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Paul Hamlyn Foundation
The Wellcome Trust
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University College London
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Results

Global Health 50/50: Towards accountability for gender equality in global health 04 Dec 2017

We propose to establish Global Health 50/50, a new initiative seeking to advance action and accountability for gender-equality in global health. Gender is a key driver of power to exercise the right to health, including exposure to risks of poor health, health seeking behaviours, and access to quality health care. Gender inequalities continue to define and drive career pathways and opportunities for people working in global health organizations. While some progress has been made, major gaps and challenges remain. We seek to raise awareness of persistent inequality and identify pathways to change. We will establish a network of experts in gender and global health, working with an advisory body drawn from the realms of politics, development, management, advocacy, human rights, social justice. Global Health 50/50 will publish an annual report on the state of gender-related policies and practices of 150 major organizations working in the field of global health.

Amount: £29,764
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Neuronal encoding of complex three-dimensional environments 31 May 2018

This proposed research intends to investigate the brain representation of complex, multilayered three-dimensional environments in free-roaming rodents by detecting electrical neuronal activities. With the assumption that the grid cell can form a lattice representation in a volumetric space, the main goal of this project is to test this hypothesis and construct more detailed mosaic neuronal models. From the previous experimental evidence, the grid cell plays a pivotal role in distance-measuring by forming a grid-like array on a flat surface, however, how this array is remodelled in vertical or tilled surface remains debatable. In this project, rats will be allowed to explore in a giant lattice model with options of climbing up or down, dwelling forwards or backwards while looking for rewards. The neuronal activities in rat's hippocampus will be collected, reconstructed into a 3D model. If the hypothesis is to be correct, the 3D cognition map is suggested to be a multiple evenly-spaced neuron filed distributed volumetrically (figure1, D and E). Otherwise, the field might be distributed in parallel columns vertical to the ground, as the extension of the 2D hexagonal array (figure 1, C).

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

4 year PhD in Neuroscience 30 Sep 2017

Not available

Amount: £2,850,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Vacation Scholarships 2017 - University College London 16 Jun 2017

Vacation Scholarships 2017 - University College London

Amount: £25,500
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Studying murine behaviour and extending the hippocampal place cell model to 3 dimensions 27 Apr 2017

In previous decades, studies focussing on hippocampal place cell activity have resorted to using 2-dimensional simulation models. I argue that such a paradigm proves to be insufficient when extending it to real-world, heavily 3D-biased, applications. As such, in this project, I propose an alternative approach to the study of place cells in which a rat’s neuronal activity is wirelessly monitored while it is allowed to freely explore a lattice maze in all directions of Cartesian space. Most importantly, I aim to show that receptive fields are of similar sizes in the horizontal and vertical directions; I also hypothesise that concatenating receptive fields (RFs) from several place cells will yield a layered organisation with inter-RF distances being larger in the x-z/y-z planes than the x-y plane. Incidentally, this study will also provide data which I hypothesise will confirm the horizontal bias model in murine behaviour proposed by Jovalekic et al. (2011).

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Investigating the sleep modulating effect of oxytocin in zebrafish models of autism. 27 Apr 2017

In this project I will test the hypothesis that oxytocin expression and development of oxytocin-expressing neurons are altered in zebrafish with mutations in the ASD risk genes cntnap2 and chd8. I hope to find evidence for the sleep modulating effects of oxytocin, and posit whether deficiencies in oxytocin signalling pathways may contribute to sleep disorders in autism mutants. I will examine oxytocin mRNA levels across the day/night cycle for both wild-type and mutant fish established in the Rihel lab. I will then analyse the pattern of oxytocin expression in the brains of mutant embryos and their wild-type siblings. From the findings in related studies with cntnap2 mutant mice and the Rihel lab zebrafish models of autism (see references [3] and [6]), I expect to see an alteration in the amount of oxytocin mRNA for day/night between the wild-type and mutant embryos, and a change in the number of neurons expressing oxytocin. If such changes are found, they could explain the sleep phenotype observed in cntnap2 autism mutants, and elucidate a link between neuronal circuit dysfunction and behavioural perturbation in this animal model.

Amount: £0
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Overcoming constraints on T cells in the HBV-infected liver 05 Dec 2016

My request for enhancement funding arises from the component of my existing award focused on developing T cell immunotherapy of hepatitis B and hepatocellular carcinoma using patient samples. We recently made important contributions to the testing of genetically redirected T cells for a first-in-man treatment of HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma1. We are also collaborating with academic and pharmaceutical partners to develop immunotherapeutic vaccines aiming to boost antiviral T cells for hepatitis B control. However, these approaches remain limited by the profound exhaustion and other immune constraints imposed on T cells by high-level antigenic stimulation in the tolerogenic liver. Front-line candidates to revive T cells are checkpoint inhibitors such as PD-1 blockade. However, we have found that genetic knockdown of PD-1 can initiate detrimental effects in virus-specific T cells (Fig.1). The emerging concept that PD- 1 may actually be required to support long-term maintenance of T cells in the setting of persistent antigenic stimulation is underscored by recent work in murine models2, 3 and by our finding that liver-resident PD-1+T cells can remain highly functional (Pallett, in preparation). These discoveries underscore the need to investigate more fundamental drivers and mediators of T cell failure as alternatives or additions to checkpoint inhibition.

Amount: £175,008
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Advancing Psychiatric Mapping Translated into Innovations for Care: PsyMaptic-A 05 Dec 2016

My current and previous Wellcome Trust Fellowships (Henry Wellcome, 2009-13; Henry Dale 2014- present) focus on important aetiological questions about psychotic disorders, using epidemiological data. Psychotic disorders are a debilitating set of mental health disorders, characterised by hallucinations, delusions and cognitive deficits. My research demonstrates that these disorders have a robust, replicable social aetiology, with higher incidence rates observed in young people,1–3 men,1–3 ethnic minorities2–7 and people exposed to greater social disadvantage.8–11 In my previous fellowship, I established the largest epidemiological study of first episode psychosis [FEP] in England since 1999, to demonstrate that these substantial mental health inequalities also exist in more rural populations (East Anglia)3,12; rates are over twice as high as expected,3,13 with deprived rural communities experiencing the highest psychosis incidence. This study has generated new Page 5 of 18 aetiological clues, for example by showing that people at "ultra-high risk" of psychosis are exposed to similar social and spatial markers of social disadvantage as FEP patients,14 implicating an aetiological role for social adversities prior to onset. I have also demonstrated that migrants face greatest FEP risk when immigrating in childhood,15 an important period of sociocognitive development. I am attempting to replicate this in my current Fellowship, in a larger longitudinal cohort using Swedish national register data. Using this data, I have already shown that refugees are at elevated psychosis risk compared with other migrants from the same region of origin,7 providing further insights into the possible social determinants of psychosis. Epidemiological data can also inform mental health service planning. In England, Early Intervention in Psychosis [EIP] services assess and treat people with suspected FEP, offering evidence-based multidisciplinary care to improve downstream clinical and social outcomes, shown to be highly costeffective.16 Unfortunately, original policy implementation guidance17 made no provision for the heterogeneity in incidence described above, with services commissioned on a uniform expectation of 15 new cases per 100,000 people-per-year. This was at least half the true incidence,1,3 and over three times lower than the overall referral rate for all suspected FEP, including "false positive" (nonFEP) referrals,3 who still require appropriate psychiatric triage and signposting, and consume additional EIP resources not factored into original guidance. In response, I demonstrated that epidemiological estimates of psychosis risk could be used to better predict the expected FEP incidence in the population at-risk in England,13 nationally and regionally. The tool, known as PsyMaptic, has had substantial impact on policy and commissioning since it was freely-released in 2012 (www.psymaptic.org).16,18–22 Most recently, it has been used to inform national EIP workforce calculations23 following the introduction of Access and Waiting time standards,19 as part of the Department of Health’s commitment to achieving parity of esteem between mental and physical health by 2020.24 Whilst I have demonstrated, via PsyMaptic, that it is possible to translate epidemiological data into effective public mental health,25 some vital methodological limitations require empirical attention. I therefore seek Wellcome Trust enhancement funding to answer four empirical questions to develop and apply novel statistical prediction methodologies to generate sustainable, dynamic populationbased models of future mental health need.

