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Funders:
Paul Hamlyn Foundation
The Wellcome Trust
Recipients:
Florida State University
Amounts:
£500 - £1,000

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Results

Beautiful mechanism: The eye, the microscope and the language of wonder in Victorian science 29 May 2009

This project examines Victorian texts on the microscope, both popular and scientific. I argue British science writing of the nineteenth century adapted a romantic rhetoric of wonder are sublime. This visionary discourse frequently appeared in popular science texts written by any women and children. Surprisingly, it also marks professional medical treatises on the eye and analogue, the microscope, even as many Victorian researchers distance themselves from real theology and warn that human and microscopic vision are inherently flawed. This ambivalent characterizes authors as distinct as Darwin and Gosse. Microscopy texts put the language wonder to new, secular use when they discuss education, the adulteration of domestic space British empire, and microscope technology. Thus, even as the microscope prompts significant research in cell theory and bacteriology, its meaning remains unstable. I am requesting funding to allow me to complete researching and begin revising a chapter current book project. During the two-week visit, I plan to work with the Wellcome's collection of microscopy texts. Following the grant period, I will apply for NSF funding to complete the book and submit completed manuscript to a university press by December 2010.

Amount: £1,474
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Florida State University

Medicine, Astrology and Philosophy in the Pseudo-Galenic De Spermate 29 Aug 2008

The project is collaboration with Prof. Vivian Nutton to examine the philosophical and astrological background of the pseudo-Galenic De Spermate (existing in Latin translation, dated to the thirteen and fourteen centuries). Our specific goals are to evaluate the philosophical and astrological background of the treatise and in particular its Neoplatonic influence; to establish possible Neoplatonic sources; to examine the dialogue between medicine, philosophy, and astrology in the treatise; to assess the attitude toward astrology in the treatise in the context of the traditional antithetical relationship between medicine and astrology and philosophy in Late Antiquity.

Amount: £750
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Florida State University