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University of Oxford (1,640) University of Cambridge (1,317) University College London (1,196) Imperial College London (766) University of Edinburgh (738) King's College London (548) University of Manchester (451) University of Bristol (429) London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (424) University of Glasgow (357) University of Dundee (325) Newcastle University (307) University of Liverpool (303) University of Birmingham (301) Cardiff University (260) University of Leeds (238) Queen Mary University of London (200) Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (195) University of Warwick (194) University of Sheffield (179) University of York (178) University of Nottingham (177) University of Exeter (175) University of Leicester (152) University of Southampton (125) University of Aberdeen (111) University College Dublin (105) Birkbeck University of London (104) Institute of Cancer Research (104) University of Sussex (101) Medical Research Council (96) Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (95) Queen's University Belfast (94) St George's University of London (90) University of St Andrews (83) University of Durham (77) University of Strathclyde (71) Royal Veterinary College (68) Kemri-Wellcome Trust Research Programme (66) Trinity College Dublin (63) University of Cape Town (60) National University of Ireland Galway (58) Oxford Brookes University (58) European Bioinformatics Institute (57) University of Bath (56) University of East Anglia (51) University of Kent (49) Keele University (48) The Francis Crick Institute (44) London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) (38) See Less

Results

The retention of memory and creation of knowledge 11 Jul 2017

<p>Memories are often formed automatically, selectively retained and then some information becomes incorporated into the networks of knowledge that each of us possess. A key challenge is to identify the neural mechanisms responsible for the selective retention of recent hippocampal-dependent memory traces and those mediating the incorporation of this information into existing knowledge networks in the neocortex. <em>Phase 1</em> concerns selectivity: Guided by predictions of the synaptic-tagging-and-capture hypothesis of protein synthesis-dependent memory consolidation, we would use a novel everyday-memory task to follow up our observations that certain parameters of learning, including peri-event novelty, enhance memory retention. Experiments using genetically modified animals that involve neurotransmitter imaging and endoscopic Ca2+ imaging would explore the potentially critical role of a neural circuit from the locus coeruleus to the hippocampus in selective retention.&nbsp; <em>Phase 2</em> addresses knowledge assimilation: This work would be conducted in the context of the new schema theory of semantic-like memory that presupposes that prior knowledge guides memory updating. It would follow up our original experiments on schema learning, introduce a new method for doing such experiments, explore endoscopic imaging in both hippocampus and neocortex, and the network contributions of distinct neocortical regions using a disconnection approach.&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £1,660,214
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Edinburgh

Human retroviral latency: regulation and dynamics at the single-cell level 11 Jul 2017

<p>Latent persistence of retroviruses, including HIV-1 and the human leukaemia virus HTLV-1, remains a major barrier to their eradication from the host. HTLV-1 appears to be latent in circulating lymphocytes, but the strong, persistently activated immune response indicates that the virus is not latent in vivo. We infer that HTLV-1 undergoes intermittent bursts of gene expression. We have now obtained direct evidence of HTLV-1 gene bursts in naturally-infected cells in vitro. The central question &ldquo;What regulates HTLV-1 latency?&rdquo; therefore becomes &ldquo;What regulates the gene expression bursts of HTLV-1?&rdquo; We have developed a powerful set of materials and techniques to identify the causes and quantify the kinetics of this gene bursting at the single-cell level.</p> <p>A major regulator of mammalian gene expression is the key chromatin architectural protein CTCF. We recently discovered that the HTLV-1 provirus binds CTCF and alters the higher-order structure of host chromatin. In this programme we will investigate the consequences for both the virus and the host cell of this remarkable experiment of nature.</p> <p>The results of this work will answer fundamental questions on the persistence and pathogenesis of HTLV-1, and contribute to the growing understanding of mammalian gene bursting.</p>

Amount: £1,927,877
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Imperial College London

SEVERE CORNEAL INFECTIONS: PREVENTION, DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT 11 Jul 2017