Amount: £204,479
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

UCL - Neuroscience 30 Sep 2016

Not available

Amount: £133,252
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

University College London/Birkbeck Interdisciplinary Programme in Structural, Computational and Chemical Biology 30 Sep 2016

University College London/Birkbeck Interdisciplinary Programme in Structural, Computational and Chemical Biology

Amount: £133,252
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

University College London/Birkbeck Interdisciplinary Programme in Structural, Computational and Chemical Biology 30 Sep 2016

University College London/Birkbeck Interdisciplinary Programme in Structural, Computational and Chemical Biology

Amount: £133,252
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

University College London/Birkbeck Interdisciplinary Programme in Structural, Computational and Chemical Biology 30 Sep 2016

University College London/Birkbeck Interdisciplinary Programme in Structural, Computational and Chemical Biology

Amount: £133,252
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Neuroscience 30 Sep 2016

Not available

Amount: £133,252
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

UCL - Neuroscience 30 Sep 2016

Not available

Amount: £133,252
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

UCL - Neuroscience 30 Sep 2016

Not available

Amount: £133,252
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Institutional Strategic Support Fund 07 Sep 2016

Not available

Amount: £3,000,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Created Out of Mind: Shaping perceptions of dementia through art and science 07 Mar 2016

Created Out of Mind will shape public and professional perceptions of dementia through a dynamic fusion of scientific and creative experimentation. Our Hub residency will support the active connection and collaboration of previously disparate cultures (scientists, artists, commissioners/policymakers) and infuse the insights and skills of people living with dementia, communications professionals and collaboration experts. Common (mis-)conceptions of dementia will be challenged through integrated artistic and scientific investigation of less recognised symptoms associated with typical and rare dementias. The project will investigate the neuroscientific, artistic and social bases of artistic engagement, enjoyment and change across multiple art forms. Interdisciplinary discussion, disagreement and creativity will also challenge and develop thinking regarding the principles, priorities, practice, health benefits and methodologically-robust evaluation of arts in dementia. Our inspiration comes directly from the intriguing experiences, heart-rending questions and puzzling uncertainties of people living with dementia. Team members will become creative collaborators whilst maintaining their professional ‘essence’, yielding a richly and meaningfully interconnected network of multi-skilled science/arts researchers, practitioners and communicators. We will also enrich understanding about dementia by raising provocative questions about the healthy brain, our emotional reactions to change in ourselves and others, and the attributes by which we value and define humanity.

Amount: £715,199
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London

Behavioural role and neural representation of temporal dynamics in sensory stimuli. 02 Dec 2015

The external world is not static but in a constant state of flux. To understand how the brain functions, we, therefore, must investigate how it extracts relevant information from dynamic, highly fluctuating sensory signals. Olfaction is an ideal modality with which to study this question. A key sense for nocturnal and crepuscular animals, such as laboratory rodents, the comparatively simple anatomy of the early olfactory system makes it highly accessible and tractable. Turbulent airflow creates a rich temporal structure in the intensity fluctuations of natural odour stimuli. Yet, how these dynamics are processed by the olfactory system and the extent to which it uses or ignores this information remains unknown. I have recently established quantitative behavioural tools, genetic and optogenetic manipulation of the early olfactory system, electrophysiological and imaging approaches in the awake behaving mouse, and the tools to measure and generate temporally fluctuating olfactory stimuli with high bandwidth. We will now combine these approaches to tackle key questions relating to the significance of natural dynamics for the coding of sensory stimuli. 1: What information is contained in the dynamics of natural olfactory stimuli?2: To what extent do neurons represent such dynamics? 3: How are stimulus dynamics used for behavioural tasks such as navigation? 4: What are the circuits and mechanisms that support, extract information from, or compensate for stimulus dynamics? My guiding hypothesis is that temporal dynamics and coherence of natural smells are decoded by the circuitry of the early olfactory system to extract information about distance, location and the nature of olfactory objects and scenes.

Amount: £1,627,188
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University College London