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Results

Modernising Medical Microbiology: Establishing how new technologies can be optimally integrated into microbiology. 16 Sep 2008

This proposal should lead to a comprehensive web-based tool managed by the HPA which microbiologists in NHS Trusts could use to harness genomics in optimising management of local infection control and halting transmission of major pathogens. It will also provide a data/sample repository which national researchers could exploit, in conjunction with those at the cutting edge of bioinformatics, to elucidate host pathogen interactions and thus identify future targets for medical or strategic interventions. The programme of work will produce more complete descriptions of routes of pathogen transmission, which will lead to improvements in current guidelines for infection control. In terms of leadership and training, the Consortium will mature a group of young researchers excited about the genomic revolution, who have seen the techniques applied successfully and are now ready and want to go and do it themselves. These individuals will be key future leaders in microbiology and infectious diseases.

Amount: £2,829,138
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Microtubule organisation and role of LL5-beta in lymphoid stromal fibroblasts 27 Apr 2017

The lymph node is a meeting point for lymphocytes with antigen-presenting cells, and rapidly expands during immune responses. Lymph node structure is highly compartmentalised, and the complex internal architecture is maintained during lymph node expansion. Therefore, mechanisms must exist to balance lymph node integrity with the need to remodel very rapidly. Fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs) are the most abundant lymphoid stromal cell population, and span the full volume of the tissue. They provide structural support and are highly contractile. FRCs ensheathes bundles of extracellular matrix, termed the conduit, which filters draining lymph. The Acton lab works to understand how lymph nodes are remodeled during expansion and has shown that interaction between FRCs and dendritic cells change FRC behaviour. This project asks how the microtubule networks within FRCs are reorganised as the FRC network expands. Phosphoproteomic screening has revealed that LL5-beta, a protein targetting microtubules to adhesion sites is regulated by interactions between FRCs and dendritic cells. This may provide a mechanism by which FRCs uncouple from underlying matrix, and target secretion of proteases or new matrix to the expanding network. This project will investigate whether LL5-beta coordinates organization of microtubules in FRCs and whether dendritic cell contact changes LL5-beta activity.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Vacation Scholarships 2008. 27 May 2008

Not available

Amount: £21,600
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Value in People Award. 17 Oct 2007

Not available

Amount: £350,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Value in People Award. 17 Oct 2007

Not available

Amount: £350,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Change detection in human auditory cortex. 07 Oct 2010

The project consists of a series of brain imaging (MEG and fMRI) and psychophysics experiments based on a new paradigm designed to reveal the factors that determine listeners sensitivity to changes in an unfolding acoustic scene. Our stimuli contain unpredictable step-changes ( temporal edges ) in the pattern of fluctuation representative of a wide range of acoustic changes. By carefully manipulating stimulus statistics preceding and following the temporal edge and recording brain and behavio ural responses, we probe the cortical networks that underlie the detection of these events. Our findings to date have already provided important new insights about change processing in the human brain, previously unobserved with classical paradigms such as the mismatch negativity (MMN). Proposed experiments (1 fMRI, 6 MEG, and 2 psychophysics) are designed to broaden our understanding of the stimulus attributes and contextual factors that underlie change detection and sketch-out the processes involved: What acoustic factors does auditory cortex monitor to detect change? Which neural systems underlie change detection and what computations do they implement? How are they affected by the perceptual state of the listener (focus of attention and decision bias)? How is low-level change detection in auditory cortex used by listeners when making decisions about sound events?

Amount: £137,436
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

The London Pain Consortium. 07 Nov 2007

Chronic pain is prevalent and its clinical treatment remains limited. The London Pain Consortium (LPC) will advance knowledge of chronic pain mechanisms through internationally competitive research and provide multidisciplinary training of clinical and biomedical scientists to promote careers in neurobiology in general and pain studies in particular. In man and animals, we will: 1) identify molecular and genetic influences on pain processes; 2) study the integrative functions of these influenc es and their translation as therapeutic targets; 3) provide research and training resources for the wider scientific community.

Amount: £1,522,432
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Student Elective Prize for Ms Maria-Charlotte Campbell 29 Aug 2008

Management and rehabilitation of patients with socially incompatible personality disorders at Broadmoor Hospital. Secondly an audit into the outcomes of people bought into the emergency department by police who are under the influence of methamphetamine and have suicidal ideation, at St Vincents Hospital in Sydney.

Amount: £1,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Student Elective Prize for Ms Kathryn E Newell 29 Aug 2008

Do adverse social factors in a resource poor environment impact on the aetiology, identification and treatment of multi-drug resistant (MDR) in a Tibetan refugee population?

Amount: £1,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Student Elective Prize for Ms Victoria Nowak 29 Aug 2008

The role of metallothionein (MT) in regeneration in the rat olfactory nerve.

Amount: £1,600
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Student Elective Prize for Ms Anushka Patel 29 Aug 2008

The impact of Depression on Hbalc in the Elderly Aboriginal and Non-Indigenous Diabetic Population of Western Australia

Amount: £1,500
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Student Elective Prize for Ms Vivienne N Hannon 29 Aug 2008

A comparison of the management of a chosen disease between the Hospital of Tropical Diseases in Ho Chi Minh City, a centre of excellence for tropical medicine, and the Hospital of Tropical Disease, London including a literature review to identify unresolved management issues of the chosen tropical disease followed by a design of a theoretical clinical trial to be undertaken to clarify these unresolved issues of management.

