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Funders:
Paul Hamlyn Foundation
The Wellcome Trust
Recipients:
Northumbria University
Amounts:
£500 - £1,000

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Results

Sub-Saharan Africa Advanced Training Programme for Leadership and Excellence in Biostatistics 05 May 2015

Sub-Saharan African (SSA) bears the highest burden of communicable and non-communicable diseases. Funding initiatives for health-sciences research in the region have generated high quality data from demographic and health surveillance sites (DHSS) and nationally representative demographic and healthsurveys. Other funding tools help the region to collect routine health data using the district health information systems. However, the capacity to analyse and formulate locally relevant scientific questions is limited. Individuals capable of robust, innovative and elaborate analyses are often overwhelmed and there is limited capacity to manage and use existing data to inform policy makers and local health service implementers. Ground breaking research in HIV and AIDS, TB, malaria, other infectious diseases and research on health systems has largely relied on statistical and data expertise from developed countries. With emerging non-communicable diseases, there will be a need for even more biostatistical expertise. To facilitate high quality research, a training programme is needed to increase the number of both methodological and applied biostatisticians. This will build the capacity to handle advanced statistical analysis, enhance grantsmanship, and reduce dependence on external experts. The Wellcome Trust African Institutions Initiative (AII) through several consortia (CARTA, THRiVE, SACORE, etc) has made significant progress to build research capacity.However, enhancement by the creation of a clear research capacity in biostatistics that fully complements such initiatives is needed. Previous efforts to develop statistics have been disjointed, with statisticians leavingto private industry, as there are few academic centres for biostatistics that are tightly linked to local biomedical research. Previous regional meetings recognised the need to pull resources to build biostatistics capacity, which resulted in the formation of the Sub-Saharan African Consortium for Advanced Biostatistical Training (S2ACABT), which forms the basis of this proposed programme to Wellcome Trust. S2ACABT brings together African and Northern academic/research institutions todevelop and improve biostatistical skills among researchers. The ultimate goalis to create research nodes of excellence to grow the discipline and a biostatistical network to nurture researchers with advanced skills and expertise. S2ACABT will support the development of a network of statisticians to deliver statistical courses for biomedical researchers, develop and implement statistical theory to analyse health data, and create the framework for improved biostatistical skills among health researchers and academics in nine African countries. This network will be integrated within the existing Sub-Saharan Africa Network (SUSAN) under the International Biometrics Society (IBS). Strengthening the existing research infrastructure and imbedding biostatisticstraining within these structures will improve local statistical expertise and enable high-level data analysis capacity. This will generate a pool of Africanbiostatisticians who can lead future analyses. The consortium will: 1. Develop, strengthen and implement high quality biostatistics masters' leveltraining at the lead and partner institutions. 2. Provide PhD level training to develop expertise, skills, and become research leaders in biostatistics in Africa. 3. Build a sustainable network of biostatisticians and statistically informed researchers within each country through outreach, mentoring and transferring skills, workshops and conferences. 4. Integrate meetings with IBS through SUSAN and National Statistical Societies

Amount: £57,201
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Northumbria University

Disorganised Attachment in Contemporary Attachment Theory: a critical analysis of paradigms, debates and applications. 22 Jun 2015

Contemporary Attachment Theory will be a four-year project involving archive research and interviews with 25 leading attachment researchers in the US and UK. It builds on my prior archive research in this area, conducted in the Wellcome Trust Library archives in 2012, and now accepted as peer-reviewed articles. A first goal is to use a sociological perspective to trace developments in the study and conceptualisation of attachment since 1990. I have been offered unprecedented access to all unpubl ished data, manuscripts and notes, and relevant correspondence, from leading attachment researchers with differing perspectives, such as Mary Main and Patricia Crittenden. The research will critically examine contemporary controversies in the field, exploring the conceptualisations of child mental health at stake. It will also assess the implications of different attachment theories for health and welfare interventions with children in the US and UK (e.g. the Circle of Security). A Wellcome PhD student will be requested. Outputs will contribute directly to theory in developmental psychopathology, to the history of discovery in psychological medicine, and to debates regarding interventions using attachment. For the duration of research I have been offered a Visiting position at UC Berkeley, the site of a key archive. In year three, a symposium will bring together researchers from divergent attachment paradigms to integrate knowledge in the discipline. The fourth year will be spent writi ng a textbook on contemporary attachment theory, drawing on the interviews and unpublished material, and with chapters revised and approved by each relevant scholar.

Amount: £16,185
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Northumbria University

Disorganised Attachment in Contemporary Attachment Theory: a critical analysis of paradigms, debates and applications. 27 Jan 2014

Contemporary Attachment Theory will be a four-year project involving archive research and interviews with 25 leading attachment researchers in the US and UK. It builds on my prior archive research in this area, conducted in the Wellcome Trust Library archives in 2012, and now accepted as peer-reviewed articles. A first goal is to use a sociological perspective to trace developments in the study and conceptualisation of attachment since 1990. I have been offered unprecedented access to all unpubl ished data, manuscripts and notes, and relevant correspondence, from leading attachment researchers with differing perspectives, such as Mary Main and Patricia Crittenden. The research will critically examine contemporary controversies in the field, exploring the conceptualisations of child mental health at stake. It will also assess the implications of different attachment theories for health and welfare interventions with children in the US and UK (e.g. the Circle of Security). A Wellcome PhD student will be requested. Outputs will contribute directly to theory in developmental psychopathology, to the history of discovery in psychological medicine, and to debates regarding interventions using attachment. For the duration of research I have been offered a Visiting position at UC Berkeley, the site of a key archive. In year three, a symposium will bring together researchers from divergent attachment paradigms to integrate knowledge in the discipline. The fourth year will be spent writi ng a textbook on contemporary attachment theory, drawing on the interviews and unpublished material, and with chapters revised and approved by each relevant scholar.

Amount: £389,816
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Northumbria University

Forensic Genetics and Family Relationships. 15 Jul 2013

Research on the role of Familial Searching in support of criminal investigations in order to: describe and evaluate current UK and US deliberations on legal, social and ethical benefits and risks associated with this form of forensic genetic practice; marshall existing data on the uses of familial searching in particular criminal investigations; produce a background paper on these deliberations; and develop a funding bid to undertake further comparative research to map changes in the legislative and regulatory frameworks that govern this emerging practice in different jurisdictions.

Amount: £4,910
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Northumbria University

Biomedical Vactaion Scholarship. 25 Jun 2012

Not available

Amount: £900
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Northumbria University

More Humanity: Christine Borland's translation of empathy in medical anatomy and clinical practice and its incorporation in visual art. 14 Jun 2010

First, the proposed research will examine artist Christine Borland's methodology, focusing on notable artworks made during the last fifteen years. Second, it will analyse how contemporary artworks reference medical history and clinical practices towards providing a renewed direction to advanced artistic practice. The key goals are to record an in-depth interview with Christine Borland, with the production of an interview transcript, and to publish the research findings of the project in a peer review journal.

Amount: £887
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Northumbria University