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Funders:
Paul Hamlyn Foundation
The Clothworkers Foundation
The Wellcome Trust
Amounts:
£0 - £500

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Funding Organizations (clear)
The National Lottery Community Fund (214,189) Co-operative Group (16,503) The Wellcome Trust (16,377) Sport England (15,905) The National Lottery Heritage Fund (10,201) Lloyds Bank Foundation for England and Wales (5,254) Garfield Weston Foundation (5,071) The Henry Smith Charity (4,366) Northern Rock Foundation (4,331) Community Foundation serving Tyne & Wear and Northumberland (4,121) Esmée Fairbairn Foundation (3,555) BBC Children in Need (2,968) Woodward Charitable Trust (2,748) Quartet Community Foundation (2,683) Department for Transport (2,577) Paul Hamlyn Foundation (2,022) The Tudor Trust (1,992) Wolfson Foundation (1,817) The Robertson Trust (1,542) Heart Of England Community Foundation (1,463) Essex Community Foundation (1,403) County Durham Community Foundation (1,373) Glasgow City Council (1,365) Comic Relief (1,336) London Borough of Southwark (1,260) Community Foundation for Surrey (1,184) Greater London Authority (1,175) London Catalyst (1,174) Birmingham City Council (1,103) Somerset Community Foundation (1,086) Nesta (1,028) Oxfordshire Community Foundation (1,027) The Clothworkers Foundation (1,024) City Bridge Trust (1,018) Guy's and St Thomas' Charity (995) Corra Foundation (900) Masonic Charitable Foundation (895) Power to Change Trust (870) Ministry of Justice (774) National Churches Trust (760) Trafford Housing Trust Social Investment (735) Walcot Foundation (641) The Dulverton Trust (628) Suffolk Community Foundation (620) A B Charitable Trust (593) Scottish Council For Voluntary Organisations (592) Barrow Cadbury Trust (591) Devon Community Foundation (537) Manchester City Council (533) Two Ridings Community Foundation (510) See Less

Results

Amount: £1,480
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Glasgow
Amount: £1,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Sheffield
Amount: £1,500
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford
Amount: £1,323
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Imperial College London

Microfluidic Platform for Investigating the Kinetics of Extracellular Vesicle Induced Metastatic Niche Formation 21 May 2018

Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are believed to be important messengers in the progression of metastatic cancer that prime distant organs for tumour cell colonisation. However, due to an inadequacy of relevant tools, we have a poor understanding of how EVs distribute to, diffuse into and remodel organs into metastatic niches. The goal of this project is to develop novel microfluidic platforms for performing real-time continuous quantification of EV kinetics over multiple days in physiologically-relevant microenvironments. Towards this end, I propose three aims: Develop Microfluidic Metastatic Niche Platforms to explore the interaction of extracellular vesicles with liver tissue and vasculature. Investigate the kinetics of EV distribution, uptake and diffusion in liver and vasculature compartments of Microfluidic Metastatic Niche Platforms. Explore the influence of EV kinetics (distribution, uptake and diffusion) on the ability of cancer cells to attach, invade and proliferate in Microfluidic Metastatic Niche Platforms. The results of this project will enhance our understanding of metastatic cancer progression and will contribute valuable data for numerous follow-up studies aiming to inhibit or even prevent the development of metastatic niches.

Amount: £99,951
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Imperial College London

Mechanisms and pharmacodynamics of antifungal agents for cryptococcal meningitis. 30 Sep 2018

Cryptococcal meningitis (CM) is an infection of the brain and surrounding tissues (the meninges). It is caused by a yeast called Cryptococcus and is responsible for approximately 180,000 deaths annually (26). The most effective drug is amphotericin B (AmB) which needs to be given for 2 weeks and causes dangerous side-effects. A modified formulation, liposomal amphotericin B (LAmB), may be easier to administer to patients because it can be given as a single dose, and appears to be as effective as 2-weeks of conventional AmB (12, 15, 23). This observation raises a number of questions: 1) What is the optimal dosing strategy for LAmB? I will measure drug levels and describe their relationship with reduction in Cryptococcus levels. 2) How does one dose of LAmB exert a prolonged effect? i will image the movement of LAmB in mouse brains and meninges to assess how long LAmB stays in these regions. During treatment for CM, the rate of decline of yeast in spinal fluid is highly variable (24, 25, 27). Therefore, another question is: 3) Do different groups of yeast vary in teir response to treatment? I will collect samples of Cryptococcus and characterise their survival ability in various conditions.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Liverpool

Clinical Characterisation of a Broad Spectrum of Genetic Variation in the General Population 30 Sep 2018

Inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) are severe and extreme changes in metabolism caused by mutations in a single gene. Recent large-scale human studies have shown that genes causal for IEM are associated with nutrients, or ‘metabolites’, in the blood. However, whether these associations cause disease or adverse health outcomes is unknown. In this project, I will use IEM genes identified in these studies to link genetic variation to clinical features in a large human population. To do this, I will assemble a list of IEM genes of interest that were identified in the literature and in large population datasets. I will then test for associations between the variants I find in these genes and a wide range of clinical features found in open-access population datasets. As the IEM genes used in this study have been associated with blood metabolites previously, linking variants in these genes to clinical features will shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying genes and disease in the general population. Understanding how genetic variation affects disease will help identify novel therapeutic targets and enable health professionals to better manage disease risk.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge