", done in 2009.

Amount: £76,972
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Oswaldo Cruz Foundation

Persistence of Zika virus in body fluids of patients with Zika virus infection 15 May 2017

The purpose of this study is to assess the presence and duration of infectious Zika virus (ZIKV) and related markers (ZIKV-specific RNA, antigen, antibodies, T-cell response, and innate immunity) in blood, semen, saliva, oral fluid (saliva and crevicular fluid), urine, vaginal secretions, menstrual blood, rectal swab, tears, sweat and breast milk of infected individuals who present to clinics during acute illness and convalescence, and in comparison to their symptomatic or asymptomatic household contacts. To also relate these parameters to host immunity over time and across different body fluids, to socio-demography as well as other host and environmental factors.

Amount: £126,798
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Oswaldo Cruz Foundation

META-DAC - Managing Ethico-social and Technical issues and Administration of Data Access Committee 15 May 2017

We propose establishing a multi-agency data access committee (the META-DAC) to service several of the nation’s major cohort studies and to provide a scalable mechanism to incorporate additional cohorts in the future. From 1 May 2015, the META-DAC will manage and provide decisional oversight of access by researchers and other bona fide professionals to data and biosamples held by the initially designated studies: 1958BC, 1970BC, Millennium BC and Understanding Society and, initially as a pilot of scalability, incorporation of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA). The META-DAC will develop, implement and maintain all administrative and technical activities plus policies needed to realise an access mechanism that is fit for purpose given the complex biomedical/social data and samples in question. It will audit its own activity and provide regular feedback to funders and individual studies.

Amount: £68,888
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Newcastle University

Carnegie/Wellcome Libraries Fund 15 May 2017

Not available

Amount: £150,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Carnegie UK Trust

Vaccine hesitancy and socioeconomic status, scientific temperament and media preference 14 Nov 2016

Vaccine hesitancy and refusal are increasingly important public health issues, with decreases in vaccine confidence resulting in well-documented outbreaks of disease in recent years. Developing effective policies to target vaccine-hesitant groups relies on a detailed understanding of the drivers of vaccine heistancy. The research proposed in this grant will further our understanding of these drivers by probing the ties between individuals’ vaccination beliefs and a number of factors including: socioeconomic and demographic factors; knowledge and perceptions about science and medical research (including development of vaccines); trust in healthcare professionals and the media; and political and media preferences. This would be the first study to explicitly examine how attitudes to, beliefs in, and knowledge of science and medical research, and media preferences modulate vaccination views. This study represents an exciting opportunity to identify behaviours, beliefs, and social groups susceptible to anti-vaccination beliefs so we can advance UK vaccination policy through specific targetting of such behaviours.

Amount: £42,800
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Imperial College London

Expanding eBIC 15 May 2017

Not available

Amount: £1,050,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Diamond Light Source Ltd

Development of the International Network for Government Science Advice (INGSA) 15 May 2017

Development of the International Network for Government Science Advice (INGSA)

Amount: £200,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Auckland
Amount: £80,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Genetic Alliance UK

The interaction between RAMP2 and the Glucagon receptor. 30 Sep 2017

Glucagon (GCG) is a natural pancreatic hormone that controls carbohydrate and fat metabolism, suppresses appetite, increases energy expenditure and stimulates insulin secretion. Recently, it has been found that the glucagon receptor (GCG-R) may interact with RAMP2, a member of the family of Receptor Activity-Modifying Proteins, which are accessory transmembrane proteins that associate with Class II G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) to alter their ligand binding properties. This project aims to study the interaction of GCG-R with RAMP2, with the following goals: To prove that RAMP2 and GCG-R interact directly. To understand the effect of this interaction on the binding of GCG by GCG-R. To understand the effect of this interaction on the activation of GCG-R by GCG. To understand the role this interaction plays in the co-localisation of GCG-R and RAMP2 in the cell membrane. An understanding of the role that RAMP2 plays in modifying the function of GCG-R may assist in devising a selective agonist of GCG-R that possesses therapeutically desirable properties (e.g. appetite suppression, increase in energy expenditure) without undesirable properties (e.g. increasing hepatic glucose output).

Amount: £12,248
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Imperial College London

Provision of Seed Grants for Supporting Research in the Ebola Epidemic Region 15 May 2017

These funds will support a research-funding budget, for smaller scale researchon the ground in the epidemic zone. This would be able to cover 3-6 local projects under the guidance of Professor James Grover Whitworth. (Any proposals that are larger in scope or cost should be referred to the Trust to consideration for funding). Following the initial period, the team will ensurethat research can continue along with surveillance as the health systems are rebuilt in the region.

Transgenerational Epigenetic Inheritance - Cichlid as the New Model 05 Dec 2016

I aim to take advantage of the cichlid fish of Malawi to study the interaction between transposable elements, non-coding RNAs, epigenetics and heritability. This is in line with the overall goal of my Investigator Award. I believe this system to be superior to equivalent experiments we might conduct in mice. This is due largely to the high phenotypic diversity and low genomic diversity of these fishes. At the time of writing of my Wellcome Trust Investigator Award the cichlid model was too immature to proceed with an experimental plan. Now we have the required genomics, RNomics and epigenetics (DNA methylation) are all in place

Amount: £218,440
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge