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Funders:
Paul Hamlyn Foundation
The Wellcome Trust
Recipients:
Glasgow Caledonian University
Amounts:
£500 - £1,000

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Results

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship. 25 Jun 2012

Not available

Amount: £1,440
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Glasgow Caledonian University

Master's Studentship 12 Jul 2011

Not available

Amount: £18,005
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Glasgow Caledonian University

"Gender and the history of nursing" to be held at Glasgow Caledonian University on 1 April 2011 21 Feb 2011

This colloquium brings together scholars working in the history of nursing, and as such is a successor to the symposia in the history of nursing previously sponsored solely by the UK Centre for the History of Nursing and Midwifery. The particular theme of this year's event is gender in nursing history, an area which has received surprisingly little systematic attention. As such, the intention is to open up the history of nursing to the sort of investigation and analysis commonly employed in other branches of historical study. In this respect it is also worth stressing the collaborative nature of this project which will, hopefully, provide a platform for future cross-institutional/centre events of this kind. The organisers are especially keen to encourage graduate students working in the field and part of the present bid is for small bursaries to cover travel and/or accommodation.

Amount: £900
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Glasgow Caledonian University

Marginal maternity: The Church of Scotland and unmarried mothers 1900-48 14 Dec 2010

This project aims to highlight the importance of the Church of Scotland as a provider of maternal healthcare for unwed mothers during the first half of the twentieth century, a period when Scotland had the highest infant and maternal mortality rates in the United Kingdom. Maternal health was a particular concern in Glasgow due to the large numbers of women living in both poverty and poor housing. A core part of the Kirk's new social mission was 'rescue and preventive work' for young women in urban areas, including hostels and rescue homes. And, in 1915, they opened a maternity home for unwed mothers in Glasgow. While historians have considered the broader importance of maternal healthcare to early twentieth century social reform efforts and highlighted the importance of unwed mothers within this mission, as well as efforts of the Catholic Church and the Salvation Army in this area, the Church of ' Scotland has been neglected. Yet the Kirk was the established national church, the leading denomination in terms of membership share, a leading contributor to Scottish health debates and the first Protestant denomination to build a hospital in Britain- the Deaconess Hospital in Edinburgh. This project will highlight the extent and nature of this healthcare provision and where it fit within Scotland's mixed economy of healthcare between 1900 and the onset of the NHS in 1948. It will also highlight how the Kirk entwined maternal healthcare and social welfare with its definition of citizenship in relation to broader Scottish perceptions of maternal citizenship. The project will result in scholarly articles, conference papers and articles in popular magazines, including the Church of Scotland's own Life and Work, a workshop on the voluntary provision of healthcare since 1850, and public engagement activities. Lastly, this small project will provide the foundation and first stage of a larger project examining the health and welfare provision, as well as the knowledge exchange, between voluntary providers in industrial communities- particularly religious groups and employers, who were two of the largest providers at the end of the nineteenth century. Archival location and a scoping exercise is on-going to define the final parameters of the project.

Amount: £3,081
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Glasgow Caledonian University

Dr Lachan Grant of Ballachulish: the unintended roles of the medical practitioner in the Scottish Highlands, 1871-1945 30 Nov 2010

This project, a collaboration between academic historians and people in the community, is intended to explore and make better known the life and significance of Dr Lachlan Grant, GP at Ballachulish for much of the first half of the twentieth century. Trained in Edinburgh, and capable (as shown by his research interests) of having had a high-level career, Grant chose to become a rural GP. At Ballachulish, as medical officer in the local slate quarries, he was a key figure in labour disputes of national significance. Later Grant, whose political contacts were extensive, campaigned for (a) healthcare improvement of the sort eventually made possible by the Highlands and Islands Medical Service and (b) the creation of a Highland development agency modelled on Roosevelt's Tennessee Valley Authority. The project will involve academics from the UHI Millennium Institute (soon to be the University of the Highlands and Islands), Glasgow Caledonian University, Manchester Metropolitan University, the University of Aberdeen and the University of Edinburgh -as well as locally active individuals drawn from Ballachulish Community Council, Lochaber Historical Society and the wider community. The project will result in a conference in Ballachulish, an exhibition, material on various websites and the publication of scholarly journal articles.