<p><strong>Context: </strong></p> <p>Blinding corneal infections (Microbial keratitis, MK), caused by bacteria or fungi, are a major ophthalmic public health problem in low and middle-income countries. There are multiple critical issues: delayed presentation, traditional eye medicine use, limited health-worker training, limited availability and efficacy of anti-fungals, diagnostic uncertainty. Eyes are lost through progressive corneal ulceration and perforation, mediated by human and pathogen-derived proteases.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Proposed Research:</strong></p> <ol> <li>Randomised controlled trial (RCT) of topical chlorhexidine 0.2% vs. topical natamycin 5% for fungal keratitis. Pilot trials of chlorhexidine, a cheap and readily available antiseptic, suggest it might be at least as effective as natamycin (current standard).</li> <li>RCT of topical ilomastat 0.08% vs. placebo, to reduce corneal perforation from MK. Ilomastat, a potent matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, reduced severe ulceration in animal models and earlier human clinical trials. Full-scale treatment trials are needed for translation into practice.</li> <li>Cluster RCT of early intervention package (topical chlorhexidine, smartphone-assisted diagnosis, treatment, referral support) vs. standard practices, to reduce blindness from MK through reducing delay between infection onset and initiating intensive treatment, with an agent covering fungi and bacteria.</li> <li>Evaluation of diagnostic approaches for identifying causative organism in MK (clinical, automated image-analysis, confocal microsopy, PCR) and testing potential isothermal point-of-care tests.</li> </ol>

Amount: £3,117,091
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: London School of Hygiene & Tropical M...

Connecting causes and immune consequences of infection-induced metabolic change 11 Jul 2017

<p>This research proposal focuses on metabolic changes driven by the immune response to bacterial infection in the model system Drosophila melanogaster. We will use in vivo genetic manipulations, experimental and computational analysis of gene expression, and experimental metabolomics to address two overarching biological questions. First, how does immune activation drive metabolic change? Second, how do these metabolic changes aid or impede the realised immune response and host survival?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The proposal contains three aims directed at these questions. In the first aim, we use whole-animal metabolomics to identify metabolite level changes driven by different infections. In the second aim, we identify signals and transcriptional regulators responsible for the concerted regulation of metabolic enzymes during infection, and connect these signals and regulators with their downstream immunometabolic consequences. In the third aim, we target specific metabolites for analysis, using in vivo genetics to determine which immune-driven metabolic changes have important effects on realised immunity and tolerance of infection.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Key goals: we will</p> <p>&bull; identify the metabolite changes resulting from different bacterial infections</p> <p>&bull; establish how these changes are driven by innate immune detection and signalling</p> <p>&bull; connect specific metabolite changes with their effects on infection tolerance and immune function <em>in vivo</em>.&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £1,103,343
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Imperial College London

Fundamental mechanisms controlling human energy homeostasis 11 Jul 2017

<p>Obesity and associated diseases such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and some cancers represent a significant health burden. My overall aim is to identify new therapeutic strategies for severe obesity. Using extensive genetic and clinical data on unique cohorts of individuals at both extremes of the weight distribution (severe obesity and thinness), we will comprehensively map the molecular networks that maintain energy homeostasis and their disruption in disorders of weight regulation. Building on our previous work, we will focus on dissecting cellular mechanisms that converge on leptin-melanocortin signalling using human stem-cell derived hypothalamic neurons. In human studies, we will characterise the effects of specific pathways on eating behaviour, energy expenditure and substrate utilisation. By uncovering the fundamental mechanisms that control human energy homeostasis, our goal is to identify and validate control points that can be targeted to improve outcomes in obesity associated diseases.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £3,582,289
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

Fundamental mechanisms controlling human energy homeostasis 11 Jul 2017

<p>Obesity and associated diseases such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and some cancers represent a significant health burden. My overall aim is to identify new therapeutic strategies for severe obesity. Using extensive genetic and clinical data on unique cohorts of individuals at both extremes of the weight distribution (severe obesity and thinness), we will comprehensively map the molecular networks that maintain energy homeostasis and their disruption in disorders of weight regulation. Building on our previous work, we will focus on dissecting cellular mechanisms that converge on leptin-melanocortin signalling using human stem-cell derived hypothalamic neurons. In human studies, we will characterise the effects of specific pathways on eating behaviour, energy expenditure and substrate utilisation. By uncovering the fundamental mechanisms that control human energy homeostasis, our goal is to identify and validate control points that can be targeted to improve outcomes in obesity associated diseases.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £50,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

Fertility Fest 30 Apr 2017

<p>Fertility Fest &ndash; the world&rsquo;s first arts festival dedicated to the science of making babies.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Piloted in 2016, we want to deliver two more festivals creating a high profile platform of inspirational and provocative performances, exhibitions, discussion and debate related to fertility, infertility and assisted reproduction.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The festivals will involve over 100 leading artists and fertility experts and will explore a wide spectrum of individual and societal issues including the impact of conceiving (or not) through an imperfect science; our responsibilities to the children born as a result; and how far we should go in pursuit of parenthood as the science develops.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The festival is aimed at the wider public but key audiences include patients; fertility professionals; and young people who urgently need better fertility education.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>By 2020 we hope to achieve:</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>* A high profile national discourse on fertility, infertility and assisted conception so that patients and the public have the opportunity to explore, debate and shape this science</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>* Improved support and solidarity for patients of assisted conception so they feel less isolated and greater understanding of the emotional and ethical issues related to treatment with the aim of this leading to improvements in patient care and outcomes.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £100,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Fertility Fest CIC

Understanding mechanisms that drive pain perception in early human development 11 Jul 2017

<p>Pain in infancy has negative long-term consequences and its prevention is a clinical priority, but adequate treatment requires mechanistic understanding of the structural and functional development of human nociceptive circuitry. Recent scientific and technological advances provide insights into how noxious information is transmitted to the infant brain, providing a platform to ask how intrinsic brain network connectivity and the environment affect noxious-evoked brain activity, behaviour and ultimately pain perception in the developing infant nervous system.&nbsp;<strong>The fellowship goal is to understand the mechanisms that drive and modulate&nbsp;pain perception in early human development.</strong> I will ask whether inherent differences in how the brain behaves at rest influence&nbsp;variability in noxious-evoked activity, and will determine how this relationship is altered by environmental factors and pathology. I will establish how the development of structural and functional network connectivity alters noxious-evoked brain activity, and influences the dynamic relationship between brain activity and behaviour. I will translate this mechanistic understanding into clinical practice by conducting a clinical trial of an analgesic (fentanyl) during a minor surgical procedure, and will establish whether our newly-developed measures of noxious-evoked brain activity are suitable for use in infant analgesic dose-finding studies.</p>

Amount: £1,953,181
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Understanding mechanisms that drive pain perception in early human development 11 Jul 2017

<p>Pain in infancy has negative long-term consequences and its prevention is a clinical priority, but adequate treatment requires mechanistic understanding of the structural and functional development of human nociceptive circuitry. Recent scientific and technological advances provide insights into how noxious information is transmitted to the infant brain, providing a platform to ask how intrinsic brain network connectivity and the environment affect noxious-evoked brain activity, behaviour and ultimately pain perception in the developing infant nervous system.&nbsp;<strong>The fellowship goal is to understand the mechanisms that drive and modulate&nbsp;pain perception in early human development.</strong> I will ask whether inherent differences in how the brain behaves at rest influence&nbsp;variability in noxious-evoked activity, and will determine how this relationship is altered by environmental factors and pathology. I will establish how the development of structural and functional network connectivity alters noxious-evoked brain activity, and influences the dynamic relationship between brain activity and behaviour. I will translate this mechanistic understanding into clinical practice by conducting a clinical trial of an analgesic (fentanyl) during a minor surgical procedure, and will establish whether our newly-developed measures of noxious-evoked brain activity are suitable for use in infant analgesic dose-finding studies.</p>

Amount: £60,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Structural cell biology of transport vesicle and organelle biogenesis 11 Jul 2017

<p>Integral membrane protein cargo are constantly moved in coated tubular/vesicluar carriers between the cell's organelles and its limiting membrane in order to maintain membrane identity and function. That these transport processes are of fundamental importance is reflected by the fact that ~30% of mammalian proteins are either components of the vesicle/tubule transport machinery or are its cargo.&nbsp; Coated vesicular/tubular carrier formation including cargo selection requires the interplay of a network of peripheral membrane proteins and membrane components including phospholipids, small GTPases, docking proteins and the cargo itself. The coat must also prepare and facilitate the carrier for fusion with its target. AP2, AP3, COPI and retromer/VARP based coats along with their accessory/regulatory factors are vital for producing a fully functional endosomal system. We will use a combination of X-ray crystallography, NMR and the fast developing techniques of single particle cryoEM and cryo electron tomography allied with biochemical/biophysical studies to formulate theories concerning the architecture, assembly routes and control/regulation of the formation of these four key tubular/vesicular transport carriers. Specific function abolishing mutations designed on the basis of these studies will allow us to test and further explore our theories in cells using a&nbsp; wide range of in vivo techniques.</p>

Amount: £3,445,099
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Cambridge

Out on the Pitch: Sexuality and Mental Health in Men's and Women's Sport, 1970-Present 24 May 2017

<p>Why have more women athletes come out than men?&nbsp; What role has sport played in facilitating or preventing LGBT athletes from coming out and what effect has this had (both positive and negative) on mental health?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&lsquo;<strong>Out on the Pitch</strong>&rsquo; is a scoping project for a future Wellcome Trust Collaborative Award application focussing on&nbsp;Sport and Mental Health, and involving Matthew Smith, Mark Doidge and Ali Haggett. &nbsp;This future bid will be framed on three research strands: <strong>Sport as Therapy</strong>; <strong>Narratives of Sport and Mental Health</strong>; and<strong> Sport as a Challenge to Mental Health</strong>. &nbsp;As our plans for the Collaborative Award progressed, sexuality became an increasingly important theme - spanning all three of our research strands - but was also the one we felt we needed the most development, planning and support to research.&nbsp;</p> <p>Objectives:</p> <ol> <li>Test methods for recruiting and interviewing athletes about this emotive and, sadly, still controversial topic</li> <li>Bring together academics,&nbsp;athletes and activists to inform our approach to research and knowledge exchange</li> <li>Consult archives to assess their importance to the future project</li> <li>Construct a database of sport autobiographies that deal with sexuality</li> <li>Explore publish engagement possibilities, including filming a documentary</li> </ol>

Amount: £75,271
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Strathclyde

Phenotyping regulatory B cells in the microenvironment of Hodgkin lymphoma 27 Apr 2017

<p>The role of malignant B cells in Hodgkin lymphoma is unknow. Recent studies in Birmingham have provided preliminary evidence that non-malignant B cells frequently infiltrate the tissue of Hodgkin&rsquo;s lymphoma. Furthermore, previous studies reported the clinical benefit of Rituximab, with CD20 negative tumour cells, which was unanticipated as it is a therapy targeted to CD20 positive cells. This suggested that non-tumour B cells promote tumour cell survival. Moreover, my supervisor's lab has recently optimised highly sensitive in situ hybridisation to detect in tissue sections the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10, widely established as a marker of a subset of regulatory B cells. Taking these findings into consideration I am to:</p> <ol> <li>Characterise the non-tumour B cell population of Hodgkin&rsquo;s lymphoma</li> <li>Determine the extent to which the phenotype of non-malignant B cells in Hodgkin&rsquo;s lymphoma varies with tumour subtype and EBV status</li> <li>To determine the extent at which Hodgkin&rsquo;s lymphoma xenografts recapitulate B cell infiltration in a humanised mouse model</li> </ol> <p>&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Birmingham