Amount: £1,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Student Elective Prize for Ms Nirupa Desai 29 Aug 2008

Counting and staging of Plasmodium falciparum in blood films from severe malaria

Amount: £1,600
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Strategic Award for the Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics. 31 Dec 2007

The Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics was established in 1994 to undertake research into the genetic basis of common diseases. The scientific objective of the Centre is to gain insight into mechanisms controlling genetic susceptibility to human disease including the localization and identification of disease genes, functional characterization of gene variants responsible for susceptibility, understanding how gene variants contribute to risk of disease in the population and how genetic fa ctors contribute biologically to a disease process, and the development and application of new analytical tools. In order to achieve this objective the Centre has brought together multidisciplinary research groups collaborating on human and rodent genetics, genetic epidemiology and statistical genetics, functional analysis of disease genes, cell and developmental biology and structural biology. The Centre has a strong focus of expertise, equipment and resources centralized in Core groups allow ing all research groups to benefit and expand their research strategies. This grant follows the recent appointment of Professor Peter Donnelly as Centre Director and recent discussions with the Wellcome Trust on three high priority investment areas in the Centre: 1) additional computing infrastructure, 2) a Solexa sequencing machine, 3) part-funding of additional office space.

Amount: £2,020,414
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Student Elective Prize for Ms Meha J Bhayani 29 Aug 2008

A clinical research project to investigate the cardiac reviews and outcomes of patients with hereditary neuromuscular disease.

Amount: £1,300
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Student Elective Prize for Ms Katherine Talbot 29 Aug 2008

Are increases in intracranial pressure at high altitude correlated with acute mountain sickness?

Amount: £1,600
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Developing research capacity and leadership in East Africa from the KEMRI- Wellcome Trust Research Programme, Kenyq. 18 Feb 2008

This proposal aims to develop health-related research capacity and research leadership in East Africa out of the longstanding Wellcome Trust-funded major overseas programme in Kenya. Its central aim is to enable the KEMRI Wellcome Trust Research Programme to produce a cadre of researchers from Kenya and the East African region who are internationally competitive in developing and leading sustainable research programmes throughout the region. The key goals are (1) To provide a coherent car eer development track for health researchers in East Africa. (2) To specifically target key areas of health related research that need particular strengthening in East Africa: translational research, social science research, and clinical trials (3) To build regional research capacity through developing networks with universities and research centres within the region

Amount: £798,336
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Student Elective Prize for Mr Edmund Naylor 29 Aug 2008

An evaluation of the effectiveness of home-based treatment of Multi-Drug Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa.

Amount: £1,588
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Student Elective Prize for Mr Adam Handel 29 Aug 2008

Magnetoencephalographic (MEG) study of facial pain

Amount: £1,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

No time for panic: British responses to influenza in peace and war, 1889-1919 29 Aug 2008

The 1918 influenza pandemic represents the worst outbreak of infectious disease in Britain in modern times. Although the virus swept the world in three waves between March 1918 and April 1919, in Britain the majority of the estimated 228,000 fatalities occurred in the autumn of 1918. In London alone deaths at the peak of the epidemic were 55.5 per 1,000- the highest since the 1849 cholera epidemic. Yet in the capital as in other great cities and towns throughout Britain, there was none of the panic that had accompanied earlier 19th century outbreaks of infectious disease at the heart of urban populations. Instead, the British response to the 'Spanish Lady' as the pandemic strain of flu was familiarly known was remarkably sanguine. As The Times commented at the height of the pandemic: 'Never since the Black Death has such a plague swept over the face of the world, [and] never, perhaps, has a plague been more stoically accepted.' The apparent absence of marked social responses to the 1918 influenza is a phenomenon much remarked on in the literature of the pandemic, as is the apparent paradox that despite the widespread morbidity and high mortality the pandemic had little apparent impact on public institutions and left few traces in public memory. However, to date no one has explored the deeper cultural 'narratives' that informed and conditioned these responses. Was Britain really a more stoical and robust nation in 1918, or was the absence of medical and other social responses a reflection of the particular social and political conditions that prevailed in Britain during the First World War and then medical nosologies and cultural perceptions of influenza? And if the 1918 pandemic was 'overshadowed,' as one writer puts it, by the war and the peace that followed the Armistice, what explains the similarly muted response to the Russian flu pandemic of the early 1890's, a disease outbreak that coincided with a long period of peace and stability in Britain? In this project I aim to show that, contrary to previous studies, both the 1918 and the 1889-92 Russian flu pandemic were the objects of much deeper public concern and anxiety than has previously been acknowledged and that the morbidity of prominent members of British society, coupled with the high mortality, occasioned widespread 'dread' and in some cases alarm. However, in 1918 at least, government departments and public institutions actively suppressed these concerns for the sake of the war effort and the maintenance of national morale.

Amount: £657
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London