Amount: £3,621
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Glasgow Caledonian University

Support for HoM Masters 21 Sep 2010

Not available

Amount: £23,785
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Glasgow Caledonian University

MA in History of Medicine 30 Nov 2009

This project takes a primarily social/economic approach to a series of inter-related questions in the history of medicine/health and healthcare. It allows for scholarly engagement across a series of sub-themes. The principal goal is the expansion of the social/economic history of medicine/health and healthcare as a field; and the development of scholars, both new and established, within it into a coherent and dynamic group. This will be achieved through: a planned series of academic meetin gs which directly engage with project themes and which allow scholarly collaboration among Centre members; and with historians of medicine/health and healthcare nationally and internationally. the consequent enabling of scholarly publications in the form of monographs; edited volumes; and articles targeted at a wide range of both specialist and generalist journals. The aim here, as previously, is to bring the work of the Centre and its members to a wide academic audience. the further wi dening of the Centre s audience through public engagement activities directed at a) lay groups such as local schoolchildren b) health professionals. the establishment of the Centre as the primary Scottish locus for the socio-economic history of medicine/health and healthcare, but a locus with a national and international profile.

Amount: £21,653
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Glasgow Caledonian University

Biomedical vacation scholarship. 29 May 2009

Not available

Amount: £2,700
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Glasgow Caledonian University

Health, Healthcare and Society: Environment, Markets, Life-Cycle and Location. 08 May 2008

This project takes a primarily social/economic approach to a series of inter-related questions in the history of medicine/health and healthcare. It allows for scholarly engagement across a series of sub-themes. The principal goal is the expansion of the social/economic history of medicine/health and healthcare as a field; and the development of scholars, both new and established, within it into a coherent and dynamic group. This will be achieved through: a planned series of academic meetin gs which directly engage with project themes and which allow scholarly collaboration among Centre members; and with historians of medicine/health and healthcare nationally and internationally. the consequent enabling of scholarly publications in the form of monographs; edited volumes; and articles targeted at a wide range of both specialist and generalist journals. The aim here, as previously, is to bring the work of the Centre and its members to a wide academic audience. the further wi dening of the Centre s audience through public engagement activities directed at a) lay groups such as local schoolchildren b) health professionals. the establishment of the Centre as the primary Scottish locus for the socio-economic history of medicine/health and healthcare, but a locus with a national and international profile.

Amount: £369,610
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Glasgow Caledonian University

MA in History of Medicine 16 Sep 2008

Not available

Amount: £20,942
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Glasgow Caledonian University

Conference of the Society for the Social History of Medicine 2008 to be held in Glasgow 3-5th September 2008 16 Jun 2008

Conference of the Society for the Social History of Medicine, 2008

Amount: £11,420
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Glasgow Caledonian University

Health and Health Care in the Scottish Highlands, 1845-1950. 19 Feb 2008

While we now know a reasonable amount about the history of the Scottish Highlands in the modern era, health, healthcare and welfare issues remain seriously neglected. This project is the second phase of an archival scoping investigation, aimed a identifying and assessing key primary source for a long term project on health provision in the Scottish Highlands. Vital but underused archival sources have already been identified; this project would result in a detailed analysis of these records. The ultimate aims of this project are to address the following key areas: (1) How did the image of the Highlands of Scotland as a 'peripheral' region affect health and social welfare provision in the period 1845 to 1950? (2) What, during this period, was the relationship between statutory provision of health welfare and that of private enterprise and initiative, and how did this differ from elsewhere in Scotland/Britain? (3) In what specific ways have the particular historical circumstances of Highland Scotland contributed to contemporary health issues?

Amount: £1,515
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Glasgow Caledonian University

'Urban Health in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries' seminar series to be held in 2008 at Glasgow Caledonian University. 19 Dec 2007

This is the second 'themed' seminar series to be organized by the CSHHH; and the success of that held in autumn 2007 attests to the validity of this approach. For spring 2008 the broad theme is 'urban health in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries', an important issue which nonetheless has not been dealt with in any systematic way in recent Scottish conferences/seminar series. The notion of 'urban health' has been broadly construed and this has enabled us to bring to the series a group of historians with differing research and publication interests, but whose work nonetheless has much to tell us about health and social conditions, and the treatment of 'problems' in these areas, in the towns and cities of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Amount: £698
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Glasgow Caledonian University

On the periphery? Occupational health and industrial medicine in the West of Scotland 1945-1980s. 14 Nov 2006