Mechanisms and Regulation of RNAP transcription 11 Jul 2017

<p>This grant focuses on four lines of scientific enquiry converging on RNAP function</p> <ol> <li>Characterisation of the molecular mechanisms underlying RNA polymerase and basal factors that facilitate transcription initiation, elongation and termination by using multidisciplinary approaches in vivo and in vitro. This includes using bespoke transcription assays, structure elucidation and a global characterization of the occupancy and transcriptomes.</li> <li>Identification of novel gene-specific factors and characterization of the proteomes of transcription preinitiation- and elongation complexes in vivo. Identification and characterization of RNAP-associated proteinaceous- and RNA regulators.</li> <li>Characterisation of the structure and function of archaeal chromatin formed by A3 and 1647 histone variants. A biophysical characterization of protein-DNA interactions and a whole-genome view of histone occupancy. Focus on the impact of chromatin on RNAP as it progresses through the transcription cycle, and the role of elongation factors to overcome the inhibitory effect of chromatin.</li> <li>Characterisation of factors that modulate RNAP during virus-host interactions. Virus (RIP)- and host (TFS4)-encoded RNAP-binding factors function as global inhibitors of transcription and their mechanism is reminiscent of antibiotics. Using two virus libraries of we want to screen for novel RNAP-binding regulators and use them as molecular probes to dissect RNAP function.</li> </ol>

Amount: £2,029,869
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Evasion of innate immunity by HIV-1 during the early stages of viral replication 11 Jul 2017

<p>The entry process of HIV-1 and the early events of its replication cycle are vulnerable to interferon-induced restriction and pattern recognition. We have shown that a family of interferon-induced membrane proteins (IFITMs) restrict the entry of HIV-1 dependent on their CD4 and coreceptor usages. Importantly, viruses that are transmitted between individuals are able to avoid IFITM-mediated restriction, correlating with their inherent resistance to type-1 interferons. Therefore, IFITMs are an important barrier for person-to-person spread. In this proposal, we will identify the determinants of IFITM resistance/sensitivity in the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (env) and use this knowledge to answer outstanding questions about the cell biology of HIV-1 entry and tropism. We will characterize how escape from early antibody responses in patients leads to the emergence of interferon-sensitivity in env, and how a polymorphism in <em>ifitm3</em> limits host control of HIV-1 replication in acute infection. Lastly, we will build on preliminary data to understand how the virion-associated accessory protein, Vpr, shuts-down pattern recognition receptor signalling immediately after cellular entry, and identify the host protein(s) it targets to achieve this. These studies will yield important insights into the avoidance of innate immunity by HIV-1 of relevance for therapeutic intervention and immunogen design.</p>

Amount: £1,881,715
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London

Molecular basis for motor-cargo cooperation in mitosis 11 Jul 2017

<p>Defects in chromosome segregation give rise to aneuploidy and chromosome instability, important hallmarks of cancer. Equal partitioning of sister chromatids to daughter cells requires microtubules to assemble into a mitotic spindle and to power chromosome segregation. Microtubules depend on multiple microtubule motor proteins to assemble into a spindle and segregate chromosomes. <strong>However, how motors cooperate with each other and with their cargos to drive mitosis is still virtually unknown. </strong>I will use a holistic mechanistic approach to understand how motor cooperation ensures faithful mitosis. We will focus on two key mitotic motor families, the non-motile Kinesin-13 microtubule depolymerases and CENP-E, critical for chromosome alignment, as paradigms for understanding motor cooperation during cell division. &nbsp;</p> <p>Combining structural and cell biology with single molecule reconstitution, we will define how<strong> Kinesin-13</strong> motors cooperate with Kinesin-8 translocating motors for microtubule end targeting and depolymerization, and how <strong>CENP-E</strong> cooperates with the outer kinetochore of unaligned chromosomes, to achieve chromosome biorientation and segregation. These studies will provide a mechanistic understanding of the emerging role of kinesin-cargo cooperation in ensuring faithful cell division. Understanding these interactions will create new opportunities for the rational design of kinesin inhibitors in the treatment of cancer.</p>

Amount: £1,597,543
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Edinburgh

OLIVER SACKS (WT) 30 Apr 2017

This ambitious and innovative feature documentary film is the definitive biography of renowned neurologist Oliver Sacks. With exclusive access to Sacks’ riveting and profoundly moving twilight reflections after receiving his terminal diagnosis, and crafted with a unique range of archive, this is a deeply illuminating exploration of the science of human consciousness and the nature of subjectivity. A meditation on the deep and intimate relation between art, science and storytelling, the scope of the project is vast. Our Emmy, BAFTA and Academy Award winning team are aiming to produce a creatively bold piece of cinema that pushes the documentary form, telling Sacks’ extraordinary life in the spirit of the man himself. With a non-linear structure and crafted with a myriad of material, the visual language of the film is central to conveying his work; altered states of consciousness and different neural rhythms - placing the experience of viewing the film on the threshold between the inner and outer world. Also true to the Sacks’ demystification of science, we aim to build a tailored outreach campaign focussed on accessibility; engaging an audience across the big universal questions; the vital scientific, neurological and philosophical themes that Sack’s career explored.