On the periphery? Occupational health and industrial medicine in the West of Scotland 1945-1980s Resonant with the Wellcome Trust's funding priority of Health, Medicine and the Environment, this pilot project will examine occupational health provision in the West of Scotland c.1945-1980s, focusing on the shipbuilding industry, forming the basis of a future more comprehensive research programme on occupational health in a range of Scottish industries. In conceptual terms, the study will examine the dynamics of regional distinctiveness, testing the relevance of a core/periphery model in relation to occupational health policy and provision in late twentieth century Scotland. The project will involve a combination of archival research and oral history methodology - previously deployed by the applicants in their research on asbestos disease and coal dust disease - with the Research Assistant conducting a reconnaissance of relevant primary sources as well as assisting in the selection and interviewing of oral history respondents. The oral history element of the project will culminate in a witness seminar comprising occupational health professionals involved with workplace health in Scotland during this period.

Amount: £10,648
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Glasgow Caledonian University

Seminar Series:'Religion, Health and Welfare in Europe from the Eighteenth to the Twentieth Centuries' to be held at Glasgow Caldeonian University 2007-08. 18 Jul 2007

Seminar Series: 'Religion, Health and Welfare in Europe from the Eighteenth to the Twentieth Centuries', Glasgow Caledonian University, 4 meetings, Semester A, 2007-08 This is an application under the Symposia scheme from Professor John Stewart, CSHHH, School of Law and Social Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, for £857 towards a seminar series to be held at Glasgow Caledonian University (Semester A, 2007-2008). The seminar series is entitled 'Religion, Health and Welfare in Europe from the Eighteenth to the Twentieth Centuries' and it will consist of four meetings. The general aim of the series is to have scholarly discussions - open to members of academic staff, postgraduate and postdoctoral students, and undergraduate students from the host universities (Glasgow Caledonian University and the University of Strathclyde) and throughout Central Scotland - led by invited speakers. The invited speakers are at different career stages which is a strength. It is also a strength that the seminar series will result in a publication. Finally, the series will help the CSHHH establish itself as a centre for the history of medicine (it will help 'capacity building'). An award of £857 is recommended.

Amount: £857
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Glasgow Caledonian University

Death, mourning commemoration in late twentieth-century Scotland: the impact of medicalisation and rationalisation on everyday death practices. 30 Aug 2006

Passing Time - Death in Late Twentieth Century Scotland The focus of this research project will be on changing practices surrounding death, the 'ultimate' rite of passage. In particular, it will consider the impact of the medicalisation and rationalisation of death and dying on social attitudes in a period when healthcare practice was improving and life expectancies increased. These broad themes are investigated within a tightly focussed geographical area and time frame - namely late twentieth century Scotland. The study will address 3 sets of key research questions: What has been the impact of rapid and fundamental change in terms of demography, medicalisation and secularisation on Scottish death practices? How far has the handling of death been a metaphor of attitudes towards wider social arrangements concerning the community, gender relations and the family? How far do the essential themes identified by the sociologists like Schilling have a resonance in Scottish experience? These include: privatisation and rationalisation in the organisation of death; shrinkage in scope of sacred in terms of experience of death; fundamental shift in corporeal boundaries, symbolic and actual which separate dead from living. What patterns have evolved in terms of gendered death? How far, for example, has the process of 'defeminising' the management of death been challenged by the hospice movement?

Amount: £1,546
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Glasgow Caledonian University

Delineating pathways downstream of Keap1-Nrf2 as targets for neuronal protection in AD. 31 May 2018

Nrf2 activators show promise in preventing memory-loss in animal models of AD, but have side-effects in humans. A new class of drugs which activate Nrf2 by blocking its interaction with Keap1, reduce brain damage in Drosophila and mouse neuron AD models. Nrf2 leads to the transcription of hundreds of cytoprotective genes, and we need to understand which of these mediate neuronal protection by Keap1-Nrf2 disruptors and the effectiveness of these compounds in human cells. Using a hiPSC model of AD-associated amyloid toxicity, this project aims to study the effects of a Keap1-Nrf2 disruptor, 18e, on Nrf2 target gene expression in human AD.Changes in Nrf2-pathway gene expression levels following Abeta treatment will be assessed using PCR array profiling. qPCR will then be used to validate these changes and measure the effects of 18e on their expression. A disease-altering treatment for dementia is necessary to improve the lives of the escalating numbers of patients and carers worldwide. This research will provide a first step in identifying the Nrf2-target genes most closely associated with prevention of amyloid damage to human neurons. Targeting Nrf2 genes more selectively may prove useful in the development of safer treatments to protect neurons in AD and other dementias.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Glasgow Caledonian University