Amount: £85,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: City Lore

Chloroquine/Hydroxychloroquine prevention of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in the healthcare setting; a randomised, placebo-controlled prophylaxis study (COPCOV) 30 Sep 2020

There is no proven treatment, chemoprophylaxis or vaccine for COVID-19. This is the most serious pandemic emergency for 100 years. Healthcare workers are being affected disproportionately in the continuing epidemic threatening an imminent breakdown of health services. Chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine are safe and well-tolerated medications which can be taken for years without adverse effects.Both have significant antiviral activity against SARS-CoV-2 and there is emerging evidence from China and Europe of efficacy in treatment. Unfortunately there is also premature recommendation from countries such as India which now recommends low dose hydroxychloroquine for prophylaxis in health care workers. We propose conducting a multi-centre, multi-country randomised, double blind, placebo controlled assessment of the prophylactic efficacy of chloroquine (Asia) or hydroxychloroquine (Europe) in preventing COVID-19 illness in at-risk healthcare workers and other frontline staff. At least 40,000 participants in Asia and Europe will be randomised 1:1 to receive chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine or a matched film coated placebo as daily prophylaxis for three months. The study’s objectives are the prevention of symptomatic coronavirus disease (COVID-19) and the attenuation of the clinical severity.

Amount: £6,920,135
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford
Amount: £224,392
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Sheffield

Serological studies to quantify SARS-CoV-2 population infection risk in Singapore, Hong Kong and Thailand 30 Sep 2020

We propose a prospective serological study to investigate the incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection in the general population in three Asian settings: Singapore, Hong Kong and Thailand. The study will aim to measure the age-specific seroprevalence and incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection at 3 time points, each 6 months apart. Age-specific incidence estimates will be applied to the census population to obtain numbers of infections in the population at each time point. These estimates will be compared with external data on COVID-19 hospitalisations and deaths in each setting, to calculate age-specific infection-hospitalisation and infection-fatality ratios. SARS-CoV-2 antibody kinetics will be defined by studying changes in antibody titres over time. Risk factors for infection will be studied by comparing SARS-CoV-2 seroconverters and non-seroconverters with respect to epidemiological exposures. This study will provide crucial information regarding population exposure and SARS-CoV-2 transmission dynamics, and will provide a complete picture of the relationship between clinically apparent and asymptomatic infections.

Amount: £823,390
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: National University of Singapore

The African coaLition for Epidemic Research, Response and Training, Clinical Characterization Protocol (ALERRT CCP) 30 Sep 2020

As part of the response to the emergence of COVID-19, the World Health Organization Africa Regional Office is organizing various Infection Prevention and Control (IPC) and critical care training activities targeted at Low and Middle-Income countries (LMICs) in Africa. While the initiatives taken by WHO/AFRO are critical, training for research into the disease also needs to be targeted at the same LMICs, because being an Emerging Infectious Disease, we need to "learn-as-we-go". Clinical research on COVID-19 will have to be closely integrated with the IPC, clinical care, and epidemiological training activities, including use of the WHO First Few X (FFX) Cases and contact investigation protocol for COVID-19. ALERRT proposes to work closely with the WHO/AFRO and Africa CDC and existing networks and structures across Africa and globally to provide the fore-mentioned clinical research training and support. ALERRT is a member of the Global Federation - ISARIC, which has developed a Clinical Characterization protocol for COVID-19. This protocol been endorsed by the WHO and is currently being used in China and across the UK and Europe.Being already established and conducting activities in sub-Sahara Africa, the ALERRT network has the capacity to effectively implement the proposed project.

Amount: £1,416,424
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Kwame Nkrumah University of Science a...